ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

WPost And NYTimes A1: Government Neglect Responsible For Flint’s Water Crisis.

A Washington Post  (1/24, A1, Bernstein, Dennis) analysis says, “The scale of government neglect in the water crisis in Flint, Mich., could place the city alongside some of the most infamous environmental disasters in US history.” According to the Post, none of the apologies and resignations “will quickly repair the deep, pervasive damage to the public’s trust in government, say experts and others involved in the crisis.”

In a 2,364-word front-page article, the New York Times  (1/23, A1, Goodnough, Davey, Smith, Subscription Publication) says “interviews, documents and emails show that as every major decision was made over more than a year, officials at all levels of government acted in ways that contributed to the public health emergency and allowed it to persist for months.” The Times adds, “through it all, officials persisted in playing down and dismissing the concerns of Flint residents – one referred to concerned residents groups as ‘anti-everything’ – and authoritatively vouching for the water’s purity, even as they themselves were debating whether it was pure.”

AP: Michigan “Cooperative And Confrontational” With EPA. The AP  (1/23, Schneider, Karoub) reports Keith Creagh, the interim director of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality, was on Friday both “cooperative and confrontational with the US Environmental Protection Agency in a letter pledging to work with the federal government to ensure the safety of Flint’s drinking water but challenging the legality and scope of some federal demands.” In his letter to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, Creagh said Michigan “‘is committed to working’ with her department and Flint to deal with the city’s lead-contamination problem,” but argues Thursday’s Federal order fails to “reference the tens of millions of dollars expended by … the state for water filters, drinking water, testing and medical services.”

Higher Education

Amenities, Flagging State Support Contribute To Rising College Costs.

The Washington Post  (1/22, Selingo) reports that while researchers say there are many contributing factors causing the cost of college attendance to greatly outpace inflation, a new report from the Delta Cost Project has released a study pointing the finger at “two key reasons.” The piece reports that students are demanding “more services outside the classroom and colleges are providing more amenities to attract applicants.” Meanwhile, states are reducing funding support for public colleges.

Rhode Island Governor Criticized For Use Of College Endowment Funds For Political Purposes.

The AP  (1/24, O’Brien) reports Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo is being criticized for her use of Rhode Island College Foundation funds to “advance her policy agenda.” The foundation hired a new chief innovation officer at the direction of Raimondo and was planning to pay for the Governor to visit the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, but criticism from donors stopped that plan from moving forward. Some state lawmakers have criticized Raimondo for using the foundation’s funds for political purposes. State Senator Paul Jabour says, “The one thing that doesn’t look good is that if you take money from the foundation it’s not subject to public record. There’s a transparency issue there.”

From ASEE
International Association of Continuing Engineering Education
Call for papers for May 17-20 conference in Porto, Portugal. January 31 deadline.

Surmounting the Barriers
The joint NAE-ASEE report makes recommendations for breaking down long-identified barriers to diversity in higher education.

Research and Development

Scientists Seek To Reduce Costs Of Smart Windows.

Engadget  (1/23, Moon) reported that researchers at MIT have devised “an equation that can predict how light goes through a rubber-like polymer structure” using a “rubbery material…called polydimethylsiloxane” that “has dark regions when at rest but gets more and more transparent” when stretched. Digital Trends  (1/22, McGrath) reported that scientists at the “University of Texas at Austin’s McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering are also working on making smart windows cheaper” using “an electrochromic material that blocks 90 percent of near-infrared rays and 80 percent of the sun’s visible light” controllable by the user. Press Trust of India  (1/22) also offered coverage.

Apple Hires Virtual Reality Prof. Doug Bowman.

The Wall Street Journal  (1/22, Nicas) reports Apple has hired Doug Bowman, a top virtual-reality research who is a computer-science professor at Virginia Tech, where he leads the Center for Human-Computer Interaction. Bowman has reportedly won awards for his research in virtual and augmented reality. The Journal adds that Apple’s hire of Bowman signals the company is studying advance technologies.

International Business Times  (1/22) reports the hire of Doug Bowman signals Apple’s attempt to “catch up with efforts from Facebook, Microsoft, Google and Samsung.” While at Virginia Tech, Bowman studied “topics of three-dimensional user interface design and the benefits of immersion in virtual environments.” IBT adds that he also previously worked “as a user experience consultant for Disney Imagineering, working on the company’s theme park rides.”

Venture Beat  (1/22, Grubb) reports Apple is “getting even more serious about VR and AR, which are markets that could generate as much as $120 billion in revenue by 2020.”

CNET News  (1/22, Tong) reports Bowman joins Apple after going on sabbatical from Virginia Tech.

TIME  (1/22, Eadicicco), PC World  (1/24), Fast Company  (1/22, Grothaus), The Next Web  (1/22), The Daily Mail  (1/22, Prigg), and Ars Technica  (1/22) also report on the story.

Industry News

Experts: Cyber Threats Not Catastrophic, But Security Mechanisms Require Improvement.

In an extensive 1,554-word article, CSO Magazine  (1/21, Armerding) covered the debate concerning whether the US, especially its infrastructure, is vulnerable to “catastrophic” cyber security threats and highlighted the opinions of Robert M. Lee, cofounder of Dragos Security, and Jeremy Scott, senior research analyst at Solutionary, who contend that, while cyber security risks are by no means catastrophic, the threats are genuine and make develop into more critical threats over time if hostile parties develop their skills or engineer committed attacks. All experts quoted concurred that, regardless of the current threat level, the mechanisms and policies behind US cyber security require improvement.

Top Executives Leave Twitter In “Major Shakeup.”

The Washington Post  (1/25, Tsukayama) reports that late on Sunday Twitter announced a “major shakeup,” with top executives leaving the company, including: “senior vice president of engineering Alex Roetter, vice president of human resources Skip Schipper, vice president of global media Katie Stanton, senior vice president of product Kevin Weil and Vine general manager Jason Toff.” Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said each executive chose to leave, but none indicated future plans.

Amazon Provides Details On UAV Delivery Program.

Quartz  (1/21, Purdy) reports that Amazon’s “quest for 30-minute delivery by drone doesn’t just face an uphill battle with regulators, who in the US and elsewhere are still grappling with the challenge of ensuring airspace is kept safe in the age of unmanned shipment services.” Quartz adds that consumers have also expressed concerns about noise levels, privacy, and the associated dangers from crashing drones. Paul Misener, Amazon’s vice president for global public policy, said during a recent interview with Yahoo Tech’s David Pogue “that sound-dampening is one of the ‘cool’ engineering challenges that Amazon’s drone program – dubbed Amazon Prime Air – will tackle.” He also said that these aircraft apparently will be sporting “sense-and-avoid technology.”

Engineering and Public Policy

FAA: Nearly 300,000 Drones Registered.

The Hill  (1/22, Laing) reports the FAA “said Friday that nearly 300,000 drones have been registered thus far under new rules that require users to provide their information to the federal government and pay a fee to fly the devices.” Transportation Secretary Foxx said, “I am pleased the public responded to our call to register. … The National Airspace System is a great resource and all users of it, including [Unmanned Aircraft Systems] users, are responsible for keeping it safe.”

New Mexico, DOE Agree On $74M In Settlements Over WIPP Radiation Leak.

The AP  (1/22, Bryan) reported the state of New Mexico and the DOE have reached settlements in the amount of $74 million for radiation leaks at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant from improperly packaged containers from Los Alamos National Lab. The settlements include “millions of dollars toward road improvements and environmental projects in New Mexico.” Ryan Flynn, the New Mexico Environment Department Secretary called it “unprecedented,” saying it was a “good deal” for the state. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz “said Friday in a statement that he’s pleased to have resolved the permit violations at the lab and the repository so DOE can focus on resuming operations.” Moniz stated, “The projects we are funding as part of this settlement are important investments in the health and safety of New Mexicans who work at or live nearby DOE facilities.” Atomic City Underground  (1/22, Munger) reported New Mexico Gov. Susan Martinez stated, “The funds New Mexico will receive through this agreement will help ensure the future safety and success of these facilities, the people who work at them, and their local communities. We look forward to continuing to work with the federal government to ensure the safety and success of both LANL and WIPP.”

The Albuquerque (NM) Journal  (1/22, Villagran) reports that “the settlement also reiterates numerous corrective actions that LANL and WIPP must complete to resolve permit violations.” The Carlsbad (NM) Current-Argus  (1/22, Matott) reported that last Wednesday, the Energy Department “announced that full operations at WIPP are not expected to resume until December 2016.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Indianapolis Robotics Competition Spurs Interest In STEM.

The Indianapolis Star  (1/24, Buckley) reported on 180 teams of Indianapolis school students competing in the fourth annual VEX Robotics Championship, “a city-wide contest pioneered by former Mayor Greg Ballard to promote youth interest in science, technology, engineering and math.” The students were tasked with designing and building a robot that could play in a series of games involving foam balls. Mayor Joe Hogsett lauded Ballard’s work to “promote STEM education in city schools amid a growing national emphasis on cultivating an interest in math and science in students at an early age.”

Senior Math Teacher Ensures Students Understand “Each Step” In Solving Problems.

The Washington Post  (1/24, Stein) profiles Washington DC teacher Mary Johnson, an 81-year-old math educator who recently copyrighted a test to assess gaps in students’ math education. Johnson says, “I believe all students can learn math if they understand the laws. If a student masters a problem on my test, I don’t care what test they take, they master it.” Johnson’s approach to math education relies on “drilling in the basic concepts of math” so that “students understand why each step of solving a problem is necessary.” The article describes how Johnson knew she would become a teacher at a young age when she would finish her textbooks early in the year and help other students in her classes understand the subject matter.

Iowa Teachers Embracing Creative Problem Solving In Math Education.

The AP  (1/23, Becker) reports Iowa teachers are changing the way they teach math by using real-world examples to help students visualize the problems. Sageville Elementary School teacher Ann Johnson asks her students to imagine packing 30 candy canes in boxes that can only hold two each, and then asks how many boxes they need. Johnson says, “We’re celebrating all strategies” for students solving problems. The public schools in Dubuque use the Math Trailblazers curriculum that encourages students to solve problems in different ways by using conceptual thinking.

Illinois Elementary School Robotics Team Qualifies For International Championship In Kentucky.

The Naperville (IL) Sun  (1/24) reports a student team from Longwood Elementary School in Naperville, Illinois qualified to attend the world robotics championship in Louisville, Kentucky after winning the Illinois state championship. Coach Paul Stagaman said, “The kids did a great job. I couldn’t be more proud of them.” School officials are now reviewing family schedules and costs before deciding whether the team will attend the championship.

Florida School District Will Allow All Students To Learn Coding.

The Lakeland (FL) Ledger  (1/24, Drumm) reports a Florida school district is implementing a new curriculum that will allow students in all grades to learn about coding. Lakes Wales Charter Schools Superintendent Jesse Jackson says, “To me, coding is an empowering tool” because it prepares students for future careers and makes technology something that’s helpful rather than something to be afraid of. Jackson and 29 teachers have volunteered to learn how to build websites with HTML and CSS. The article highlights several teachers who are learning about coding and are excited to pass on their new knowledge to their students. The Florida legislature is currently considering bills that would mandate high schools offer courses on computer programming.

Robotics Team Wins Regional Championship In New York.

The Rome (NY) Sentinel  (1/24) reports the RoboSpartans FIRST Tech Challenge robotics team won the Excelsior Region Championship at SUNY Polytechnic Institute. The team was awarded the “Promote Award” and the “Inspire Award” after leading the winning alliance at the competition.

Massachusetts Governor Proposes Increased Funding For Career And Technical Education.

The Fitchburg (MA) Sentinel and Enterprise  (1/22, Metzger) reports Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker has proposed increasing funding for career and technical education by $83.5 million. Baker spoke at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston saying, “It’s an area we clearly want to make investments in.” Most of the funding would be used to give grants to schools to buy new equipment and expand facilities. The Worcester (MA) Telegram & Gazette  (1/24) adds that Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce President Tim Murray told the governor that he has toured many high school programs and knew that there were at least 3,000 students on waiting lists to get into such programs.

Friday’s Lead Stories

EPA Issues Emergency Order Over Flint Water Crisis, EPA Regional Chief Resigns.
Senate Democrats Propose Legislative Fixes For Student Loan Debt.
Raytheon To Support DARPA Infantry Tech Research.
Silicon Valley, Howard University Work Together To Increase Racial Diversity In Technology Sector.
Future Of Bombardier C Series Now In Doubt After Boeing Secures United Order.
Court Refuses To Block “Clean Power Plan.”
BAE Systems Provides STEM Grant To High School District.

Leading the News

WPost And NYTimes A1: Government Neglect Responsible For Flint’s Water Crisis.

A Washington Post  (1/24, A1, Bernstein, Dennis) analysis says, “The scale of government neglect in the water crisis in Flint, Mich., could place the city alongside some of the most infamous environmental disasters in US history.” According to the Post, none of the apologies and resignations “will quickly repair the deep, pervasive damage to the public’s trust in government, say experts and others involved in the crisis.”

In a 2,364-word front-page article, the New York Times  (1/23, A1, Goodnough, Davey, Smith, Subscription Publication) says “interviews, documents and emails show that as every major decision was made over more than a year, officials at all levels of government acted in ways that contributed to the public health emergency and allowed it to persist for months.” The Times adds, “through it all, officials persisted in playing down and dismissing the concerns of Flint residents – one referred to concerned residents groups as ‘anti-everything’ – and authoritatively vouching for the water’s purity, even as they themselves were debating whether it was pure.”

AP: Michigan “Cooperative And Confrontational” With EPA. The AP  (1/23, Schneider, Karoub) reports Keith Creagh, the interim director of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality, was on Friday both “cooperative and confrontational with the US Environmental Protection Agency in a letter pledging to work with the federal government to ensure the safety of Flint’s drinking water but challenging the legality and scope of some federal demands.” In his letter to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, Creagh said Michigan “‘is committed to working’ with her department and Flint to deal with the city’s lead-contamination problem,” but argues Thursday’s Federal order fails to “reference the tens of millions of dollars expended by … the state for water filters, drinking water, testing and medical services.”

Higher Education

Amenities, Flagging State Support Contribute To Rising College Costs.

The Washington Post  (1/22, Selingo) reports that while researchers say there are many contributing factors causing the cost of college attendance to greatly outpace inflation, a new report from the Delta Cost Project has released a study pointing the finger at “two key reasons.” The piece reports that students are demanding “more services outside the classroom and colleges are providing more amenities to attract applicants.” Meanwhile, states are reducing funding support for public colleges.

Rhode Island Governor Criticized For Use Of College Endowment Funds For Political Purposes.

The AP  (1/24, O’Brien) reports Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo is being criticized for her use of Rhode Island College Foundation funds to “advance her policy agenda.” The foundation hired a new chief innovation officer at the direction of Raimondo and was planning to pay for the Governor to visit the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, but criticism from donors stopped that plan from moving forward. Some state lawmakers have criticized Raimondo for using the foundation’s funds for political purposes. State Senator Paul Jabour says, “The one thing that doesn’t look good is that if you take money from the foundation it’s not subject to public record. There’s a transparency issue there.”

From ASEE
International Association of Continuing Engineering Education
Call for papers for May 17-20 conference in Porto, Portugal. January 31 deadline.

Surmounting the Barriers
The joint NAE-ASEE report makes recommendations for breaking down long-identified barriers to diversity in higher education.

Research and Development

Scientists Seek To Reduce Costs Of Smart Windows.

Engadget  (1/23, Moon) reported that researchers at MIT have devised “an equation that can predict how light goes through a rubber-like polymer structure” using a “rubbery material…called polydimethylsiloxane” that “has dark regions when at rest but gets more and more transparent” when stretched. Digital Trends  (1/22, McGrath) reported that scientists at the “University of Texas at Austin’s McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering are also working on making smart windows cheaper” using “an electrochromic material that blocks 90 percent of near-infrared rays and 80 percent of the sun’s visible light” controllable by the user. Press Trust of India  (1/22) also offered coverage.

Apple Hires Virtual Reality Prof. Doug Bowman.

The Wall Street Journal  (1/22, Nicas) reports Apple has hired Doug Bowman, a top virtual-reality research who is a computer-science professor at Virginia Tech, where he leads the Center for Human-Computer Interaction. Bowman has reportedly won awards for his research in virtual and augmented reality. The Journal adds that Apple’s hire of Bowman signals the company is studying advance technologies.

International Business Times  (1/22) reports the hire of Doug Bowman signals Apple’s attempt to “catch up with efforts from Facebook, Microsoft, Google and Samsung.” While at Virginia Tech, Bowman studied “topics of three-dimensional user interface design and the benefits of immersion in virtual environments.” IBT adds that he also previously worked “as a user experience consultant for Disney Imagineering, working on the company’s theme park rides.”

Venture Beat  (1/22, Grubb) reports Apple is “getting even more serious about VR and AR, which are markets that could generate as much as $120 billion in revenue by 2020.”

CNET News  (1/22, Tong) reports Bowman joins Apple after going on sabbatical from Virginia Tech.

TIME  (1/22, Eadicicco), PC World  (1/24), Fast Company  (1/22, Grothaus), The Next Web  (1/22), The Daily Mail  (1/22, Prigg), and Ars Technica  (1/22) also report on the story.

Industry News

Experts: Cyber Threats Not Catastrophic, But Security Mechanisms Require Improvement.

In an extensive 1,554-word article, CSO Magazine  (1/21, Armerding) covered the debate concerning whether the US, especially its infrastructure, is vulnerable to “catastrophic” cyber security threats and highlighted the opinions of Robert M. Lee, cofounder of Dragos Security, and Jeremy Scott, senior research analyst at Solutionary, who contend that, while cyber security risks are by no means catastrophic, the threats are genuine and make develop into more critical threats over time if hostile parties develop their skills or engineer committed attacks. All experts quoted concurred that, regardless of the current threat level, the mechanisms and policies behind US cyber security require improvement.

Top Executives Leave Twitter In “Major Shakeup.”

The Washington Post  (1/25, Tsukayama) reports that late on Sunday Twitter announced a “major shakeup,” with top executives leaving the company, including: “senior vice president of engineering Alex Roetter, vice president of human resources Skip Schipper, vice president of global media Katie Stanton, senior vice president of product Kevin Weil and Vine general manager Jason Toff.” Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said each executive chose to leave, but none indicated future plans.

Amazon Provides Details On UAV Delivery Program.

Quartz  (1/21, Purdy) reports that Amazon’s “quest for 30-minute delivery by drone doesn’t just face an uphill battle with regulators, who in the US and elsewhere are still grappling with the challenge of ensuring airspace is kept safe in the age of unmanned shipment services.” Quartz adds that consumers have also expressed concerns about noise levels, privacy, and the associated dangers from crashing drones. Paul Misener, Amazon’s vice president for global public policy, said during a recent interview with Yahoo Tech’s David Pogue “that sound-dampening is one of the ‘cool’ engineering challenges that Amazon’s drone program – dubbed Amazon Prime Air – will tackle.” He also said that these aircraft apparently will be sporting “sense-and-avoid technology.”

Engineering and Public Policy

FAA: Nearly 300,000 Drones Registered.

The Hill  (1/22, Laing) reports the FAA “said Friday that nearly 300,000 drones have been registered thus far under new rules that require users to provide their information to the federal government and pay a fee to fly the devices.” Transportation Secretary Foxx said, “I am pleased the public responded to our call to register. … The National Airspace System is a great resource and all users of it, including [Unmanned Aircraft Systems] users, are responsible for keeping it safe.”

New Mexico, DOE Agree On $74M In Settlements Over WIPP Radiation Leak.

The AP  (1/22, Bryan) reported the state of New Mexico and the DOE have reached settlements in the amount of $74 million for radiation leaks at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant from improperly packaged containers from Los Alamos National Lab. The settlements include “millions of dollars toward road improvements and environmental projects in New Mexico.” Ryan Flynn, the New Mexico Environment Department Secretary called it “unprecedented,” saying it was a “good deal” for the state. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz “said Friday in a statement that he’s pleased to have resolved the permit violations at the lab and the repository so DOE can focus on resuming operations.” Moniz stated, “The projects we are funding as part of this settlement are important investments in the health and safety of New Mexicans who work at or live nearby DOE facilities.” Atomic City Underground  (1/22, Munger) reported New Mexico Gov. Susan Martinez stated, “The funds New Mexico will receive through this agreement will help ensure the future safety and success of these facilities, the people who work at them, and their local communities. We look forward to continuing to work with the federal government to ensure the safety and success of both LANL and WIPP.”

The Albuquerque (NM) Journal  (1/22, Villagran) reports that “the settlement also reiterates numerous corrective actions that LANL and WIPP must complete to resolve permit violations.” The Carlsbad (NM) Current-Argus  (1/22, Matott) reported that last Wednesday, the Energy Department “announced that full operations at WIPP are not expected to resume until December 2016.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Indianapolis Robotics Competition Spurs Interest In STEM.

The Indianapolis Star  (1/24, Buckley) reported on 180 teams of Indianapolis school students competing in the fourth annual VEX Robotics Championship, “a city-wide contest pioneered by former Mayor Greg Ballard to promote youth interest in science, technology, engineering and math.” The students were tasked with designing and building a robot that could play in a series of games involving foam balls. Mayor Joe Hogsett lauded Ballard’s work to “promote STEM education in city schools amid a growing national emphasis on cultivating an interest in math and science in students at an early age.”

Senior Math Teacher Ensures Students Understand “Each Step” In Solving Problems.

The Washington Post  (1/24, Stein) profiles Washington DC teacher Mary Johnson, an 81-year-old math educator who recently copyrighted a test to assess gaps in students’ math education. Johnson says, “I believe all students can learn math if they understand the laws. If a student masters a problem on my test, I don’t care what test they take, they master it.” Johnson’s approach to math education relies on “drilling in the basic concepts of math” so that “students understand why each step of solving a problem is necessary.” The article describes how Johnson knew she would become a teacher at a young age when she would finish her textbooks early in the year and help other students in her classes understand the subject matter.

Iowa Teachers Embracing Creative Problem Solving In Math Education.

The AP  (1/23, Becker) reports Iowa teachers are changing the way they teach math by using real-world examples to help students visualize the problems. Sageville Elementary School teacher Ann Johnson asks her students to imagine packing 30 candy canes in boxes that can only hold two each, and then asks how many boxes they need. Johnson says, “We’re celebrating all strategies” for students solving problems. The public schools in Dubuque use the Math Trailblazers curriculum that encourages students to solve problems in different ways by using conceptual thinking.

Illinois Elementary School Robotics Team Qualifies For International Championship In Kentucky.

The Naperville (IL) Sun  (1/24) reports a student team from Longwood Elementary School in Naperville, Illinois qualified to attend the world robotics championship in Louisville, Kentucky after winning the Illinois state championship. Coach Paul Stagaman said, “The kids did a great job. I couldn’t be more proud of them.” School officials are now reviewing family schedules and costs before deciding whether the team will attend the championship.

Florida School District Will Allow All Students To Learn Coding.

The Lakeland (FL) Ledger  (1/24, Drumm) reports a Florida school district is implementing a new curriculum that will allow students in all grades to learn about coding. Lakes Wales Charter Schools Superintendent Jesse Jackson says, “To me, coding is an empowering tool” because it prepares students for future careers and makes technology something that’s helpful rather than something to be afraid of. Jackson and 29 teachers have volunteered to learn how to build websites with HTML and CSS. The article highlights several teachers who are learning about coding and are excited to pass on their new knowledge to their students. The Florida legislature is currently considering bills that would mandate high schools offer courses on computer programming.

Robotics Team Wins Regional Championship In New York.

The Rome (NY) Sentinel  (1/24) reports the RoboSpartans FIRST Tech Challenge robotics team won the Excelsior Region Championship at SUNY Polytechnic Institute. The team was awarded the “Promote Award” and the “Inspire Award” after leading the winning alliance at the competition.

Massachusetts Governor Proposes Increased Funding For Career And Technical Education.

The Fitchburg (MA) Sentinel and Enterprise  (1/22, Metzger) reports Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker has proposed increasing funding for career and technical education by $83.5 million. Baker spoke at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston saying, “It’s an area we clearly want to make investments in.” Most of the funding would be used to give grants to schools to buy new equipment and expand facilities. The Worcester (MA) Telegram & Gazette  (1/24) adds that Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce President Tim Murray told the governor that he has toured many high school programs and knew that there were at least 3,000 students on waiting lists to get into such programs.

Friday’s Lead Stories

EPA Issues Emergency Order Over Flint Water Crisis, EPA Regional Chief Resigns.
Senate Democrats Propose Legislative Fixes For Student Loan Debt.
Raytheon To Support DARPA Infantry Tech Research.
Silicon Valley, Howard University Work Together To Increase Racial Diversity In Technology Sector.
Future Of Bombardier C Series Now In Doubt After Boeing Secures United Order.
Court Refuses To Block “Clean Power Plan.”
BAE Systems Provides STEM Grant To High School District.

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