Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier launches PharmaPendium DMPK solution
Elsevier, the information analytics company specialising in science and health, has launched the PharmaPendium DMPK (Drug Metabolism-Pharmacokinetic) solution. The DMPK solution delivers searchable pharmacokinetic, metabolising enzymes and transporters data to provide a complete picture of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and drug candidate risk assessment.
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 Clarivate Analytics and Royal Philips renew long-standing partnership
Clarivate Analytics has renewed its partnership with Royal Philips through a multi-year agreement. Through this partnership, Royal Philips’ Intellectual Property and Standards organisation uses Derwent Innovation, helping create and protect Royal Philips’ intellectual property. Derwent Innovation is the premier IP research and analytics tool based on the Derwent World Patents Index.
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 ACS titles post impressive Impact Factors
The peer-reviewed journals of the American Chemical Society (ACS) are once again the most-cited and/or most-impactful scientific journals across 14 scientific categories, including six core chemistry categories, according to the 2016 Journal Citation Reports (JCR), released on June 14, 2017, by Clarivate Analytics. The citation-based rankings underscore the visibility and value of the broad research published within the Society’s preeminent portfolio of journals.
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 IET announce significant increases in impact factors across journal portfolio
The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) has announced that titles in its journal portfolio have seen a significant increase in their impact factor rating in the latest Journal Citation Reports (JCR). On average, impact factors across all eligible titles have increased by 45%.
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 COAR member-only webinar – DSpace-CRIS: How to Bring Repositories and CRIS/RIMS Together
COAR Member-Only webinar: DSpace-CRIS: How to Bring Repositories and CRIS/RIMS Together will take place on July 10 at 9:30 am CEST. Interested parties may register by July 7, 2017.
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 goBalto, Inc. partners with Citeline to integrate data from Citeline’s intelligence platforms with goBalto’s Select
goBalto, Inc., a provider of cloud-based clinical study startup (SSU) solutions, has announced its partnership with Citeline, part of Informa’s Pharma Intelligence vertical, to integrate data from Citeline’s intelligence platforms — including Trialtrove and Sitetrove — with goBalto’s Select. By incorporating data from Citeline into Select, mutual Citeline and goBalto clients can now easily and efficiently identify ideal sites at which to conduct their clinical trials.
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 PubMatic in deal with Amazon Publisher Services to add PubMatic as monetization partner
PubMatic, the automation solutions company for an open digital media industry, has announced an agreement with Amazon Publisher Services to expand publisher access to programmatic demand through PubMatic’s revenue management platform, SEVEN. This agreement represents the next step in PubMatic’s efforts to ensure that publishers are able to maintain control over their ad decisions.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Tech CEOs Meet With Administration Officials.

Ahead of a meeting Monday with President Trump “on cutting government waste and improving information technology services,” major US tech CEOs met with Trump’s senior adviser Jared Kushner and other top Administration officials, Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Shepardson) reports, adding that Vice President Pence, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin, and Commerce Secretary Ross also met with the executives. Monday’s meeting “comes as the White House pushes to shrink government, cut federal employees and eliminate regulations.” The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(6/19, Kang, Subscription Publication) says the 18 tech executives and investors who attend the meeting included Tim Cook of Apple, Jeff Bezos of Amazon, Satya Nadella of Microsoft, and Eric Schmidt of Alphabet. The Times says it was “another demonstration of the administration’s ability to summon top business executives, even amid controversy.”

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Jackson, Swartz) says “the inaugural meeting of Trump’s American Technology Council,” kicked off “what aides have dubbed a ‘technology week’ of events focused on innovation in the government.” The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Bender, Subscription Publication) reports that Trump called for an overhaul of the government’s outdated computer systems and information technology improvements that would result in more than $1 trillion in savings. Trump told the executives, “Our goal is to lead a sweeping transformation of the federal government’s technology that will deliver dramatically better services for citizens, stronger protection from cyberattacks. … That’s a big problem, no question about it. We’re going to be working on it, and we’re going to solve the problem.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Lucey) says that Kushner, who “tends to keep his mouth shut” and “addresses a meeting when cameras are rolling, preferring to work behind the scenes,” addressed the executives, pledging that “by modernizing these systems we will meaningfully improve the lives of tens of millions of Americans.” The AP piece focuses more on the fact that Kushner spoke publicly than what he actually said, however, saying the mere fact that Kushner spoke in public “counted as news.” Similarly, on NBC Nightly News (6/19, story 6, 2:20), Lester Holt said Kushner’s public comments were “so rare it was likely the first time most Americans had even heard the sound of his voice.”

Also on NBC Nightly News (6/19, story 6, 2:20), Chief White House correspondent Hallie Jackson reported that Monday’s meeting was “part of a massive portfolio” for Kushner that “includes overhauling the federal bureaucracy and Mid-East peace. For that, Kushner will head to Jerusalem and Ramallah this week to jump-start the negotiations with Israelis and Palestinians.”

Tech Leaders Concerned Administration Doesn’t Understand Their Needs On H-1B Visas. McClatchy Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(6/19, Siripurapu) says the tech industry “badly needs high-skilled tech workers and plenty live in other countries – and America’s tech titans are concerned the Trump administration doesn’t understand their needs.” Peter Leroe-Muñoz, vice president of technology and innovation policy for the trade association the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a public policy trade association, “said tech officials have long wanted an increase in H-1B visas.” However, when White House press secretary Sean Spicer was asked Monday if the President was open to expanding the program, he “would only say, ‘We’ve talked a lot about visa reform in the past, and I think the president wants to make sure that he listens to the various people who have interest in this subject.’”

Higher Education

ED Announces Pell Grants Will Be Available Year-Round.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) reports that ED announced on Monday that “Pell Grants for low-income college students can now be used for summer studies” because the starting on July 1, the grants will be available year-round, “allowing students to take summer classes and graduate sooner. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says the decision ‘is about empowering students and giving them the flexibility and support needed to achieve their goals.’”

House To Vote On Perkins Reauthorization Thursday.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) reports House Republicans have scheduled a Thursday vote on “a bipartisan bill that overhauls” the Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, “the main federal law governing funding for career and technical education.” A similar bill cleared the House in the last Congress, but “hit a snag in the Senate as Democrats and Republicans disagreed over provisions that would have curtailed the Education secretary’s authority over how states spend money under the law.”

University Of Utah Trustees Approve Undergraduate Electronic Gaming Degree.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) reports the University of Utah’s board of trustees approved a new electronic gaming undergraduate degree. Pending the Utah State Board of Regents’ approval, the new degree will launch in spring 2018. Roger Altizer, who founded the school’s Entertainment Arts and Engineering department, “says the bachelors will fulfill a growing interest in the subject that’s an increasingly popular and powerful economic force.” The school has offered an electronics gaming masters degree since 2010, and undergraduate students interested in the field have thus far enrolled in classes offered by the School of Computing and Division of Film Studies.

From ASEE
VIDEO – 2017 Global Colloquium in the Azores
This event, September 16-18 (in conjunction with the SEFI Annual Conference), links engineering educators across international borders and brings together lecturers, researchers, and corporate colleagues for an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and perspectives.

VIDEO – 2017 ASEE International Forum at the ASEE Annual Conference
A special registration rate of $150 is available to ASEE Annual Conference Registrants.  This short videohas details of the event, on Wednesday of the conference.

EngineeringCAS Webinar
Learn about the new “common app for engineering graduate schools” in an upcoming free webinar.

Research and Development

Exxon Announces Breakthrough In Development Of Algae-Based Oil Alternative.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Scheyder) reports that Exxon Mobil and Synthetic Genomics announced Monday the discovery of a method to “more than double the amount of lipids produced by algae in a lab,” which could lead to the development a commercially viable alternative to crude oil. Exxon vice president for research and development Vijay Swarup said “algae can be a viable, renewable source for volumes of oil at scale,” adding that the organism is “fast-growing, doesn’t compete for food and water and can grow in all sorts of climates and brackish water.” Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Dlouhy) also reports that the “breakthrough” could facilitate the “widespread commercialization of algae-based biofuels.” Sythentic Genomics co-founder J. Craig Venter said that “to my knowledge, no other group has achieved this level of lipid production by modifying algae,” and the new discovery is the “first super-strong indication that there is a path to getting to where we need to go.” However, Bloomberg suggests that “even with this newest discovery, commercialization of this kind of modified algae is decades away.” The Financial Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Cookson, Subscription Publication) also covers the announcement.

Engineers Build Stretchy Batteries For Wearables.

Scientific American Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Intagliata) reports that researchers have built “bendy and stretchy” silver–zinc batteries, which will allow them to “be more elegantly integrated into future wearable devices.” Alla Zamarayeva, a materials scientist at U.C. Berkeley, and her team used “serpentine designs.” The study is in the journal Science Advances.

Ohio Seeking To Become Key Player In Transportation Research.

The Springfield (OH) News Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Sanctis) reports the Transportation Research Center outside of East Liberty, Ohio has served as a “4,500-acre playground where manufacturers and engineers could test prototypes of the newest sports cars, motorcycles and trucks” for decades. Despite having served “nearly every automaker,” the company is seeking to expand to attract more customers. State and federal agencies are investing more as the state “tries to position itself as a home for transportation manufacturing and research.” The News Sun notes that the city of Columbus won the Smart City Challenge in 2016, which included a $40 million Department of Transportation grant.

Instrument To Study Neutron Stars Installed On ISS.

Spaceflight Now Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Clark) reports that NASA’s Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) has been successfully installed aboard the ISS and is undergoing “alignment checks and test scans, allowing scientists to fine-tune the instrument.” NICER will be used to “learn about the structure and behavior of neutron stars” over the course of its 18-month mission. NICER’s shell contains “56 individual X-ray mirrors…with matching silicon detectors that will register individual photons of X-ray light, measuring their energies and times of arrival.”

Researchers Develop Method To Dope Graphene Molecules With Nitrogen Atoms.

Nanowerk Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) reports researchers from Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research “have now developed a new method to selectively dope graphene molecules with nitrogen atoms.” The pieces says, “By seamlessly stringing together doped and undoped graphene pieces, they were able to form ‘heterojunctions’ in the nanoribbons, thereby fulfilling a basic requirement for electronic current to flow in only one direction when voltage is applied – the first step towards a graphene transistor.” In addition, the team “has successfully managed to remove graphene nanoribbons from the gold substrate on which they were grown and to transfer them onto a non-conductive material.”

Kepler Mission Identifies 219 More Candidate Planets.

SPACE Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Lewin) reports that the Kepler Space Telescope mission has discovered 219 more candidate planets in the Cygnus constellation, “including 10 near-Earth-size planet candidates in the so-called habitable zone around their stars,” bringing the total in Kepler’s catalog to 4,034. Kepler research scientist Susan Thompson said, “This survey catalog will be the foundation for directly answering one of astronomy’s most compelling questions: How many planets like our Earth are actually in the galaxy?”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Overbye, Subscription Publication) quotes mission scientist Natalie Batalha, who said, “The search for planets is the search for life,” and that, “These results will form the basis for future searches for life.” Batalha said that among the candidates is KOI 7711, whose profile nearly matches that of Earth.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19)he Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Kaplan), and The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) also provide coverage.

New Cyber Training Center In Georgia.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) reports, “A new training on the banks of the Savannah River here will help bolster Georgia and Augusta’s status as a cyber intelligence and information security hub, officials said Monday at a groundbreaking ceremony.” The Georgia Cyber Innovation and Training Center “will become the state’s centerpiece for cyber security research and development” and “will merge public and private sector security research and serve the workforce needs of the U.S. Army.”

Workforce

Alaska Airlines To Increase Effort To Prepare For Upcoming Technician Shortage.

Aviation Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Canaday) reports Alaska Airlines plans to increase its use of military-to-corporate transition programs and to do a better job looking for talented technicians coming from MRO shops and its partnership with A&P schools in order to make sure it’s prepared for the anticipated shortage of technicians within the aviation industry. Kurt Kinder, Alaska Airlines’ Vice President of Maintenance and Engineering, said that they’ve “been strategic with hiring and so far haven’t experienced a technician shortage.” However, Kinder says they “see it coming.”

Global Developments

Israel To Build Quantum Communications Tech Lab.

ZDNet Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) reports Israel’s Hebrew University will be home to “a new research push focused on developing quantum computing communications systems.” Hebrew University says the national quantum communications system “paves the way for massive improvements in computational speed and secure communication.” The goal of the project “is not to introduce quantum theory into consumer and home products. Rather, it is hoped the scheme will result in a government communication system that cannot be compromised for the purposes of eavesdropping or spying and will also protect data transfers alongside the country’s critical infrastructure.”

Industry News

Amazon Go’s Director Of Technology Leaves Company.

Re/code Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Del Ray) reports one of Amazon’s executives responsible for developing the “store of the future with no cashiers,” Amazon Go, has left the company for a role at a startup. Bali Raghavan “has joined the heavily funded real estate startup Opendoor as its vice president of engineering.” The Amazon Go concept “uses a combination of sensors, cameras and, sometimes, behind-the-scenes humans, too, to bill shoppers for the items they pull from shelves, without them having to stop and check out before leaving the store.” However, the opening of the store was delayed due to tech problems “that arose when the shop was too crowded or an item was moved on a shelf.” Two people familiar with Raghavan’s departure “told Recode that it was not related to the store’s early issues.”

Boeing Announces Data Analytics Division, Five Agreements.

Aviation Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Fuller) reports Boeing announced Boeing AnalytX as the name of its data analytics capabilities at the Paris Air Show. Boeing said the new division “unites existing analytics services and products across Boeing’s commercial, defense and services businesses, its research and information technology capabilities and its family of companies.” Ted Colbert, CIO and SVP of information and analytics, said, “Through the products Boeing AnalytX powers, we are applying scientific processes to data to solve our customers’ most pressing problems today while creating a world of limitless possibilities for the future.” Boeing also announced five AnalytX agreements with AirBridgeCargo, China Airlines, Delta, Korean Air, and Turkish Airlines.

Engineering and Public Policy

Perry: CO2 Not Prime Climate Change Driver.

Energy Secretary Rick Perry told CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) yesterday during an interview on “Squawk Box” that “he does not believe carbon dioxide emissions from human activity are the main driver of climate change,” joining EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt “in casting doubt on the conclusion of some of the government’s top scientists.” When asked if carbon emissions are the prime driver of climate change, Perry said, “No, most likely the primary control knob is the ocean waters and this environment that we live in. … The fact is this shouldn’t be a debate about, ‘Is the climate changing, is man having an effect on it?’ Yeah, we are. The question should be just how much, and what are the policy changes that we need to make to effect that?” Perry’s comments are “at odds with the conclusion of NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.” The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Matthew Daly |, Ap) reports Perry said, “This idea that science is just absolutely settled and if you don’t believe it’s settled then you’re somehow another Neanderthal, that is so inappropriate from my perspective.” The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Siciliano) reports Perry said. “If you are going to be a wise, intellectually engaged person, being a skeptic about these issues is quite all right.”

Greenwire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Subscription Publication) called Perry’s comments yesterday morning “his most detailed on the subject since becoming Energy secretary, and come a week after the agency confirmed it was closing its international climate office.” The agency said it was “looking for ways to consolidate the many duplicative programs that currently exist.” The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Henry) reports the Energy Department, which Perry heads up, “is charged, in part, with researching technologies designed to green the energy sector, a leading producer of emissions.” The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Mufson) reports the former Texas governor “has long avoided getting pinned down on mankind’s contribution to climate change, and he has said that action on climate change should be weighed against economic costs.”

The Dallas Morning News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Benning, Bureau) reports Perry’s comments on CNBC “drew immediate blowback from environmental groups.” Liz Perera, climate policy director for The Sierra Club, said, “Rick Perry’s outrageous comments are the latest indication that this administration will do everything in its power to put polluter profits ahead of science and public health.” The Seattle Post-Intelligencer Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Connelly) reports when “pressed” by Sen. Maria Cantwell, during his confirmation hearing, “Perry promised to ‘protect all the science’ being conducted by the Department of Energy.” Cantwell on Monday “lamented” that his “promise was not kept.” Cantwell stated, “His comments this morning that ignore the reality of climate change were profoundly disappointing, and wrong. … What’s worse, he plans to defend a budget this week that shutters a climate office, and cuts the biological and environmental research program at DOE – key to its climate portfolio – almost in half.”

TAMEST Study Links Shale Drilling, Air Pollution, Earthquakes.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Hunn) reports a new study from the Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas found that oil and gas drilling in the state’s shale basins pollutes the air, erodes the soil and contaminates the air, while disposing of the wastewater causes earthquakes. The scientists found that the shale boom “degraded natural resources, overwhelmed small communities, and even boosted the frequency and severity of traffic collisions as workers and equipment rush to oil fields.” The study also clarified that surface spills are the most likely drinking water contaminants, rather than fracking, and that contamination between oil reservoirs and freshwater aquifers is unlikely. There is also little evidence to connect shale production emissions to health effects. The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(6/19) reports the group started its analysis two years ago with a task force consisting of “attorneys, geologists, seismologists and engineers, including representatives from oil companies and an environmental group.” The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Hunn) reports the task force chair Christine Ehlig-Economides, a former Schlumberger petroleum engineer, said that scientists, regulators and politicians need to understand the environmental risks of shale drilling before air pollution or water contamination leads to regulations that could derail the industry. She said, “We really do thrive on the availability of energy in the United States. … Where there are things that could threaten the future for this kind of development, those are the things we really must address.” The Dallas Morning News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Mosier) reports the study proposed 25 recommendations, many calling for new research. The commission wants to study the effects of exposure to drilling emissions, find whether Texas needs a law to protect surface owners who do not own their mineral rights, and discover the use of brackish water in fracking.

DOE Says Nuclear Power Is Key Part Of Trump Administration Energy Strategy.

During an interview on CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19), Energy Secretary Rick Perry signaled that “the Trump administration sees nuclear power as ‘a very important part’ of an all-of-the-above energy strategy.” Perry stated, “Bringing our nuclear energy industry back, small modular reactors for instance, that’s on the front burner so to speak.” His “comment offers some insight into the administration’s spending priorities as it seeks to slash funding for Energy’s research and development programs by 54 percent.” CNBC adds that “offices that would see deep cuts — unless Congress intervenes — include those responsible for promoting energy efficiency and extending the life of nuclear power plants.” DOE “has promoted research into the small modular reactors that Perry mentioned.”

Scientists Debate Role Of Renewables In US Energy Grid.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Mooney) reports on a debate within the scientific community over how much of the United States’ power it can get from renewable sources. Stanford professor Mark Jacobson claims that by 2055, “the U.S. could be entirely powered by ‘clean’ energy sources and ‘no natural gas, biofuels, nuclear power, or stationary batteries are needed.’” However, 21 researchers have published a study contesting Jacobson’s work, claiming he used “invalid modeling tools, contained modeling errors, and made implausible and inadequately supported assumptions.”

New England Struggles With Risk Of Overtaxed Natural Gas Pipelines.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Kamp, Subscription Publication) reports that natural gas-fired generation in New England has increased exponentially in the past decade, which has taxed the pipelines that supply the region. Increasing pipeline capacity has proven difficult due to permitting delays and public opposition. Next year the regional grid operator plans to implement a new program that will offer financial rewards to generators that continue to operate even when the system is taxed. Meanwhile, some experts are recommending that New England rely on backup oil to run power plants until renewable energy gains a stronger foothold.

Elementary/Secondary Education

National Society Of Black Engineers Hosts Birmingham Summer Camp.

Alabama Live Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) highlights the “Summer Engineer Experience for Kids (SEEK)” camp being hosted by the National Society of Black Engineers and Alabama Power in Birmingham this month, a free event for third through fifth-grade students featuring hands-on activities meant to boost their interest in science, technology and engineering. The camp in Birmingham is one of 15 across the country, which combined represent “the nation’s largest summer engineering program geared toward African-American students.” Students will also “be able to engage with real engineers and mentors, which is key to increasing African American representation in STEM.” SEEK site director Janet Jones-Fields said the program can also help dispel the “thug stereotype” that many minority students face.

Chemical Education Foundation Hosts Chemistry Challenge.

The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Ayers) reports the nonprofit Chemical Education Foundation hosted its nationwide “You Be the Chemist National Challenge” on Monday, enabling “42 fifth- to eighth-graders to showcase their scientific knowledge in a format similar to that of a spelling bee.” The foundation’s senior manager, Emily Belson, said the grand prize “champion receives a $12,000 educational scholarship,” and “the three runners-up receive scholarships as well.” CEF executive Bryan Stattler “said STEM innovation in elementary and middle school is vital to the health of the economy.” Stattler explained, “From a research perspective, if we are able to connect with elementary and middle-school students and get them interested in science, they are much more likely to continue in it. But middle school is where we lose people.” The Times notes a National Science Foundation report found only 16 percent of high school graduates consider STEM field majors in college.

Female Astronaut Recruit Encourages Girls To Risk Failure.

Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) profiles Kayla Barron, a US Navy lieutenant and one of five women and one of 12 recruits selected for NASA’s next class of astronaut candidates. Barron was selected “from the biggest-ever pool of applicants: 18,300.” In “a message for any girls who might want to add to that number, especially those interested in science, technology, engineering, and math fields,” Barron stressed the importance of learning to risk failure and moving on from those failures to achieve.

South Dakota Students Participate In Drone Camp.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19, Emerson) reports Brad Strangeland and Tim Meyer taught 25 students “everything from drone safety to learning the characteristics of flight to building Lego drones” at a two-day Bismarck Public Schools Career Academy camp in South Dakota. Strangeland is an instructor at the Career Academy’s aviation program, which teaches students “what it takes to become a pilot, as well as other career paths.” He said interest in the aviation programs is growing, and participation doubled this school year compared to last year. The AP notes that the two-day drone camp was sponsored by a $75,000 Tesoro grant awarded for STEM-related activities.

Monday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 ASTM International Spectroscopy Group seeks participation for updating informatics standard for labs
Anyone is invited to join efforts to update ASTM International’s well-known standard that helps labs optimise operations through IT applications. The committee on molecular spectroscopy and separation science (E13) is seeking participation from a wide segment of users, vendors, and other stakeholders to update the standard, known as the Standard Guide for Laboratory Informatics (E1578).
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 APA targets online piracy websites to curtail unauthorized publication of journal articles
The American Psychological Association has announced that it is targeting online piracy websites and not individual authors in its efforts to curtail the unauthorised sharing on the internet of articles published in the association’s journals. The move – a change to a recently launched pilot program – came in response to concerns voiced by some authors who were surprised to hear from their academic institutions that they should remove final APA copyrighted articles from their websites.
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 ACMG’s journal Genetics in Medicine now in top 2.5% of all indexed journals
The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) has announced that the Thomson ReutersImpact Factor Journal Citation Reports has just increased the impact factor of the ACMG’s peer-reviewed medical genetics and genomics journal, Genetics in Medicine (GIM) to 8.229 for 2016, up from 7.710 in 2015.Genetics in Medicine is published by Springer Nature.
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 JoVE launches new Physics Series
JoVE, the premier producer and publisher of video resources for scientific research and education, has announced the launch of an entirely new Physics Series, as well as a significant expansion of both its Clinical Skills and Psychology Series. The new videos are now available within JoVE Science Education, an innovative library of easy-to-understand video demonstrations that teach key concepts and fundamental techniques.
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 AACC announces rise in impact factor of its journal, Clinical Chemistry
AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organisation dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, has announced that the impact factor of its journal, Clinical Chemistry, has risen to 8.008 in the 2016 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports. This impact factor places Clinical Chemistry in the top 2.6% of 12,062 ranked academic journals and speaks to the significant influence of the science it publishes on laboratory medicine and patient care.
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 Industry initiative for manuscript transfer officially named MECA
The cross-organisational industry initiative previously called Common Manuscript Transfer Protocol has been officially named MECA, which stands for Manuscript Exchange Common Approach. In addition to the project’s name change, other updates include formal launch via a presentation at SSP, and the announcement of a new website.
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 Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Judy Luther and Todd Carpenter (Failure to Deliver: Reaching Users in an Increasingly Mobile World); Davy Falkner (How do researchers use social media and scholarly collaboration networks (SCNs)?); Linda Bennett and Annika Bennett (Guest Post, The TEF: How Publishers and Booksellers Can Engage with Higher Education Assessment); Bastian Greshake (A closer look at the Sci-Hub corpus: what is being downloaded and from where?); and EBSCOpost Blog (Public Libraries in Summer: A Great Place to Build Success Skills). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of BlogspeakHere.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

China Makes Major Breakthrough In Quantum Cryptography Research.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Chin, Subscription Publication) reports a team of Chinese scientists published an account of an experiment in the journal Science, describing their success in sending specially linked photons from a satellite to establish an instantaneous connection between two stations on Earth more than 1,200 kilometers apart. Experts say this achievement gives the country an advantage in using quantum technology to construct an “unhackable” global communications network. The Journal says the findings represent a significant breakthrough that makes China a pioneer in its efforts to use the enigmatic properties of matter and energy at the subatomic level. The Pentagon, in an annual report last week, called China’s quantum satellite launch in August a “notable advance in cryptography research.” According to the Journal, while the US has focused on quantum computing, Europe and China have focused on quantum encryption, but Chinese researchers are better equipped with government funds. The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Netburn) provides a Q&A-style explanation of entangled photons, the process by which a satellite emitted them, and the implications of the experiment.

Higher Education

Russia, China Lead Student Teams At The Computer Programming Olympics.

Salon Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18) profiles Alexander Iverson, a 20-year-old South Dakota School of Mines and Technology computer science senior “and a recent competitor in the collegiate ‘Olympics of computer programming.’” South Dakota hosted the event, the 41st annual International Collegiate Programming Contest World Finals, and 133 three-person teams from 44 different nations “competed to answer as many of the 12 computer programming problem sets as they could.” A team from Russia’s St. Petersburg National Research University for Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, won the competition, and Russian and Chinese teams scored in nine of the top 14 spots. Iverson’s team received an honorable mention, the University of Central Florida placed 13th, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology placed 20th. Iverson told Salon “that one of the main reasons he has excelled in an area where other American students haven’t is because of his self-instruction outside of school.”

ED’s Rollback Of For-Profit Regulation, Civil Rights Protections Concerns Student Advocates.

The Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports on the concerns that are being voiced by student advocates over ED’s recent change of “regulations enacted during the Obama administration designed to rein in predatory for-profit colleges” and “changes in how the Office for Civil Rights will investigate complaints.” The piece quotes Center for American Progress Senior Director for Postsecondary Education Ben Miller criticizing the moves. Said Tamara Hiler, senior policy adviser at Third Way, a nonpartisan think tank, “It doesn’t make sense. What we should be doing is making sure we’re protecting students from the schools that are clearly defrauding them or making them worse off than if they hadn’t gone to the institution in the first place.” The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Puzzanghera, Masunaga) reports that ED is suspending Obama-era rules “to make it easier to forgive loans for stranded students and to try to prevent future abuses” from fraudulent for-profit colleges, sparking “criticism from Democrats and student advocates.”

The Inland Valley (CA) Daily Bulletin Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/17) reports, “consumer advocate and education groups have largely criticized the move,” adding that attorneys general from at last nine states have “filed a motion to block the action.” The piece quotes California Attorney General Xavier Becerra saying, “As the founder of the failed Trump University, President Trump knows well how some shady for-profit colleges and universities award useless degrees and prey on students’ and taxpayer’s money. If Secretary DeVos and the Trump Administration won’t protect students, then I will.”

University Of Michigan To Offer Free Tuition To Low-Income Students.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Williams) reported the University of Michigan’s board of regents approved on Tuesday the “Go Blue Guarantee” program. The program will offer free four-year tuition to in-state students from homes with family incomes of less than $65,000 annually, but “will not cover room and board.” The guarantee is slated to start on Jan. 1, and is “part of the school’s $2 billion fiscal year 2018 general fund budget for the Ann Arbor campus.” Board of Regents Chair Mark Bernstein said the program is aimed at increasing the campus’ socio-economic diversity. “There is no question that the talent and the intelligence and hard work is evenly spread across Michigan families, but if you look at who is attending our school it does not represent the state,” Bernstein explained.

From ASEE
PODCAST – Highlights from Columbus, Our Annual Conference Host
Headed to the ASEE Annual in Columbus? Listen to our short podcast where Prism magazine associate editor Jenn Pocock details some of the city’s higlights.

VIDEO – ASEE Annual Conference Highlights
Getting ready for the 2017 ASEE Annual Conference?  Check out ASEE TV 2016 conference highlight videos here.

EngineeringCAS Webinar
Learn about the new “common app for engineering graduate schools” in an upcoming free webinar.

Research and Development

Researchers Create Patch That Could One Day Benefit Heart Attack Patients.

Newsweek Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/17, Firger) reported that researchers “using 3-D printing technology” have “created a patch” that could one day benefit heart attack patients. Researcher Brenda Ogle said, “The concept is to imprint proteins that are native to the body.” Ogle added, “We’ve used stem cell–derived cardiac muscle – cardiac myocytes – and actually mixed those with other cell types needed for blood vessels.” That, “she says, prevents what would otherwise happen naturally: The formation of a different type cells known as fibroblasts, which secrete scar tissue.” Investigators “have successfully tried the patch on mice.” The findings were published in Circulation Research. The findings “were so inspiring that in June 2016 the National Institutes of Health awarded her team a grant of more than $3 million, so they can now give pigs heart attacks and fix them with the patch.”

Bioengineering May Change How Drugs For Cancer And Other Diseases Are Made, Experts Say.

The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/16, Weisman) reported the combination of biology and engineering may lead to a new biomedical revolution with new treatments for cancer and other diseases, according to “a panel of top research and business leaders” at a MIT symposium. The experts said that the combination of biology and engineering may change how drugs are developed, which could lead to more personalized treatments.

NASA Scientists To Announce New Kepler Exoplanet Finds Monday.

In continuing coverage, SPACE Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Emspak) reports that NASA “will announce the latest crop of planet discoveries from the Kepler Space Telescope” Monday morning at 11 am EDT from the Kepler Science Conference. The conference will be livestreamed from NASA’s website and will feature a panel with Kepler program scientist Mario Perez, Kepler research scientist Susan Thompson, NASA Sagan Fellow Courtney Dressing, and University of Hawaii doctoral candidate Benjamin Fulton.

Ohio Airport Awarded State, Federal Grants To Research New UAV Technology.

The Springfield (OH) News Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Brown) reports that the Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport has received new mobile radar equipment and a total of $5 million in state and federal grants that will be used to fly and track UAVs beyond the line of sight. The News Sun adds that “testing will begin in about a month at the Springfield airport and it will later be presented to the FAA once completed.”

Iowa State University Students To Showcase First Solar Utility Vehicle.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Sutter) reports Iowa State University’s solar team, Team PrISUm, is showcasing the first solar utility vehicle, dubbed the Penumbra, on a 99-country “Sun Run” to explain their work and “inspire younger students.” After tour, the team will take the vehicle to Australia to compete in the 2017 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge. The Penumbra can achieve speeds of 35 miles-per-hour on sunny days, and it can reach a top speed near 70 miles-per-hour when supplemented with on-board batteries with a range of up to 200 miles. Team member Bradlee Fair commented, “We’re hoping to shock the world with our practicality. We’re the only team in the world that has the rearview mirror, and the rear window, and some trunk space. And of course, we have some amazing JBL speakers in the car; you have Bluetooth, Google maps, Google music. You can program your playlist specifically for who rides in the car.”

Vanderbilt University Researchers Examine Climate Change In Tennessee.

In a more than 2,100-word article, the Nashville (TN) Ledger Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/16) explored projects launched by Vanderbilt University aimed at understand the impact of climate change in Tennessee. Vanderbilt University research associate professor of civil and environmental engineering Janey Camp and a team of engineers are studying commerce and flood control in Middle Tennessee with the help of a research grant from the Housing and Urban Development Department. Camp is also focused on helping “people understand how the research she is working on at Vanderbilt can apply locally, like in the rapidly growing Nashville area where more hard surfaces means more storm-runoff, which can lead to potential failure of infrastructure or disruption to normal operations.” Meanwhile, Vanderbilt’s Hiba Baroud is leading a National Science Foundation-funded project “focused on using Bayesian statistical modeling to measure and analyze the risk, reliability and resilience in critical infrastructure systems; in particular, to predict outcomes in extreme weather events and models of how communities can most quickly recover.”

Iowa State University Debuts Solar-Powered Car.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Sutter) reports that “the solar vehicle Iowa State University students are showing off across the state doesn’t look a lot like your standard American car.” The AP adds, “The ISU solar team, Team PrISUm, said this is the world’s first solar utility vehicle. And they’re taking it to all 99 counties, explaining their work and hoping to inspire younger students.” The article also states that “the Penumbra, as they call it, can run about 35 mph (about 56 kph) on solar power alone on a sunny day,” and, “its top speed is near 70 mph (about 112 kph), thanks to its onboard batteries.” The article quotes team member Bradlee Fair saying, “our biggest competition is from Germany, the Netherlands and Japan, so we really are racing on the international stage.”

Workforce

Aerospace Companies Recruit Engineers From Race Car Competitions.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/16, Masunaga) reported that “traditional aerospace giants are finding talent in an unlikely place: a college race-car competition.” The Times added, “100 university teams will bring their prototype race cars to the Formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) competition in Lincoln, Neb., where they will be judged on design, manufacturing, performance and business logic.” The article also stated that “the aerospace leaders who help judge the contest say it’s also an opportunity to see students explain design and production decisions, present their business cases and adapt on the fly.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Safety Issues At Los Alamos May Be Setting Back Nuclear Arsenal Update.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, A1, Malone) has a front-page story on how violations of safety rules at Los Alamos National Laboratory have continued in spite of a partial shutdown over the matter four years ago. The New Mexico nuclear lab’s “shortcomings in plutonium safety have been cited in more than 40 reports by government oversight agencies, teams of nuclear safety experts and the lab’s own employees over the past 11 years.” Some say that contractors “have been chasing lucrative government bonuses tied to” safety improvements at the cost of the nuclear program, experts say the US “risks falling behind on an ambitious $1 trillion update of its nuclear arsenal.”

Power Plant On Navajo Nation Land Could Play Role In Keeping Coal Industry Alive.

The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Wolfgang) reports, “An aging power plant in remote Arizona could offer the Trump administration a unique opportunity: the chance to back up its rhetoric about saving the US coal industry with concrete action.” The Bureau of Reclamation owns a 24 percent stake in the Navajo Generating Station, “a coal-fired facility on Navajo Nation land near the Arizona-Utah border.” Its other owners say the station “is no longer economically viable and, as structured, would run at a $100 million annual loss each year after 2019,” but the “mine that feeds the plant sits on Hopi Tribe land, and the tribe depends on coal royalties for about 85 percent of its annual budget.” Coal proponents say the government should ensure that both the mine and the power station stay open.

Comprehensive Study Details Environmental, Social Impacts Of Hydraulic Fracturing In Texas.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Hunn) reported on “the most comprehensive analysis of the environmental and social impacts of drilling and hydraulic fracturing,” recently conducted by The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas. The analysis is “likely to increase the scrutiny of fracking, particularly as a second shale boom gets underway in the Permian Basin,” and may “boost pressure on firms to drill more carefully, keep operations out of populated areas, and consider more environmentally friendly fracking technologies.” The analysis found little evidence linking emissions from shale oil operations to health effects, but was critical of the limited data and lack of a statewide database to track environmental impacts.

Missouri-Based Solar Company Among State’s Fastest Growing Companies.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/18, Gray) reported on Sun Solar, a Missouri-based solar panel company that ranks as one of the state’s fastest-growing businesses. Company founder Caleb Arthur, who identifies as a lifelong Republican, said, “Believe in climate change or not, these jobs are growing at a faster rate.” Moreover, Arthur “doesn’t think solar’s success has to be directly at odds with fossil fuels. Rather, he sees opportunities to ramp up efforts to retrain and hire more workers displaced from that background.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Girl Scouts Announce Cybersecurity Badges.

Yahoo! Finance Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/16, Zarya) reported, “On Thursday, Girl Scouts of the USA announced a new partnership with Palo Alto Networks to create a series of cybersecurity badges. The badges, which will be available starting in 2018, can be earned by girls in grades K-12 who demonstrate mastery of Internet security.” The article noted that “recent research by Accenture and Girls Who Code found that, for girls in middle school (ages 9-11), having a mentor increased the likelihood that a girl would pursue computer science by 16%, and a belief that computer science is ‘for girls’ increased the odds by 25%.” Girl Scouts’ “single-gender, collaborative, mentorship-focused nature makes it a particularly welcoming place for girls’ STEM education.”

Chevron Helps Provide STEM Grants To West Virginia Schools.

WBOY-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Clarksburg, WV (6/15, Conard) reports that Chevron and the Benedum foundation have provided $800,000 in grants to RESA 7, which helps bring resources to rural communities and 17 schools around Clarksburg, West Virginia. The grants are meant to “promote innovation and are focused on STEM: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.” Kathy Hypes from RESA 7 said, “Encourage and enhance the curriculum that is already in place by bringing more innovative solutions to the rural communities which was part of the identification process and bringing these opportunities to children.”

Illinois Students Explore STEM Fields At USPTO-Sponsored “Camp Invention.”

The Northwest (IL) Herald Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/16) reported the US Patent and Trademark Office-supported National Inventors Hall of Fame founded Camp Invention in 1990 to introduce students to the science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM, fields. This “loud cry for innovation” was introduced to Crystal Lake, Illinois in 2002 by Kristin Thorsen, who is now a Camp Director. Last week, 96 students participated in the five-day program. “The curriculum reaches kids in a way that they become so engaged,” Thorsen stated. She added, “They wish that school could be like this all of the time. It offers kids the opportunity to experience all of the STEM fields in a hands-on way where they are inventing and creating during every module of the day.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 165 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 165 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 165 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Combinatory evaluation of transcriptome and metabolome profiles of low temperature-induced resistant ascites syndrome in broiler chickens Shi, S., Shen, Y., Zhang, S., Zhao, Z., Hou, Z., Zhou, H., Zou, J., Guo, Y. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 2389
2 . Persistent spatial structuring of coastal ocean acidification in the California Current System Chan, F., Barth, J.A., Blanchette, C.A., Byrne, R.H., Chavez, F., Cheriton, O., Feely, R.A., Friederich, G., Gaylord, B., Gouhier, T., Hacker, S., Hill, T., Hofmann, G., McManus, M.A., Menge, B.A., Nielsen, K.J., Russell, A., Sanford, E., Sevadjian, J., Washburn, L. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 2526
3 . Relationship of bone mineral density with valvular and annular calcification in community-dwelling older people: The Cardiovascular Health Study Massera, D., Xu, S., Bartz, T.M., Bortnick, A.E., Ix, J.H., Chonchol, M., Owens, D.S., Barasch, E., Gardin, J.M., Gottdiener, J.S., Robbins, J.R., Siscovick, D.S., Kizer, J.R. 2017 Archives of Osteoporosis ,
12 ( 1 ) , art. no. 52
4 . Silencing of the Rice Gene LRR1 Compromises Rice Xa21 Transcript Accumulation and XA21-Mediated Immunity Caddell, D.F., Park, C.-J., Thomas, N.C., Canlas, P.E., Ronald, P.C. 2017 Rice ,
10 ( 1 ) , art. no. 23
5 . Three-Dimensional Geometry of Collagenous Tissues by Second Harmonic Polarimetry Reiser, K., Stoller, P., Knoesen, A. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 2642
6 . The effectiveness of financial purchase incentives for battery electric vehicles – A review of the evidence Hardman, S., Chandan, A., Tal, G., Turrentine, T. 2017 Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews ,
80 pp. 1100 – 1111 .
7 . Efficacy of a heat-spray and heat-double spray process on inoculated nuts with Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 1045 Salazar, F., Garcia, S., Lagunas-Solar, M., Pan, Z., Cullor, J. 2017 Food Control ,
81 pp. 74 – 79 .
8 . Using independent covariates in experimental designs: Quantifying the trade-off between power boost and Type I error inflation Wang, Y.A., Sparks, J., Gonzales, J.E., Hess, Y.D., Ledgerwood, A. 2017 Journal of Experimental Social Psychology ,
72 pp. 118 – 124 .
9 . Deciding where to attend: Large-scale network mechanisms underlying attention and intention revealed by graph-theoretic analysis Liu, Y., Hong, X., Bengson, J.J., Kelley, T.A., Ding, M., Mangun, G.R. 2017 NeuroImage ,
157 pp. 45 – 60 .
10 . The role of pollinators, pests and different yield components for organic and conventional white clover seed yields Lundin, O., Svensson, G.P., Larsson, M.C., Birgersson, G., Hederström, V., Lankinen, Å., Anderbrant, O., Rundlöf, M. 2017 Field Crops Research ,
210 pp. 1 – 8 .
11 . Impact of hepatic P450-mediated biotransformation on the disposition and respiratory tract toxicity of inhaled naphthalene Kovalchuk, N., Kelty, J., Li, L., Hartog, M., Zhang, Q.-Y., Edwards, P., Van Winkle, L., Ding, X. 2017 Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology ,
329 pp. 1 – 8 .
12 . Two-Dimensional Supersonic Thrust Vectoring Using Staggered Ramps Montes, C.F., Davis, R.L. 2017 Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power ,
139 ( 8 ) , art. no. 082605
13 . Early life allergen and air pollutant exposures alter longitudinal blood immune profiles in infant rhesus monkeys Crowley, C.M., Fontaine, J.H., Gerriets, J.E., Schelegle, E.S., Hyde, D.M., Miller, L.A. 2017 Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology ,
328 pp. 60 – 69 .
14 . Impact of synchronization in micromechanical gyroscopes Defoort, M., Taheri-Tehrani, P., Nitzan, S.H., Horsley, D.A. 2017 Journal of Vibration and Acoustics, Transactions of the ASME ,
139 ( 4 ) , art. no. 040906
15 . Two-fluid modeling of cratering in a particle bed by a subsonic turbulent jet LaMarche, C.Q., Morán, A.B., van Wachem, B., Curtis, J.S. 2017 Powder Technology ,
318 pp. 68 – 82 .
16 . Multi-scale streamflow variability responses to precipitation over the headwater catchments in southern China Niu, J., Chen, J., Wang, K., Sivakumar, B. 2017 Journal of Hydrology ,
551 pp. 14 – 28 .
17 . Delivery of anti-inflammatory peptides from hollow PEGylated poly(NIPAM) nanoparticles reduces inflammation in an ex vivo osteoarthritis model McMasters, J., Poh, S., Lin, J.B., Panitch, A. 2017 Journal of Controlled Release ,
258 pp. 161 – 170 .
18 . Temperature and radiation effects at the fluorine K-edge in LiF Schwartz, C.P., Ponce, F., Friedrich, S., Cramer, S.P., Vinson, J., Prendergast, D. 2017 Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena ,
218 pp. 30 – 34 .
19 . Do attitudes cause behavior or vice versa? An alternative conceptualization of the attitude-behavior relationship in travel behavior modeling Kroesen, M., Handy, S., Chorus, C. 2017 Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice ,
101 pp. 190 – 202 .
20 . Immigrants and firms’ outcomes: Evidence from France Mitaritonna, C., Orefice, G., Peri, G. 2017 European Economic Review ,
96 pp. 62 – 82 .
21 . A multi-temporal approach in MaxEnt modelling: A new frontier for land use/land cover change detection Amici, V., Marcantonio, M., La Porta, N., Rocchini, D. 2017 Ecological Informatics ,
40 pp. 40 – 49 .
22 . Policy Change and Recidivism: The Effects of California’s Realignment and Local Implementation Strategies on Rearrest and Reconviction Bird, M., Grattet, R. 2017 Criminal Justice Policy Review ,
28 ( 6 ) pp. 601 – 623 .
23 . The association between psychotic experiences and disability: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys Navarro-Mateu, F., Alonso, J., Lim, C.C.W., Saha, S., Aguilar-Gaxiola, S., Al-Hamzawi, A., Andrade, L.H., Bromet, E.J., Bruffaerts, R., Chatterji, S., Degenhardt, L., de Girolamo, G., de Jonge, P., Fayyad, J., Florescu, S., Gureje, O., Haro, J.M., Hu, C., Karam, E.G., Kovess-Masfety, V., Lee, S., Medina-Mora, M.E., Ojagbemi, A., Pennell, B.-E., Piazza, M., Posada-Villa, J., Scott, K.M., Stagnaro, J.C., Xavier, M., Kendler, K.S., Kessler, R.C., McGrath, J.J., Al-Kaisy, M.S., Benjet, C., Borges, G., Bunting, B., de Almeida, J.M.C., Cardoso, G., Cia, A.H., Demyttenaere, K., He, Y., Hinkov, H., Huang, Y., Karam, A.N., Kawakami, N., Kiejna, A., Lepine, J.-P., Levinson, D., Moskalewicz, J., Piazza, M., Slade, T., Stein, D.J., Have, M.T., Torres, Y., Viana, M.C., Whiteford, H., Williams, D.R., Wojtyniak, B. 2017 Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica ,
136 ( 1 ) pp. 74 – 84 .
24 . Evaluating gain functions in foraging bouts using vertical excursions in northern elephant seals Ferraro, M.S., Decker, R.R., Costa, D.P., Robinson, P.W., Houser, D.S., Crocker, D.E. 2017 Animal Behaviour ,
129 pp. 15 – 24 .
25 . Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI detects changes in vascular transport rate constants following treatment with thermally-sensitive liposomal doxorubicin Fite, B.Z., Kheirolomoom, A., Foiret, J.L., Seo, J.W., Mahakian, L.M., Ingham, E.S., Tam, S.M., Borowsky, A.D., Curry, F.-R.E., Ferrara, K.W. 2017 Journal of Controlled Release ,
256 pp. 203 – 213
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier announces publication of seven new oil and gas industry titles
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of Compositional Grading in Oil and Gas Reservoirs by Rogerio Oliveira Esposito, Pedro Henrique Rodrigues Alijó, Jose Antonio Scilipoti and Frederico Wanderley Tavares. One of seven new oil and gas industry titles, this valuable reference offers instruction, examples and case studies to respond to the challenges of modelling a compositional gradient subject.
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 Clarivate Analytics and the University of Melbourne collaborate to support the ARC Training Centre for Personalized Therapeutics Technologies in advancing Australian biomedical research
Clarivate Analytics has announced its collaboration with the University of Melbourne, which is leading the ARC Training Centre for Personalized Therapeutics Technologies, a collaboration between University of Melbourne, Monash University, University of Western Australia and 15 partner organizations including Clarivate. Funded by the Australian Research Council’s (ARC) Industrial Transformation Training Centres schemes over five years, the Centre is led by Professor Alastair Stewart from the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Melbourne.
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 London Info International 2017 publishes first draft conference programme
The London Info International draft conference programme is now available. The programme will get to the heart of the real issues facing today’s information professionals and providers. A first class speaker line up and keynotes from around the world will be announced in the coming weeks.
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 EDP Sciences reports strong performance in the 2016 Impact Factor results
Not-for-profit publisher EDP Sciences has reported a strong performance in the recently announced 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (JCR) published by Clarivate Analytics, 2017. EDP Sciences has 20 journals indexed of which over half showed an increase in their Impact Factor, and 38% reported an increase of over 10%.
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 Annals of Oncology in Top 10 Oncology Journals
European professional organisation for medical oncology ESMO has announced that the Impact Factor forAnnals of Oncology has risen to 11.855, according to the latest Journal Citation Reports. Annals of Oncologynow sits as 10th in the field, within the top 5% of oncology titles.
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 Bioscientifica announces 2016 impact factors
Bioscientifica, an international provider of services to medical and scientific societies and the pharmaceutical industry, have again announced substantial growth in the impact factors of their biomedical journals in the latest Journal Citation Reports (JCR). Bioscientifica offers additional metrics for assessing journal and article quality and impact. All HighWire journals have article-level metrics which provide traditional usage data as well as Altmetric data.
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 NHS Confederation partners with RCNi to offer members discount on RCNi resources
NHS Confederation has announced a partnership with RCNi, a health information and learning provider for nurses, to offer its members a discount on subscriptions to RCNi Portfolio and RCNi Learning. These RCNi online resources help organisations support nurses through revalidation – the process that all nurses and midwives in the UK need to follow to maintain their registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council – while improving staff retention and reducing recruitment costs.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

House Subcommittee Advances Bill To Expedite Yucca Mountain Licensing.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Martin) reports legislation that would “expedite the licensing and development of Yucca Mountain nuclear waste site in Nevada” was approved by the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on environment Thursday, “clearing the first hurdle for legislation expected to be taken up in the House this year.” The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act was approved on a “voice vote” and “the bill now goes to the full committee for approval.” The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Henry) reports Rep. John Shimkus said, “Nuclear waste management policy is not a partisan issue and there is an urgent need for Congress to address this challenge as taxpayer liability continues to skyrocket due to the federal government’s unfulfilled obligations.”

Platts Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports Democrats on the subcommittee “opposed provisions” in the bill that linked “interim storage of utility spent fuel to the US Department of Energy’s repository program and that eliminate Nevada’s authority over water rights for that disposal facility,” but “vowed to work with Chairman John Shimkus, Republican-Illinois, on compromise language.” Three California Democrats “offered amendments, which had strong support among the panel’s Democrats, that they later withdrew on grounds that they would continue to work with Shimkus on compromise language that could be incorporated into the bill before the full committee considers it.”

KSNV-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Las Vegas (6/15, Fiegener, Clemons) reported on its website that “several Nevada lawmakers issued statements about their disdain for the move to restart talks about Yucca Mountain.” Nevada Rep. Dina Titus, who isn’t on the committee, “went as far as to pass out maps of the 329 districts that nuclear waste would travel through to get to Yucca Mountain in an effort to secure future votes against the nuclear repository.” According to KSNV, Shimkus and Energy Secretary Rick Perry “are the major drivers for Republicans pushing for the restart the federal licensing process for Yucca.” The “Morning Energy” blog of Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Adragna) previewed the bill yesterday morning.

Higher Education

Education Trust Report Describes College Barriers Facing Men Of Color.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports education Trust has released a new report describing “the social and economic disadvantages facing young men of color that make them more likely to drop out of high school and less likely to go on to and graduate from college.” The report attributes these obstacles to “institutionalized racism,” saying “that only 76 percent of Latino teens and 67 percent of black teens graduate from high school.”

California Budget Addresses College Affordability But Lacks “Debt-Free” College.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports that despite having earlier this year touted “a bold ‘debt-free college’ plan that sought to eliminate the need for nearly 400,000 students to take out loans to finance their UC and Cal State degrees,” Democrats in the California state legislature are “poised to approve a budget that includes more modest efforts to chip away at the spiraling costs of attending college.” Democrats in the state Assembly “had proposed new scholarships – which would supplement existing aid programs – that would offset the cost of room and board, textbooks and other living expenses that tend to be bigger drivers of college costs than tuition,” but the budget plan “doesn’t put any money toward such grants.”

From ASEE
PODCAST – Highlights from Columbus, Our Annual Conference Host
Headed to the ASEE Annual in Columbus? Listen to our short podcast where Prism magazine associate editor Jenn Pocock details some of the city’s higlights.

VIDEO – ASEE Annual Conference Highlights
Getting ready for the 2017 ASEE Annual Conference?  Check out ASEE TV 2016 conference highlightvideos here.

EngineeringCAS Webinar
Learn about the new “common app for engineering graduate schools” in an upcoming free webinar.

Research and Development

NASA Holds Technology Day Event On Capitol Hill.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Piro) reports that officials with NASA “came to Capitol Hill on Thursday to highlight work to lawmakers and staffers as the space agency faces the threat of budget cuts and questions about its mission.” NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate public outreach manager Derek Wang said that the program, in its sixth year, “started off small, with private companies presenting technologies they developed using NASA research. The event has gradually grown to include broad areas from aeronautics to human exploration.”

Maryland Plant Produces “Nation’s Most High-Tech Batteries.”

The Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/8, Cohn) reports that “while many Americans may not think about how their television or radio programs make it to their home or car, this is the daily burden of engineers and technicians at Saft America, a battery manufacturing and research facility in Cockeysville.” The Sun writes, “Workers there develop some of the nation’s most high-tech batteries for use in satellites, weather balloons, rocket ships, military Humvees, fighter jets and even Formula One race cars.” The article quotes University of Maryland Energy Research Center Director Eric D. Wachsman saying, “They are an amazing company that people in Maryland don’t know about.”

Johns Hopkins Engineers Lead Research Into Slowing Metastasis.

The Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Wells) reports a team of researchers led by Hasini Jayatilaka, who earned her doctorate in chemical and biomolecular engineering this spring from Johns Hopkins, recently “discovered the biochemical mechanism that tells cancer cells to break off from the primary tumor and spread throughout the body, a process called metastasis,” as well as two FDA-approved treatments that can “significantly” slow metastasis. The study, published May 26 in Nature Communications, found that when tumors reach a certain density, they release proteins Interleukin 6 and Interleukin 8 to signal cancer cells to spread throughout the body. The team used “Tocilizumab, a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, and Reparixin, which is being evaluated for cancer treatment,” to “block the signals from the Interleukin proteins that told the cancer cells to break off and spread, slowing — though not completely stopping — metastasis.”

Energy Department Invests Millions Into Exascale Supercomputing Development.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, King, Subscription Publication) reports that the Energy Department announced awards worth $258 million to six tech companies as part of a plan to develop new supercomputers ahead of China, the nearest technological competitor. The companies will use the funding to further research into “exascale” systems, which perform on quintillion calculations per second by 2021. The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Liao) reports that the funding went to HPE, Cray, AMD, Intel, IBM, and Nvidia.

Global Developments

Researchers Reproduce Retinal Disease On A Chip.

EurekAlert Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) spotlights work by a joint research team from the Graduate Schools of Engineering and Medicine at Jjapan’s Tohoku University that has “recapitulated a pathological condition of retinal diseases on a chip.” The researchers believe the developed organ-on-a-chip “could be used for disease modeling and drug screening as an alternative to animal models.”

Chinese Satellite Beams Photons From Space To Earth.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Chin, Subscription Publication) reports a team of Chinese scientists published an account of an experiment in the journal Science, describing their success in sending specially linked photons from a satellite to establish an instantaneous connection between two stations on Earth more than 1,200 kilometers apart. Experts say this achievement gives the country an advantage in using quantum technology to construct an “unhackable” global communications network. The Journal says the findings represent a significant breakthrough that makes China a pioneer in its efforts to use the enigmatic properties of matter and energy at the subatomic level. The Pentagon, in an annual report last week, called China’s quantum satellite launch in August a “notable advance in cryptography research.” According to the Journal, while the US has focused on quantum computing, Europe and China have focused on quantum encryption, but Chinese researchers are better equipped with government funds. The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Netburn) provides a Q&A-style explanation of entangled photons, the process by which a satellite emitted them, and the implications of the experiment.

Industry News

GM Expands Fleet Of Autonomous Bolts.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/13, Naughton, Welch) reported General Motors CEO Mary Barra announced Tuesday that the company is expanding its autonomous vehicle fleet of Chevrolet Bolts to 180 vehicles, having assembled 130 of the cars with autonomous sensors and software to complement the 50 autonomous Bolts already being tested in three parts of the country: San Francisco, Detroit, and Scottsdale, Arizona. Speaking from the company’s Orion Township, Michigan assembly plant, Barra said, “We intend for GM to be the leader and not only in development, but the leader in deployment.”

GM is “among the first automakers to mass produce self-driving vehicles,” the AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/13) reported, saying that GM plans to eventually “place self-driving Bolts in ride-hailing fleets in major U.S. cities,” though Barra has given no target date for when this might occur.

The Detroit Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/13) reported Barra said “The level of integration in these vehicles is on par with any of our production vehicles, and that is a great advantage,” because “no other company today has the unique and necessary combination of technology, engineering and manufacturing ability to build autonomous vehicles at scale.”

Digital Trends Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/13, Edelstein) reported “this production run gives GM one of the largest fleets of autonomous cars on the road.” In comparison, Ford “expects to have 90 test cars in service by the end of this year,” and Chrysler is working on “delivering 100 Pacifica Hybrid minivans to Waymo to be outfitted with autonomous tech.”

Engineering and Public Policy

DOE Releases Funding For ARPA-E Projects.

E&E Daily Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Subscription Publication) reports that the Energy Department unfroze fiscal 2016 funds for the ARPA-E program, including $25 million “for nine projects to double data center efficiency.” Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) praised the decision, saying, “I hope that this decision represents a turning point in the Administration’s understanding of the critically important role that ARPA-E plays in our nation’s energy innovation ecosystem.”

The Dallas Morning News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Benning) reports that the suspension of funding for ARPA-E projects by the Energy Department for the past few months “jammed up at least two Texas projects, including one at Perry’s alma mater, Texas A&M University.” While ARPA-E has had strong support from Congress, Perry’s role as Energy Secretary offers a new “window into the debate” over the program, which the White House’s proposed budget slated for elimination. Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Tilley) reports that companies receiving funding will “make up at least 40% of the overall project cost, which is expected to reach at least $430 million.”

Electric Vehicles Could Help Cities Reduce Carbon Emissions.

Rice University Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering Daniel Cohan writes for the Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Cohan) that Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner’s departure from President Trump’s decision to exit the Paris climate agreement reaffirms that the federal government “is no longer leading American efforts to shrink our carbon footprint.” However, Houston is “just one of many local and state governments…aiming to help fill this policy void.” Cohan says electric vehicles is one way cities “can bring about clear-cut reductions in carbon emissions.” Cohan adds that 30 cities, including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston, “are seeking bulk-rate deals on electric vehicles” and have “asked manufacturers to submit bids to supply up to 114,000 electric vehicles, ranging from police cruisers to trash haulers, at a total cost of roughly $10 billion.”

Sandoval Reinstates Key Solar Energy Policy In Nevada.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval yesterday “signed a bill to reinstate a key rooftop solar policy” bringing “national residential installers Tesla Inc’s solar division and Sunrun Inc back to the state after an 18-month absence.” State legislators last week passed a bill “which requires utilities to purchase excess power generated from rooftop solar panels at near the full retail rate.” Both Sunrun and Tesla “said they would resume sales in Nevada if Sandoval signed the bill.” Sandoval “did so on Thursday during a ceremony held at a Tesla facility in Las Vegas.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports the state’s “solar industry entered a tailspin in 2015 when state utility regulators began decreasing those credits,” prompting “some generator manufacturing and installation companies to make layoffs and leave the state.” Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Chediak) reports that in a statement Sandoval said, “This bill restores the rooftop solar industry in Nevada by making sure rooftop solar owners are fairly credited for the clean energy they produce.” The Las Vegas Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) also provides coverage of this story.

Tennessee Wind Farm Suspended After State Passes Moratorium.

ClimateWire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Cusick, Subscription Publication) reports that Apex Clean Energy Inc. suspended the construction of its $100 million Crab Orchard Wind farm in Tennessee due to “economic and market conditions.” The suspension comes several months after the Tennessee General Assembly passed a moratorium on all new wind farm permitting in the state. State officials said the moratorium is only in place so that “experts could study how the industry is regulated in other states.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Consultant Offers Tips For Teaching Coding In The Classroom.

Educational Consultant Matthew Lynch writes at Education Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) to offer “teachers some practical suggestions on how to teach coding in a classroom.” His tips include: “do your research”; “your students can handle it”; “you don’t need a 1:1 classroom.”; “don’t be the Lone Ranger”; “learning to code should be fun and engaging”; “don’t just talk it, do it”; “once you take the training wheels off, leave them off”; “remember, kids, learn at different rates”; and “don’t position yourself as an expert.”

Purdue University Offers Cyber Security In Camp.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15) reports “Purdue University Northwest kicked off a program for high school students and teachers Monday on cybersecurity.” The AP says “the program, called GenCyber, is designed to help educators develop curriculum for students to understand correct and safe online behavior, increase diversity and interest in cybersecurity and increase awareness about careers in the cybersecurity workforce.” Instructor Ge Jin, who is a PNW associate professor of computer information technology and graphics, “said many cyber threats affect students and teachers.” He said, “If someone is fishing or sending you an email from something that you don’t recognize, don’t open it. … Today, we play a lot of computer games. It’s important to be careful about cyber attacks. It’s important to have a proper defense mechanism for different cyber attacks. We will be creating five or six different types of attacks as a game and teaching students how to develop defense mechanisms against them.”

Colorado Robotics Team To Compete For World Championship.

The Denver Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Whaley) reports on local robotics Team #6929 Data Force, which will be “competing in the upcoming Festival of Champions scheduled [on] July 28 and 29 in New Hampshire.” The Post says that “there, the teens and the Falcon will meet Team Redneck Robotics, made up of students from Fairfield, Great Falls and Sun River Valley in Montana.” The report explains that “about 15,000 K-12 students from 33 countries face off in the annual FIRST robotics championships” where “students design, build and program robots in a matter of weeks to compete in specific challenges.” The Post says “Data Force won the FIRST Tech Challenge World Championship in St. Louis in April” while “Rednecks Robotics won the FIRST Tech Challenge in Houston in April.” Meanwhile, “FIRST organizers hope to crown an ultimate world champion when the teams meet at the New Hampshire competition.”

Thursday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Clarivate Analytics unveils 2017 Journal Citation Reports
Clarivate Analytics, formerly the Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters, has released the 2017 Journal Citation Reports (JCR), an annual update of the most influential and comprehensive resource for information on highly cited, peer-reviewed publications and the source of Journal Impact Factor (JIF) scores. Since 1973, the JCR has provided an assessment of a journal’s standing in scholarly literature through the objective evaluation of statistical information, which only a publisher-independent company such as Clarivate Analytics, can provide.
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 EBSCO Information Services appoints John McDonald as Director, Product Management
EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) has expanded its Analytics and Assessment team, hiring John McDonald as Director of Product Management. In the new role, McDonald will work with libraries to provide advanced decision-making support and intelligence.
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 Springer Nature sponsors first Singapore Three Minute Thesis competition
Springer Nature is providing sponsorship for the 2017 Singapore Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, where twenty PhD candidates from Singapore will gather on August 4, 2017 at the Nanyang Technological University (NTU). The competition challenges participants to explain their research thesis in a clear and engaging three-minute talk aimed at non-specialists.
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 BMJ announces Josef Smolen as Editor of Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Healthcare knowledge provider BMJ has announced Josef Smolen as the new editor of Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (ARD). ARD is the top ranked journal in the field of rheumatology with an impact factor of 12.811.
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 Emerald Publishing delivers its Impact Factor results
Academic publisher Emerald Publishing has received its Impact Factor results in the data release of the 2016 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) from Clarivate Analytics, with overall citations up by 41 percent. Emerald has seen more journals accepted into the SSCI (Social Science Citation Index) this year, with seven journals having been accepted since January 2017 including the Journal of Health Organization and Management, which has received its first Impact Factor of 1.07.
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 Cochrane announces 2016 Impact Factor for Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Cochrane, a global independent network of researchers, professionals, patients, carers and people interested in health, has announced that the Impact Factor of Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) is now 6.124. According to 2016 Journal Citation Report (JCR), released by Clarivate Analytics (formerly Thomson ISI), this is a slight increase on the 2015 impact factor, which was 6.103.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Interior Department Delaying Compliance Date For Methane Emissions Regulations.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Gardner) reports an Interior Department document indicated the Trump Administration is suspending compliance dates on a regulation that limits methane emissions from oil and gas companies working on public lands. Compliance dates will be suspended until a federal court in Wyoming considers litigation on the rule.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Eilperin) reports in a filing, the Bureau of Land Management entered a notice in the Federal Register saying it would delay compliance with the rule limiting methane flared from drilling operations on federal and tribal lands. Interior officials did not issue a public statement on delaying the rule, but deputy assistant secretary for land and minerals management Katharine MacGregor wrote, “While the BLM believes the Waste Prevention Rule was properly promulgated, the petitioners have raised serious questions concerning the validity of certain provisions of the Rule.”

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Henry) reports the BLM wrote in the register that is was delaying the rule limiting methane waste “in light of the regulatory uncertainty created by the pending litigation and the ongoing administrative review.” The agency wrote, “Given this legal uncertainty, operators should not be required to expend substantial time and resources to comply with regulatory requirements that may prove short-lived as a result of pending litigation or the administrative review that is already under way.” Environmental groups sued the EPA earlier this month when it was considering delaying the rule, saying the agency overstepped its bounds.

Platts Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Scheid) reports Lena Moffitt, senior director for the Sierra Club, said, “Once again, Donald Trump and [Interior Secretary] Ryan Zinke are showing where their priorities lie: the profits of corporate polluters above all else, including the health of our communities. … BLM’s methane rule would protect our public lands and communities, and it has already withstood legal challenges and an attempted repeal in Congress.” The Daily Caller Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Follett) reports the EPA justified its review of rule citing a new study by NOAA researchers, which said the agency used inflated methane emissions estimates to justify the regulation. The study said that the research used daily peak emissions, rather than daily averages.

Additional coverage was provided by the Washington (DC) Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Siciliano), the Grand Junction (CO) Daily Sentinel Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Webb), the Santa Fe New Mexican Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Moss), the Natural Gas Intelligence Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Passut, Subscription Publication), and Greenwire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Subscription Publication)..

Higher Education

DeVos Suspends Obama-Era Rules On For-Profit Colleges.

In what the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Strauss) describes as “a victory for Republican lawmakers and for-profit colleges,” Education Secretary Betsy DeVos moved Wednesday to suspend two Obama-era rules “that were intended to protect students from predatory for-profit colleges, saying it will soon start the process to write its own regulations.” A statement from ED said “that it was going to create new committees to rewrite rules covering borrower defense to repaying (BDR) and gainful employment (GE).” The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Mitchell, Subscription Publication) reports that DeVos argued the suspended rules created an undue burden and would have been expensive for taxpayers. Said DeVos, “It’s time for a regulatory reset. … It is the Department’s aim, and this Administration’s commitment, to protect students from predatory practices while also providing clear, fair and balanced rules for colleges and universities to follow.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Cohen, Subscription Publication) says ED said that while it develops “fair, effective and improved regulations to protect individual borrowers from fraud, ensure accountability across institutions of higher education and protect taxpayers,” it will “continue to process nearly 16,000 claims for debt relief being made under existing rules, and said some borrowers could expect loans to be discharged within the next several weeks.”

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, McCoy) reports that the plan “drew criticism and predictions of legal challenges,” and quotes DeVos’ Obama Administration predecessor, John King, as saying the decision was “deeply worrisome and wrong.” The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Danilova) reports explains that the borrower defense to repayment rules allowed students to “have their loans erased if their college misrepresented the quality of its programs or broke a ‘contractual promise,’” while the “gainful employment rule was designed to ensure that graduates would be able to earn enough money to pay off their student loan debt.” However, DeVos said the rules “were ‘overly burdensome and confusing’ and need to be streamlined,” and “said many colleges have complained that the definition of misrepresentation and breach of contract is too broad and that institutions lacked meaningful due process.” The AP reports ED has scheduled hearings on the rules in July.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Lambert) reports DeVos “pressed pause on a rule intended to speedily cancel the student-loan debts of people defrauded by for-profit Corinthian Colleges Inc and others, so that it can be rewritten.” The piece notes that the issue has been the root of a conflict between DeVos and congressional Democrats who say “thousands of student have been caught in limbo as the Education Department slowly grants discharges.”

Other news outlets covering this story include U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Camera), The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(6/14, Wheeler), Consumer Reports Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Kieler), the Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14), CNN Money Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14), Inside Higher Ed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14), The Street Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14).

AGs Pursuing Legal Action To Fight Rule Rollback. The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) reports Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said “she intends to sue US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and the federal agency over the decision to halt student loan borrower protections,” quoting her saying, “Once again, President Trump’s Department of Education has sided with for-profit school executives and lobbyists who have defrauded taxpayers of billions of dollars in federal loans.”

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) reports, “eight states and the District of Columbia are seeking to block” the rollback on the rules, “as well as a ban on mandatory arbitration clauses.” The AGs “of Massachusetts, California, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington D.C., all Democrats, cite the Trump administration’s possible delay of the regulations as one of the reasons they need to be granted permission to step in and defend the Obama-era rules.”

Report: Federal Agencies Failing To Stop Fraudulent Student Debt Relief Companies.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Read, Nykiel) reports according to a review by NerdWallet, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission “in recent years have closed only seven companies that lured consumers with rosy promises to reduce or forgive student loan debt.” However, over 130 such firms “operating during the period had records of questionable or illegal behavior,” and many have been “hit by lawsuits, court actions or negative Better Business Bureau ratings – or had owners who couldn’t manage their own debts.” Meanwhile, consumer advocates “fault the U.S. Education Department for enabling what they identify as the root cause of the scams – bad practices of loan-servicing companies such as Navient.”

Drew Gilpin Faust To Step Down As Harvard President.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Larimer) reports Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust has announced that she will step down at the end of the next academic year. Faust, a historian and author, is the first female Harvard president, and “worked to make Harvard more accessible to students who previously might not have been able to afford the ultra-selective school.”

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, McDonald) reports Faust’s 11-year tenure was “marked by record fundraising and an effort to bounce back from the financial impact of the credit crisis, especially on its lagging endowment.” Faust “presided over a capital campaign that has raised more than $8 billion for Harvard, the nation’s wealthiest and oldest university, which was founded in 1636.”

From ASEE
PODCAST – Highlights from Columbus, Our Annual Conference Host
Headed to the ASEE Annual in Columbus? Listen to our short podcast where Prism magazine associate editor Jenn Pocock details some of the city’s higlights.

VIDEO – ASEE Annual Conference Highlights
Getting ready for the 2017 ASEE Annual Conference?  Check out ASEE TV 2016 conference highlight videos here.

EngineeringCAS Webinar
Learn about the new “common app for engineering graduate schools” in an upcoming free webinar.

Research and Development

Clemson Professor Gets NSF Grant To Create Operating System To Defend Against Cyber Attacks.

The Greenville (SC) Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) reports Clemson University computer science Professor Hongxin Hu is “working to create an operating system that can better defend against cyberattacks.” Hu said he “recently received a $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation and VMware, a software company, to create an operating system for large computer and network systems” that “could make data stored and transmitted in computer and network systems more secure.”

University Of Texas At Arlington Researchers Working On Twitter Bot Detection Tool.

The Hindustan Times (IND) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/13) reports researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington “are developing a new computer tool that can detect Twitter bots which create and spread false information, an advance that may help counter the growing menace of fake news.” The piece explains that Twitter bots are “accounts run by computer programmes that automatically publish and forward content, follow other accounts, leave comments and conduct seemingly ‘real’ activity.” The piece quotes UTA’s Chengkai Li saying, “Right now, you don’t know what is coming from a real person and what’s coming from a computer, sometimes for malicious, or at least, misleading reasons.”

Researchers Test UAVs For Medical Emergencies.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) posted video by Newsy Newslook which reported that a research team in Sweden “ran a few simulations and found that defibrillator-carrying drones responded quicker than ambulances in heart-attack situations.” Still, Newsy Newslook adds that “more extensive testing is needed before medical drones would go live.”

Workforce

Study: Female-Founded Tech Start-Ups Hire More Women.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Sandler) reports that “technology start-ups with at least one female founder have more women employees than major technology companies and twice as many women employees as start-ups with no female founders, a survey has found.” USA Today adds, “The survey from FundersClub underscores research that shows women in leadership positions are crucial for the advancement of other women.” The article adds that the survey is “also a signal that more women are pursuing entrepreneurial paths and that young companies may be more becoming more open to recruiting diverse workforces in an industry widely criticized for being a boys club and for having a widening gender gap.”

Industry News

Airbnb Executive Discusses Impact Of AI Technology In Home-Sharing.

Venture Beat Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) reports on the new potential uses of artificial intelligence and the “measurable impact that machine learning has had on Airbnb’s unique technological challenge,” with Airbnb VP of Engineering Mike Curtis. Curtis says that part of Airbnb’s challenge is to create a match between hosts and guests that leads to a “great experience out there in the real world,” and to do this Airbnb relies on “personalizing rank search results for guests” through machine learning. Airbnb’s software produces listings based on the listings users click on to view, taking into account things like location and level of luxury. Airbnb also invests in AI technology for hosts in its predictive pricing model, which uses the technology to account for supply and demand in real time. Curtis adds that Airbnb’s technology and innovation is getting “better all the time.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Judge Orders Army Corps To Redo Part Of Dakota Access Pipeline Analysis.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/15, Kolpack) reports from Fargo, ND that US District Judge James Boasberg “has handed a lifeline to efforts to block the Dakota Access pipeline, ruling Wednesday that the US Army Corps of Engineers didn’t adequately consider the possible impacts of an oil spill where the pipeline passes under the Missouri River.” Judge Boasberg “said in his decision that the corps failed to take into account how a spill might affect ‘fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice, or the degree to which the pipeline’s effects are likely to be highly controversial.’” The judge “said the Army must redo its environmental analysis in certain sections and he’ll consider later whether the pipeline must halt operations in the meantime.”

EIA: Wind, Solar Produce 10 Percent Of US Power For First Time In March.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Henry) reports the Energy Information Administration on Wednesday reported that “wind and solar produced 10 percent of the electricity generated in the United States for the first time in March.” The EIA “monthly power report” found “wind produced 8 percent of the electricity produced in the U.S. that month, with solar producing 2 percent.” The two renewable sources “combined to have their best month ever in terms of percentage of overall electricity production,” according to the EIA. Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Ryan) reports last year, “wind and solar accounted for about 7 percent of power generation in the U.S.”

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Hunn) reports “wind power varies widely by state” and “Texas often has its highest wind output in the spring, the EIA said: California, in the summer.” And “regardless of location,” solar power production “is highest in the summer…because of the greater number of daylight hours.” Approximately “half of all utility-scale solar plants in the U.S. use sun-tracking technology to improve output.” Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) reports a “separate report” released yesterday “by Deloitte found that consumer and business preference will continue to drive demand for renewable energy.” Deloitte “found that 61 percent of customers wanted a certain percentage of electricity to come from renewable energy.”

Wind Power Campaign Aims To Win Over Trump.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Cama) reports the group American Wind Action “is launching a major new advertising campaign to convince the Trump administration and lawmakers of the industry’s benefits to the economy.” The group “said it is spending millions of dollars on what it’s calling an education campaign.” The aim of the campaign is “to appeal to what it believes to be the values that President Trump and Republicans in Congress hold dear, like jobs and rural America, above more Democratic values like mitigating climate change.”

Ohio Legislators Pressed To Ease Restrictions On Wind-turbine Locations.

The Columbus (OH) Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Gearino) reports wind energy supporters are urging “Ohio lawmakers to revise a three-year-old rule that put new restrictions on where wind turbines can be placed.” The “proposal is in the form of an amendment to the state budget.” Leaders in the Senate “could decide as soon as this weekend whether to include the provision, which is supported by major employers such as Amazon.” Proposal opponents, “including some key lawmakers, say it would interfere with property rights of people who live near wind farms.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Gubernatorial Candidate Argues Maryland Needs Coding Classes.

Alec Ross, a Democrat running for governor of Maryland, writes at the Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) to propose “that we require that all Maryland schools offer computer science and coding classes by 2022.” He says teachers can be trained to teach computer science “by creating a private-public consortium of technology companies, universities and government agencies, in which private investment drives teacher training programs.” Meanwhile, he says that state should “convene a team of leaders in education, technology and government to establish statewide curriculum standards for computer science course work, to ensure that teachers have high-quality materials and a clear framework for instruction.”

Many STEM Professionals Moving To Teaching Jobs In California.

The Atlantic Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14) reports on a “growing number of science, technology, engineering, and math professionals in California” who are transitioning to new jobs as high school teachers. The piece notes that many such teachers have “only intern credentials when they start their teaching careers.” Teachers in California usually “earn a bachelor’s degree and then enroll in an intern teacher-credential program…before earning a preliminary credential.” However, “alternative routes” allow “people to take a few short, intensive classes before becoming a salaried classroom teacher.”

National Flight Academy Plans Cybersecurity Camp.

The Pensacola (FL) News Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/14, Gabriel) reports that “students will practice writing computer code, encrypting messages and thwarting hacking attempts in a new camp planned by the National Flight Academy in July.” According to Cody Grogan, a 24-year-old University of West Florida student and Army reservist who helped design the camp, “Our goal is to get (kids) interested in cybersecurity, computer programming and encryption.” The News Journal says “the three-day camp will be the first of its kind for the academy, which is housed in a mock aircraft carrier adjacent to the National Naval Aviation Museum on Pensacola Naval Air Station.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier announces eight new psychology titles
Elsevier, the information analytics company specialising in science and health, has announced the seventh edition of Practical Stress Management: A Comprehensive Workbook by John Romas and Manoj Sharma. One of eight new psychology titles, this completely revised book includes new meditation techniques from around the world. The new edition also covers financial stress, and expands the section on sleep. It is accompanied by online MP3 files of guided relaxation techniques and ten new downloadable worksheets.
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 Scholarly Publishing Association convenes Annual Meeting in Austin
The 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) kicked off June 11-13, 2017, in Austin, Texas. Attended by more than 650 scholarly publishing professionals from all over the world, this year’s program continued to encourage collaboration across university and scholarly presses, with more opportunities to connect both in-person and online.
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 Digital preservation experts worldwide to discuss challenges of digital preservation and share their experiences using Rosetta
Users of the Ex Libris Rosetta digital asset management and preservation solution are gathering this week at the University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK, for the eighth annual meeting of the Rosetta Advisory Group. This meeting marks 10 years since the development of the Rosetta digital asset preservation and management solution began.
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 OCLC Research and LIBER to launch collaborative information management study
OCLC Research and LIBER, the Association of European Research Libraries, will launch a collaborative project to explore the adoption and integration of persistent identifiers (PIDs) in European research information management (RIM) infrastructures. The project will complement and extend previous research institution-scale implementations of RIM in European institutions.
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 CARL and CAUL-CBUA announce collaboration to advance data management and digital preservation needs of the Canadian research community
The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) and the Council of Atlantic University Libraries / Conseil des bibliothèques universitaires de l’Atlantique (CAUL-CBUA) have announced the signing of an agreement. Under the deal, both organisations work together to advance regional and national issues relating to the data management and digital preservation needs of the Canadian research community.
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 Stanford University Press expands title availability for scholars with CoreSource®
Stanford University Press continues to expand their reach and impact in the academic space with Ingram Content Group’s distribution network. Stanford University Press is now using CoreSource®, Ingram’s digital asset management and distribution platform, to increase their digital presence in the academic market.
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 Altmetric badges integrated into Researchfish platform
Researchfish, the research impact assessment platform provider, has announced that Altmetric badges, which showcase the online engagement surrounding scholarly publications, have been integrated into the Researchfish platform. The integration further enhances the information collected by research funders, allowing an increasingly comprehensive picture of the broader impacts relating to scholarly work to be collated and analysed.
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