ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Pilotless Planes Could Follow Self-Driving Cars.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports that New Mexico State University Unmanned Aircraft Program Director Doug Davis said that pilotless planes could be the “next big transformation in the aviation industry.” Fast Company Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Locker) reports that “according to new research by investment bank UBS, pilotless planes would save the airline industry $35 billion a year and could lead to substantial fare cuts – that is, if airlines can convince people to actually fly in them.” Fast Company adds that “UBS asked people to reveal their deepest feelings about pilotless planes and 54% of respondents said they were unlikely to take a pilotless flight. Additionally, only 17% said they were likely to choose a plane with no one at the wheel.” Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Nusca) reports that “the sentiment will change over time,” and that “much like the automotive industry, most passengers don’t realize that there are quite a few autonomous systems already in place on today’s aircraft – including those that land the plane.” Fortune also writes that “every major plane manufacturer is testing fully automated jetliners today.”

Higher Education

Purdue University Active Learning Center Merges Facilities For Science Disciplines.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) runs an article on Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center, which is intended to “marry two separate components of higher education to create a new type of learning atmosphere.” The center “fuses classroom and library space, with a goal of promoting group work and, as the building’s name denotes, active learning in which students are engaged with the material, rather than simply listening to a professor preach.” The facility “houses the new Library of Engineering and Science, which merges formerly separate libraries for six disciplines — chemistry, earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences, engineering, life sciences, pharmacy, nursing and health sciences, and physics.”

National Science Foundation Gives University Of Hawai’i $1 Million To Support Women, Minorities In STEM.

Big Island (HI) Now Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports that the National Science Foundation has given the University of Hawai’i a $1,099,959 grant “to support women and minorities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields at seven local community colleges.” The funding will “support a project aimed at identifying and addressing challenges in retaining and progressing diverse women in STEM careers.”

National Science Foundation Gives Tuskegee Grant To Support Materials Science Students.

WLTZ-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Columbus, GA (8/7) reports the National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program has given Tuskegee University a $2 million grant “to prepare undergraduate students for careers in materials science engineering.” The grant “aims to bolster science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs at the HBCUs that already award a large share of bachelor’s degrees to African-American students. NSF’s HBCU-UP seeks to help meet the nation’s accelerating demands for STEM talent and ensure more rapid gains in STEM degree completion among underrepresented minority populations, who ultimately will fill vital roles in the nation’s STEM workforce.”

Colorado Governor Calls For Bipartisan Support For Postsecondary Job Training.

Chalkbeat Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports that Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D), speaking Sunday on CBS’ Face the Nation, said, “Republicans and Democrats should work together to rethink how states are preparing high school graduates for the 21st century economy.” The piece quotes Hickenlooper saying, “Two-thirds of our kids are never going to have a four-year college degree, and we really haven’t been able to prepare them to involve them in the economy where the new generations of jobs require some technical capability. We need to look at apprenticeships. We need to look at all kinds of internships.”

Harvard ART Institute Freezes Admissions In Response To Debt Load Criticism.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Haigney, Subscription Publication) reports many “young actors” who graduate from Harvard University’s American Repertory Theater, or ART, Institute “leave with a median of $78,000 in debt in exchange for a master of liberal arts degree from the Harvard Extension School,” even though the program is “at the world’s wealthiest university.” In comparison, Yale School of Drama master of fine arts graduates typically owe $14,000, and Julliard graduates owe about $27,000. The ART Institute’s “steep repayment burdens have been a straitjacket on students and their career aspirations,” and in January, it halted its admissions for a year in response to criticism from ED. In July, the ART Institute extended the freeze to three years, triggering worry among students and alumni about the subsequent impact on “the institute’s name and the value of their degrees.”

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

Amazon Patents UAV Stations For Rail, Air, And Sea Travel.

Business Insider Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Price) reports that as Amazon invests heavily in UAV technology, “public patent filings can offer us tantalising glimpses of what Amazon’s engineers are thinking about and experimenting as they develop the tech.” For example, the US Patent and Trademark Office published a patent filing last week which could help solve the issue of how to “keep them charged and in the air for as long as possible.” According to BI, the answer could be “An ambitious fleet of mobile maintenance facilities based on trains, in vehicles, and on boats.” The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Liptak) also reports on the patent filing, describing it as being “for a network of mobile workstations based on boats, tractor trailer trucks, trains, or other vehicles, which can be driven to areas of high demand.”

GM Sponsors Tech Incubator 500 Startups.

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Ohnsman) reports “a handful of high-level engineers from General Motors’ R&D division” attended tech incubator 500 Startups’ Demo Days earlier this month “to hear dozens of two-minute pitches from tiny tech startups eager for early-stage funding. The GM crew wasn’t there to invest in or buy any of those companies, at least not directly, but to identify a few promising ones to work with as a mentor.” Gary Smyth, executive director of GM’s Global R&D Laboratories, told Forbes that the relationship with 500 puts “scouting on steroids – and we’re learning a lot about startup culture too.” Smyth said, “These early stage companies are very fragile. You’re watering them, you’re feeding them, but you have to be careful and let them grow.” He added, “What we’ve learned is the big factor is the founders – will they be successful? 500 has a strong capability of not just finding [companies] but looking at the founders of companies very differently.”

Study Finds Graffiti Can Cause Autonomous Cars To Crash.

The Daily Mail Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Pettit) reports researchers from the University of Washington have published “a worrying study that found autonomous vehicles can be easily confused into misreading road signs that would appear normal to human drivers,” as “placing stickers or posters over part or all of a sign could be used to trick smart cars into ignoring stop sign or suddenly braking in the middle of the road.” The Daily Mail adds that the researchers “said changes that trick an AI’s learning algorithms can cause them ‘to misbehave in unexpected and potentially dangerous ways’” and warned “if hackers are able to access the algorithm, they could use an image of the road sign to create a customised version of the sign capable of confusing the car’s camera.” According to the Daily Mail, “The team said they hoped their research would help autonomous car makers to build better defence systems into their vehicles.”

Workforce

Google Asserts Commitment To Diversity After Staff Engineer’s Criticisms.

NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports that “Google executives say their company is committed to inclusion, after an engineer’s criticisms of its diversity efforts sparked conversations outside the company this weekend..” NPR adds that “in a 3,300-word document that has been shared across Google’s internal networks, an engineer at the company wrote that ‘biological causes’ are part of the reason women aren’t represented equally in its tech departments and leadership,” as well as “men’s higher drive for status.” NPR also writes that “the engineer’s criticism of Google’s attempts to improve gender and racial diversity has prompted two Google executives to rebut the lengthy post, which accused the company of creating an ‘ideological echo chamber’ and practicing discrimination.” The article quotes Google Vice President of Diversity Danielle Brown saying, “Diversity and inclusion are a fundamental part of our values and the culture we continue to cultivate. We are unequivocal in our belief that diversity and inclusion are critical to our success as a company.”

Industry News

Analysts: Apple Watch Series 3 LTE Connectivity Likely Still Won’t Mean Widespread Adoption.

Motley Fool Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Niu) contributor Evan Niu asserts that, although the Apple Watch Series 3 can be expected to come with LTE connectivity and won’t be tethered to an iPhone, the upgrade “is unlikely to be the silver bullet that Apple is looking for” as “LTE connectivity still won’t be the killer feature that catalyzes mainstream adoption.” Niu cites two main issues the feature could present – battery life, especially as this was reportedly why the Series 2 didn’t feature LTE connectivity and also because the current model already requires almost daily charging, and the cost associated with connecting yet another device to a data plan. The article adds that it’s still unclear how much data daily use the Watch would require or how it would be charged – whether through wireless carriers (the four major ones in the US already saying they will carry the Series 3), or through Apple as an upfront premium as with iPads.

Apple Watch Rumored To Have “All-New Form Factor.” BGR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Heisler) also reports that the Series 3 will boast LTE connectivity, but it says that in discussing this, John Gruber of Daring Fireball also referenced “the all-new form factor that I’ve heard is coming for this year’s new watches.” Gruber reportedly said the suggestion of a new form factor for the Series 3 came from and “unconfirmed little birdie,” but “tends to have a pretty solid track record when it comes to Apple rumors.” BGR also says that analyst Ming Chi-Kuo, who is also known for accurate Apple predictions, also claimed in a 2016 research report that the Series 3 would have a new form factor. BGR also says it could sport improved battery life as well as micro-LED display technology.

Engineering and Public Policy

Despite Grid Study, DOE Bets On Natural Gas.

Tina Casey writes at CleanTechnica Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Casey) reports that despite the Energy Department’s new grid study that seems “pre-wired to support the coal industry,” the DOE “has announced a $20 million funding opportunity for next-generation technology aimed at accelerating the trend away from coal-fired power plants.” Casey says that memo ordering the new grid study from Energy Secretary Rick Perry was loaded with language and economic analysis favoring coal. However, Casey writes that Perry’s actions have been consistently in line with “Obama era policies that support renewable energy and distributed generation.” Meanwhile, the new $20 million funding opportunity in support of natural gas comes under the Energy Department’s ARPA-E office for supporting next-generation technology and had been dubbed “INTEGRATE for Natural-gas Technologies for Efficiency Gain in Reliable and Affordable Thermochemical Electricity-generation.” Casey explains that “the aim is to increase the conversion efficiency of distributed…electric generation systems fueled by natural gas.”

Mark Bergen writes at Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Bergen) that as the Trump Administration advocates pulling funding from ARPA-E, Google and other tech companies are also struggling to make money on green energy ventures.

Texas Environmentalists Battle Border Wall, LNG Facilities.

The Brownsville (TX) Herald Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Zazueta) reports that “with the wheels already in motion for the construction of a border wall on a local wildlife refuge and in other areas, local environmentalists are positioning themselves for a fierce battle with the federal government.” Meanwhile, “at the other end of the Rio Grande Valley, environmentalists are also engaged in an effort to prevent the construction of liquefied natural gas facilities along the Port of Brownsville.” The Herald says that fight over the LNG facilities, “which began more than two years ago in March 2015, was prompted after Texas LNG Brownsville LLC and Annova LNG LLC, both of Houston, filed the necessary paperwork with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to build facilities that would liquefy domestic natural gas for shipment overseas, largely to smaller Asian markets.” The report says “backers…tout economic benefits to the region” but “environmentalists argue that any economic payoff would fail to outweigh the cost to the environment, tourism and public safety.”

Michigan Utility Asks Supreme Court To Decide Air Permitting Fight.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Reilley, Subscription Publication) reports that DTE Energy Co. filed a petition with the Supreme Court “July 31 seeking to overturn an appeals court’s decision that favored U.S. EPA in the long-running fight” over whether “upgrades at DTE’s Monroe power plant were ‘major modifications’ that should have triggered additional regulations.” E&E says that “as part of the Clean Air Act’s New Source Review program, a utility must make a projection of whether a proposed upgrade to an existing facility will increase emissions.” Meanwhile, “DTE had argued that the upgrade at the Monroe plant was routine maintenance and didn’t require a New Source Review permit” but “EPA disagreed with DTE’s projections and sued the company. A district court initially sided with the utility in a summary judgment ruling.”

Utah Power Company Seeks Rate Increase For Rooftop Solar.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports that Utah “utility regulators are poised to consider raising rates for people who have rooftop solar panels and sell their extra back to the power company, a proposal that solar-panel companies say could deal a blow to their burgeoning industry.” The AP says “Rocky Mountain Power researchers argue that rooftop solar customers are not paying their fair share for their service while being paid the full retail price for the solar power they produce.” Meanwhile, “a Salt Lake City think-tank’s analysis found that rooftop solar customers save the company’s $1.3 million annually without the need for new generation facilities and through lower transmission cost.” The AP reports “the Utah Public Service Commission is planning two hearings on the issue to get public input and consider the proposal.”

Wisconsin Schools Raised $217 Million For Green Projects Using Law That May Be Repealed.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Richards, Oxenden, Crowe) reports that “under a law that Republicans might eliminate in the next budget, Wisconsin school districts raised more than $217 million in new taxes for energy-related projects since 2009 – all of it outside revenue caps and without going to referendum.” Meanwhile, “Republican Gov. Scott Walker and GOP senators have proposed eliminating the law in the next budget.” The Journal Sentinel explains “critics say it violates the spirit of fiscal restraint and accountability and that districts shouldn’t be able to raise so much money without a referendum.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Indiana University Northwest Hosts STEM Camp For High Schoolers.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, McCollum) reports that Indiana University Northwest hosted a camp for some 50 Gary , Indiana high school students “to do hands-on activities and experiments in biology, chemistry, computer information systems and geology.” Students launched rockets with air pressure and filtered strawberries to isolate DNA.

Florida School District Incorporates Coding Toy In Kindergarten Classrooms.

The Tampa Bay (FL) Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports the Pinellas County School District in Florida purchased 100 “Bee-Bots” in its new initiative to encourage children to get “familiar and interested in coding – an expanding and lucrative career.” According to the Bee-Bot website, the learning toy is a “friendly little robot” that teaches “sequencing, estimation and problem-solving,” which are key skills for more complicated computer coding tasks. Some teachers attended coding sessions in preparation for the Bee-Bots’ arrival, but the bees will not be used as a basis to grade students or implemented into the everyday curriculum at this time. The Times notes the Bureau of Labor Statistics projected a 33 percent increase in computer-related occupations, such as systems analysts, by 2024.

Minnesota High School Robotics Team Introduces Younger Students To STEM.

Hometown Life (MI) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports that in late July, more than 80 children in Minnesota participated in two summer Robocamps, which hope “to get campers interested in STEM subjects, or science, engineering, technology and mathematics, and by that measure, the camps were a success, said Rachel Reiz, the camps’ robotmaster and a third-year Robostangs member.” Reiz and his fellow “robotmasters” are part of Northwood High School’s Robostangs team, which is “part of the international FIRST Robotics program.” The Robocamps are a key annual fundraising drive for the Robostangs, and this year, they raised about $8,700.

Monday’s Lead Stories

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 First International Digital Preservation Day to be held on November 30, 2017
The first International Digital Preservation Day will be held on November 30, 2017 and will draw together individuals and institutions from across the world to celebrate the collections preserved, the access maintained and the understanding fostered by preserving digital materials. International Digital Preservation Day aims to provide a window into the daily activities of those involved with or contemplating digital preservation.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 German universities reject latest Elsevier offer for a new country-wide licensing agreement for its research portfolio
A consortium of German universities, research institutes and public libraries has reportedly rejected the latest offer from Dutch publishing giant Elsevier for a new country-wide licensing agreement for its research portfolio. Germany’s chief negotiator says the offer does not meet the requirements of German researchers.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht selects OCLC WorldShare Management Services as its library management system
HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, one of the largest universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands, is now using OCLC WorldShare Management Services as its library management system. WorldShare Management Services (WMS) is the cloud-based library services platform that provides all of the applications needed to manage a library, including acquisitions, circulation, metadata, resource sharing, license management, and a discovery service for users.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 Zynx Health announces strategic partnership with Hexaware to provide evidence-based clinical content
Zynx HealthTM, a market leader in providing evidence- and experience-based clinical improvement solutions, has announced a strategic partnership with Hexaware, the fastest growing automation-led, next-generation provider of IT, BPO, and consulting services. Under the terms of the agreement, Zynx will deliver evidence-based content through an API that conforms to the HL7 FHIR standard, while Hexaware will integrate the content into its CarrotCube population health management platform.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Katya Pechenkina (BioMed Central Blog); Björn Brembs (Seven functionalities the scholarly literature should have); Suzanne Kavanagh (Seven Steps to Help Your Authors Through the APC Maze); Jo Johnson (Jisc Futures: research in the age of open science); Phil Davis (The One-Percent Club For Top-Cited Papers); and Mike Shatzkin (Strategies to cut overheads in a shrinking book business make a lot of sense). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Synthesis Digital Library Update July 2017

Synthesis Digital Library of Engineering and Computer Science
Analytical Methods for Network Congestion Control
Steven H. Low, California Institute of Technology (Caltech)
Synthesis Lectures on Communication Networks
Computerized Analysis of Mammographic Images for Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer
Paola Casti, University of Rome Tor Vergata
Arianna Mencattini, University of Rome Tor Vergata
Marcello Salmeri, University of Rome Tor Vergata
Rangaraj M. Rangayyan, University of Calgary
Synthesis Lectures on Biomedical Engineering
Digital Libraries for Cultural Heritage: Development, Outcomes, and Challenges from European Perspectives
Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić, University of Zadar
Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services
An Introduction to Laplacian Spectral Distances and Kernels: Theory, Computation, and Applications
Giuseppe Patanè, CNR-IMATI
Synthesis Lectures on Visual Computing
Stochastic Partial Differential Equations for Computer Vision with Uncertain Data
Tobias Preusser, Jacobs University and Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen
Robert M. Kirby, University of Utah
Torben Pätz, Jacobs University and Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen
Synthesis Lectures on Visual Computing
Colloquium Digital Library of Life Sciences
Introduction to Quantitative Cell Biology
Wallace F. Marshall, University of California San Francisco
Colloquium Series on Quantitative Cell Biology
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Synthesis Digital Library Update July 2017

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Foxconn To Build R&D Center In Michigan.

Taiwan-based Foxconn Technology Group announced last week plans for a $10 billion LCD display plant in Wisconsin as state legislators debated a proposed $3 billion in tax breaks for the company in exchange for the investment. A more recent announcement has brought news that the company will also build an R&D center in Michigan as other states continue vying for a part of Foxconn’s expanding investments in facilities around the US.

Citing China Daily, the Detroit Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Gray) reports Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou is planning to build a research and development center in Michigan. Gov. Rick Snyder met Saturday with Gou “during his trade mission to China,” and Foxconn officials “have visited Michigan at least three times and have looked at sites in Romulus and South Lyon.” The Daily Caller Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Goodman) reports that the multibillion dollar investment will focus on technology for automated vehicles. Snyder spokesperson Anna Heaton said of the governor’s meeting with Gou, “They had a great visit and very productive dialogue, but we don’t have any official announcements to make at this time.”

The South China Morning Post (HKG) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5, Chen) reported Gou said of the Michigan investment’s automated car-focused investment, “Automotive development in the US is still more advanced than China. Besides self-driving technology, I’m also interested in artificial intelligence and deep learning technology.” Additionally, he said of his company’s US investment, “The amount of investment has not been confirmed.” Gou reportedly also “said he prefers the middle states and western territories” for the company’s investment locations.

However, the Pittsburgh (PA) Post-Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/4, Belko) reported Pennsylvania is also in the running for an investment from Foxconn. Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald said Thursday, “I think they are interested in not just the Wisconsin location but in looking at other areas across the U.S. Pennsylvania is well positioned to be competitive in that process.” The Post-Gazette says that four years ago Foxconn had announced a $30 million plant would be built in Harrisburg, but the project never came to fruition with the company citing the reason as a lack of support from the state that would make the investment “economically viable.” However, in announcing the Wisconsin facility, Foxconn had reportedly said that would only be the first in multiple investments in US locations and in an interview with CNN, “the company maintained that its interest in Pennsylvania remained strong.”

Higher Education

West Texas A&M Launches STEM Scholarship Program.

The Amarillo (TX) Globe News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6) reports that West Texas A&M University is launching Teaming Engineering and Mathematics Students for the Future, a National Science Foundation-funded program that will spend $1 million “to help support economically disadvantaged and first-generation students pursuing degrees in STEM fields.” The program “will distribute 100 scholarships to freshman enrolling as engineering or mathematics students” and “provides academic and social support to help students graduate and enter science, technology, engineering and math careers.”

Student Team To Present Project At AIAA SPACE Forum.

The Fredericksburg (VA) Free Lance-Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5) reported that NASA and National Institute of Aerospace have solicited design concepts from student in the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts—Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) competition for years. This year, a student team from the Kevin T. Crofton Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering at Virginia Tech took won the competition and “will present the project at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics SPACE forum in Orlando.”

Michigan State University Summer Course Immerses Engineering Interns In Community.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5) reported the Michigan State University College of Engineering is offering a 10-week, one-credit co-op class that will immerse about 25 engineering interns in and around Grand Rapids. The Center for Spartan Engineering’s co-op and internship coordinator, Kyle Liechty, “said school leaders decided to begin the program in Grand Rapids, Lansing and Jackson after it saw success in Detroit over the last three years.”

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

Clemson, Other South Carolina Schools To Study Sun’s Corona During Eclipse.

The Charleston (SC) Post and Courier Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6) reports that researchers from Clemson University and other South Carolina colleges will study “one of the biggest puzzles surrounding the sun” during the August 21 eclipse, exploring why the sun’s corona is “so much hotter than its core.” Researchers will use telescopes to take “high-resolution images that will be used in research for years.” The article explains that the research could help to under stand solar flares, which “can create power surges that would wreak havoc on the electric power grid, disable communication systems and satellites, among other damage.”

AIAA Publishing Textbook On Flight Control Technology.

Rotor & Wing Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/4, McKenna) reported that six researchers are creating a textbook, published by AIAA, aimed at advancing “the state of the art of flight control technology for both engineering students and professional engineers.” The textbook is called, Practical Methods for Aircraft and Rotorcraft Flight Control Design: An Optimization-Based Approach and its lead author is Mark Tischler – a US Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) senior aviation technologist. AIAA offered “short courses” and “hands-on software training” at its 2017 Aviation Conference in June and plans to provide similar courses and training at a 2018 event in Atlanta.

Workforce

Google Executives Denounce Memo Attributing Gender Inequality To Biological Differences.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Forgione) reports that executives at Google “rushed to denounce an engineer’s memo that ascribed gender inequality in the technology industry to biological differences.” Google’s vice president of diversity, integrity and governance, Danielle Brown, sent a memo saying the engineer’s essay “advanced incorrect assumptions about gender.” Google’s engineering vice president Aristotle Balogh also wrote a memo criticizing the essay, saying “stereotyping and harmful assumptions” could not be a part of the Google’s culture. A spokesperson for Google told Reuters that Brown and Balogh’s statements were official responses from the company.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Wootson) reports that the engineer’s “screed,” titled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber,” “blasted the company’s efforts to increase the number of minorities and women in its ranks and leadership positions.” Critics of the essay lament that the “sentiments reflect a tech company culture that’s unwelcoming or even hostile to women and minorities” and “reflect the unspoken thoughts of many others in an industry dominated by white men.”

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Weise, Swartz) reports the essay “strongly” suggested the company favors “ideological” diversity over gender diversity. In the memo, which “had gone viral” by early Sunday, the author argued “women don’t make up 50% of the company’s tech and leadership positions because of differences in their preferences and abilities, not sexism.” USA Today says the author’s sentiment underscored the “views of many at tech companies who don’t agree with the diversity mandate adopted by their employers,” and reflected “a simmering resentment that few have discussed openly – and that puts pressure on tech leaders to address.”

Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5) reports that many employees “expressed outrage” over the essay, which surfaced as the company is “under investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor for paying women less than men.”

WPost A1: Transformation Underway As American Factories Turn To Robots.

A more than 4,000-word front-page Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5, A1, Harlan) analysis reports, “In factory after American factory, the surrender of the industrial age to the age of automation continues at a record pace.” The Post says that transformation has been decades in the making as American factories search for ways to cut costs and increase efficiency. One Washington-based factory, however, is showing that “the forces driving automation can evolve — for reasons having to do with the condition of the American workforce.” Robots here have been employed given a shortage of human labor. As robots become more affordable, companies are now able to respond to such labor shortages. According to the Post, companies can “pick between two versions of the American worker — humans and robots.”

Industry News

More Police Departments Report Ford SUV Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

Tap Into New Jersey Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/4, Benno) cites an NBC news story which states that police nationwide are reporting their Ford Explorer SUVs are causing carbon monoxide poisoning. Ford expressed its commitment to safety in a statement and said, “When a police or fire department routinely installs customized emergency lighting, radios and other equipment, they have to drill wiring access holes into the rear of the vehicle. If the holes are not properly sealed, it creates an opening where exhaust could enter the cabin.”

The Springfield (MA) Republican Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Croteau) reports that the problems encountered by local police should now be fixed, since “Ford engineers worked with” the Auburn, Massachusetts Police Department “to seal tail light wiring areas and replace rear spoiler clips.” The department said in a post to its Facebook page, “The Auburn Police Department is happy to report that we believe the carbon monoxide issue we have recently experienced with our Ford police cruisers is believed to have been corrected by Ford engineers and mechanics from the Auburn DPW.”

Additional coverage includes the Russellville (AR) Courier Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Ingram).

Providence Police Officer Treated After Monitor Detects CO. The Associated Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7) reports a Providence police officer was treated for carbon monoxide poisoning after the carbon monoxide detector “warned him of a carbon monoxide buildup in his cruiser.” Providence Police Commander Thomas Verdi “said low levels of carbon monoxide were found in his blood.” The AP reports the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration “has said its investigation suggests the vehicles are experiencing exhaust manifold cracks that are hard to detect and may explain exhaust odors.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Former VW Exec Pleads Guilty To Federal Fraud Charges In Diesel Emissions Case.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/4, Vlasic, Subscription Publication) reports former Volkswagen chief of US regulatory compliance, Oliver Schmidt, pleaded guilty Friday to charges of fraud and Clean Air Act violations, although on Thursday federal prosecutors dropped the wire fraud charge against Schmidt. According to the story, “Schmidt was a key player in Volkswagen’s efforts to deceive regulators in the United States about the company’s compliance with federal emissions rules,” having “acted as a liaison to federal and California regulators during a period when, according to the authorities, Volkswagen was engaged in an orchestrated attempt to conceal the emissions fraud.” The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/4, Spector, Colias, Subscription Publication) says the federal investigation of Volkswagen resulted in charges against eight Volkswagen executives, although most of the individuals are safely in Germany, which is unlikely to extradite them.

Trump Administration Encouraging Coal Mining On Federal Lands.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, A1, Lipton, Meier, Subscription Publication) reports on its front page that the Trump Administration is “encouraging more coal mining on lands owned by the federal government – part of an aggressive push to both invigorate the struggling American coal industry and more broadly exploit commercial opportunities on public lands.” The Times adds that “companies and individuals with economic interests in the lands, mining companies among them,” have not “held such a strong upper hand” since “the so-called Sagebrush Rebellion during the Reagan administration.” The Obama era Interior Department “temporarily banned new coal leases on public lands as it examined the consequences for the environment,” but President Trump “has moved quickly to wipe out those measures with the support of coal companies and other commercial interests.”

Infrastructure Borrowing Down As State, Local Governments Await Federal Plan.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Respaut, Russ) says that while President Trump took office “having promised a bold $1 trillion infrastructure investment plan over 10 years,” the Administration “has produced few details on the future of federal infrastructure funding, one reason why state and municipal governments have issued fewer bonds to improve roads, water systems and other projects so far in 2017.” According to James Grabovac, a managing director at McDonnell Investment Management, “state and local governments may be ‘reluctant to engage in long-term infrastructure financing given that there’s a promise of a trillion-dollar federal investment program somewhere on the horizon.’” Reuters adds that the lack of “infrastructure-related bond issuance has left a ‘bond picker’s market,’ with more buyers than sellers.”

WTimes Analysis: Trump Facing “All-Out War” With Vegas Over Yucca Mountain Plan.

The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Wolfgang) reports that the President is facing “an all-out war with Las Vegas, as powerful casino owners and city economic leaders vow to fight the administration tooth and nail over” the White House’s “plan to revive a nuclear waste dump at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain.” The proposal, included in the 2018 budget plan, for “$120 million to restart licensing procedures for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository,” will “face stiff resistance in Congress, especially from lawmakers representing Nevada,” the “toughest opposition” may come from “some of the same figures with whom Mr. Trump worked while building his businesses in Las Vegas.” The Las Vegas Metro Chamber of Commerce “will be in Washington this fall and plans to raise its concerns over the Yucca Mountain proposal with administration and congressional officials.” Likewise, the casino industry “has made no secret of its plan to do everything in its power to stop the repository…from becoming a reality.”

Pruitt: Obama EPA “Failed” To Protect Environment After Gold King Mine Spill.

During a visit to the site of the Gold King Mine spill in Colorado, EPA Administrator Pruitt said former President Obama’s EPA “‘failed’ at its mission to protect the environment,” Breitbart Share to
FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Starr) reports. Pruitt said, “EPA should be held to the same standard as those we regulate. … The previous administration failed those who counted on them to protect the environment.” Pruitt added, “I think it’s safe to say if this had been any other company, a BP-type of a situation, there would have been an investigation that would ensue by the agency and there would have been accountability. … That didn’t take place here. The federal government should not be able to hide behind sovereign immunity when the facts don’t meet the protections. … In my estimation, the EPA walked away from those folks and left them in a position of incurring damages without taking accountability.”

Professors: Subsidies Bringing Cost Of Wind Power Down.

Eric Williams, an Associate Professor of Sustainability at Rochester Institute of Technology, and Eric Hittinger, an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology, write at the Conversation (UK) Share to
FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6, Williams, Hittinger) that “Rick Perry’s Department of Energy is currently working on a grid reliability report that many expect to argue that wind and solar cause reliability problems because they don’t supply power continually.” They say this could “be used to justify removal of government subsidies or regulations favoring other sources of energy.” They say “wind is on track to become cheaper than fossil fuels as a source of electricity” but “technologies and fuel prices can go in unpredictable directions.” They conclude that “support policies, such as the current Production Tax Credit, are contributing to lowering wind costs. As such, continued subsidies are expected to enable a smoother and cheaper transition to a sustainable energy system.”

Eclipse Will Blot Out Solar Panels.

The Denver Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/4, Jaffe) reports that the August 21 solar eclipse “will cast a 70-mile-wide shadow across the country knocking out photovoltaic (PV) solar arrays from Oregon to South Carolina, briefly turning off as much as 9,000 megawatts (MW) of generation.” According to Brett Wangen, director of engineering at Peak Reliability, “the West alone could see the loss of as much as 7,000 MW spread over time.” Wangen “said the ‘biggest risk’ is in California, where 80 percent of the state is served by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO).” According to Steven Greenlee, a spokesman for the agency, “We’ve been preparing for several months, and the best tool in our toolbox has been pre-planning, talking to all the market participants.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Commentary Outlines Initiatives Launched By Detroit’s Operating Engineers 324.

Operating Engineers 324 business manager Douglas Stockwell, in a Detroit News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6) column, points to Detroit’s “comeback” as the reason why his organization “is working harder than ever to make the city and metro area a better place for residents, and invite them to explore the careers in the building trades.” Recently, Operating Engineers 324 launched “a state-of-the-art training facility in the city, the Stationary Engineer Career Center,” at which classes are offered year-round “to educate and train the stationary engineers of tomorrow in boiler maintenance, HVAC systems and heating and cooling systems.” These skills, argues Stockwell, “lead to good paying careers – many of them right in the city.” Stockwell adds that his group has “been working with programs,” such as the Detroit Public Schools Community District’s Randolph Career and Technical School and Detroit Construction Science Expo, for years “to provide sustainable construction careers for residents of Detroit.”

Rising Numbers Of CTE Students Continuing Studies After High School.

AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5, Boccella) reports on “an under-the-radar movement in vo-tech education that readies students for more than traditional blue-collar jobs.” The movement introduces “programs in engineering, computer technology, and health care” to “teens who once seemed to have carpentry and clogged kitchen sinks in their futures.” The article relates the stories of students in CTE high schools getting “acceptance letters from such higher-ed bastions as Columbia University, Brown University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie-Mellon University, New York University, and the Honors College of Rutgers.” The piece cites ED data showing that “nationwide, the portion of vo-tech graduates who continue their education has risen steadily over the last generation to more than 90 percent.”

STEAM Learning Program In Michigan Receives $3 Million Grant.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6) reports the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation contributed $3 million in funding to YouthQuest, an afterschool and summer learning program that “delivers educational, enrichment and physical fitness opportunities to more than 2,000 students” in the Flint, Michigan area. The free program offers activities that both promote youth leadership and “reinforce science, technology, engineering, the arts and math.”

Tennessee Districts To Receive $15 Million In State Funding For CTE Equipment Purchases.

The Morristown (TN) Citizen Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/6) reports Tennessee state Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Sunday that the state is awarding a combined $15 million in grants to nearly 94 percent of school districts for Career and Technical Education program equipment purchases. McQueen stated, “As we seek to prepare more students for college and careers – especially in high growth industries, such as advanced manufacturing, health care, and information technology – we must resource our schools to best serve students.” Also on Sunday, McQueen announced the development of a new “College, Career and Technical Education (CCTE) Transition Advisory Council to provide immediate insight and direction as the state welcomes new leadership to guide our work in postsecondary and career readiness.” The council will gather together “a broad spectrum of members from industry, career and technical education, and government” who will “provide feedback on current CCTE work, specificity focusing on the challenges, desires, and barriers to successful implementation.”

Rural Students Gather At University Of Wisconsin For Summer Science Camp.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/5, Schneider) reported that last week, rural Wisconsin high school students attended the Summer Science Class hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Institutes for Discovery. The free rural summer camp was introduced 11 years ago, and it has since “brought more than 400 students from more than 70 high schools to the UW-Madison campus for a taste of what studying – and maybe, someday, working –in a university laboratory would be like.” The camp “is supported by several grants, including an endowment established by the family of Kathleen Smith, a former trustee of both the Morgridge Institute and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 208 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 208 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 208 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Internalization and dissemination of human norovirus and Tulane virus in fresh produce is plant dependent Yang, Z., Chambers, H., DiCaprio, E., Gao, G., Li, J. 2018 Food Microbiology ,
69 pp. 25 – 32 .
2 . Discovery of Novel Human Gene Regulatory Modules from Gene Co-expression and Promoter Motif Analysis Ma, S., Snyder, M., DInesh-Kumar, S.P. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 5557
3 . Scaling Relations and Self-Similarity of 3-Dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations Ercan, A., Kavvas, M.L. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 6416
4 . Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE) Davis, M.F., Rankin, S.C., Schurer, J.M., Cole, S., Conti, L., Rabinowitz, P., Gray, G., Kahn, L., Machalaba, C., Mazet, J., Pappaioanou, M., Sargeant, J., Thompson, A., Weese, S., Zinnstag, J. 2017 One Health ,
4 pp. 14 – 21 .
5 . Extreme Quantum Advantage when Simulating Classical Systems with Long-Range Interaction Aghamohammadi, C., Mahoney, J.R., Crutchfield, J.P. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 6735
6 . Metabolomic characteristics of cholesterol-induced non-obese nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice Tu, L.N., Showalter, M.R., Cajka, T., Fan, S., Pillai, V.V., Fiehn, O., Selvaraj, V. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 6120
7 . Potentiation of 17β-estradiol synthesis in the brain and elongation of seizure latency through dietary supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid Ishihara, Y., Itoh, K., Tanaka, M., Tsuji, M., Kawamoto, T., Kawato, S., Vogel, C.F.A., Yamazaki, T. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 6268
8 . Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass Zillikens, M.C., Demissie, S., Hsu, Y.-H., Yerges-Armstrong, L.M., Chou, W.-C., Stolk, L., Livshits, G., Broer, L., Johnson, T., Koller, D.L., Kutalik, Z., Luan, J., Malkin, I., Ried, J.S., Smith, A.V., Thorleifsson, G., Vandenput, L., Hua Zhao, J., Zhang, W., Aghdassi, A., Åkesson, K., Amin, N., Baier, L.J., Barroso, I., Bennett, D.A., Bertram, L., Biffar, R., Bochud, M., Boehnke, M., Borecki, I.B., Buchman, A.S., Byberg, L., Campbell, H., Campos Obanda, N., Cauley, J.A., Cawthon, P.M., Cederberg, H., Chen, Z., Cho, N.H., Jin Choi, H., Claussnitzer, M., Collins, F., Cummings, S.R., De Jager, P.L., Demuth, I., Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M., DIatchenko, L., Eiriksdottir, G., Enneman, A.W., Erdos, M., Eriksson, J.G., Eriksson, J., Estrada, K., Evans, D.S., Feitosa, M.F., Fu, M., Garcia, M., Gieger, C., Girke, T., Glazer, N.L., Grallert, H., Grewal, J., Han, B.-G., Hanson, R.L., Hayward, C., Hofman, A., Hoffman, E.P., Homuth, G., Hsueh, W.-C., Hubal, M.J., Hubbard, A., Huffman, K.M., Husted, L.B., Illig, T., Ingelsson, E., Ittermann, T., Jansson, J.-O., Jordan, J.M., Jula, A., Karlsson, M., Khaw, K.-T., Kilpelaïnen, T.O., Klopp, N., Kloth, J.S.L., Koistinen, H.A., Kraus, W.E., Kritchevsky, S., Kuulasmaa, T., Kuusisto, J., Laakso, M., Lahti, J., Lang, T., Langdahl, B.L., Launer, L.J., Lee, J.-Y., Lerch, M.M., Lewis, J.R., Lind, L., Lindgren, C., Liu, Y., Liu, T., Liu, Y., Ljunggren, Ö., Lorentzon, M., Luben, R.N., Maixner, W., McGuigan, F.E., Medina-Gomez, C., Meitinger, T., Melhus, H., Mellström, D., Melov, S., Michaëlsson, K., Mitchell, B.D., Morris, A.P., Mosekilde, L., Newman, A., Nielson, C.M., O’Connell, J.R., Oostra, B.A., Orwoll, E.S., Palotie, A., Parker, S., Peacock, M., Perola, M., Peters, A., Polasek, O., Prince, R.L., Raïkkönen, K., Ralston, S.H., Ripatti, S., Robbins, J.A., Rotter, J.I., Rudan, I., Salomaa, V., Satterfield, S., Schadt, E.E., Schipf, S., Scott, L., Sehmi, J., Shen, J., Soo Shin, C., Sigurdsson, G., Smith, S., Soranzo, N., Stančáková, A., Steinhagen-Thiessen, E., Streeten, E.A., Styrkarsdottir, U., Swart, K.M.A., Tan, S.-T., Tarnopolsky, M.A., Thompson, P., Thomson, C.A., Thorsteinsdottir, U., Tikkanen, E., Tranah, G.J., Tuomilehto, J., Van Schoor, N.M., Verma, A., Vollenweider, P., Völzke, H., Wactawski-Wende, J., Walker, M., Weedon, M.N., Welch, R., Wichman, H.-E., Widen, E., Williams, F.M.K., Wilson, J.F., Wright, N.C., Xie, W., Yu, L., Zhou, Y., Chambers, J.C., Döring, A., Van Duijn, C.M., Econs, M.J., Gudnason, V., Kooner, J.S., Psaty, B.M., Spector, T.D., Stefansson, K., Rivadeneira, F., Uitterlinden, A.G., Wareham, N.J., Ossowski, V., Waterworth, D., Loos, R.J.F., Karasik, D., Harris, T.B., Ohlsson, C., Kiel, D.P. 2017 Nature Communications ,
8 ( 1 ) , art. no. 80
9 . Parental exposure to microcystin-LR induced thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish offspring, a transgenerational toxicity Cheng, H., Yan, W., Wu, Q., Liu, C., Gong, X., Hung, T.-C., Li, G. 2017 Environmental Pollution ,
230 pp. 981 – 988 .
10 . Experimental evaluation of the use of vision and barbels as references for rheotaxis in green sturgeon Johnston, M.E., Kelly, J.T., Lindvall, M.E., McElreath, R., Klimley, A.P. 2017 Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology ,
496 pp. 9 – 15 .
11 . Halyomorpha halys (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) egg surface chemicals inhibit North American Telenomus and Trissolcus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) parasitism Tognon, R., Aldrich, J.R., Buffington, M.L., Talamas, E.J., Sant’Ana, J., Zalom, F.G. 2017 Biological Control ,
114 pp. 39 – 44 .
12 . Ultraviolet-light-induced electron transfer between chlorine anions and graphene Zhuang, P., Lin, W., Tian, B., Shih, T.-M., Cai, W. 2017 Carbon ,
123 pp. 380 – 384 .
13 . Characterization and compositional analysis of agricultural crops and residues for ethanol production in California Aramrueang, N., Zicari, S.M., Zhang, R. 2017 Biomass and Bioenergy ,
105 pp. 288 – 297 .
14 . Repurposing the paving: The case of surplus residential parking in Davis, CA Thigpen, C.G., Volker, J.M.B. 2017 Cities ,
70 pp. 111 – 121 .
15 . Categories and functionality of smart home technology for energy management Ford, R., Pritoni, M., Sanguinetti, A., Karlin, B. 2017 Building and Environment ,
123 pp. 543 – 554 .
16 . Computational training for the next generation of neuroscientists Goldman, M.S., Fee, M.S. 2017 Current Opinion in Neurobiology ,
46 pp. 25 – 30 .
17 . Evolution of various fabric tensors for granular media toward the critical state Wang, R., Fu, P., Zhang, J.-M., Dafalias, Y.F. 2017 Journal of Engineering Mechanics ,
143 ( 10 ) , art. no. 04017117
18 . Evolutionary differences in Δ<sup>13</sup>C detected between spore and seed bearing plants following exposure to a range of atmospheric O<inf>2</inf>:CO<inf>2</inf> ratios; implications for paleoatmosphere reconstruction Porter, A.S., Yiotis, C., Montañez, I.P., McElwain, J.C. 2017 Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta ,
213 pp. 517 – 533 .
19 . Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into a b quark and a W boson in proton–proton collisions at s=13TeV Sirunyan, A.M., Tumasyan, A., Adam, W., Asilar, E., Bergauer, T., Brandstetter, J., Brondolin, E., Dragicevic, M., Erö, J., Flechl, M., Friedl, M., Frühwirth, R., Ghete, V.M., Hartl, C., Hörmann, N., Hrubec, J., Jeitler, M., König, A., Krätschmer, I., Liko, D., Matsushita, T., Mikulec, I., Rabady, D., Rad, N., Rahbaran, B., Rohringer, H., Schieck, J., Strauss, J., Waltenberger, W., Wulz, C.-E., Dvornikov, O., Makarenko, V., Mossolov, V., Suarez Gonzalez, J., Zykunov, V., Shumeiko, N., Alderweireldt, S., De Wolf, E.A., Janssen, X., Lauwers, J., Van De Klundert, M., Van Haevermaet, H., Van Mechelen, P., Van Remortel, N., Van Spilbeeck, A., Abu Zeid, S., Blekman, F., D’Hondt, J., Daci, N., De Bruyn, I., Deroover, K., Lowette, S., Moortgat, S., Moreels, L., Olbrechts, A., Python, Q., Skovpen, K., Tavernier, S., Van Doninck, W., Van Mulders, P., Van Parijs, I., Brun, H., Clerbaux, B., De Lentdecker, G., Delannoy, H., Fasanella, G., Favart, L., Goldouzian, R., Grebenyuk, A., Karapostoli, G., Lenzi, T., Léonard, A., Luetic, J., Maerschalk, T., Marinov, A., Randle-conde, A., Seva, T., Vander Velde, C., Vanlaer, P., Vannerom, D., Yonamine, R., Zenoni, F., Zhang, F., Cimmino, A., Cornelis, T., Dobur, D., Fagot, A., Gul, M., Khvastunov, I., Poyraz, D., Salva, S., Schöfbeck, R., Tytgat, M., Van Driessche, W., Yazgan, E., Zaganidis, N., Bakhshiansohi, H., Beluffi, C., Bondu, O., Brochet, S., Bruno, G., Caudron, A., De Visscher, S., Delaere, C., Delcourt, M., Francois, B., Giammanco, A., Jafari, A., Komm, M., Krintiras, G., Lemaitre, V., Magitteri, A., Mertens, A., Musich, M., Piotrzkowski, K., Quertenmont, L., Selvaggi, M., Vidal Marono, M., Wertz, S., Beliy, N., Aldá Júnior, W.L., Alves, F.L., Alves, G.A., Brito, L., Hensel, C., Moraes, A., Pol, M.E., Rebello Teles, P., Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E., Carvalho, W., Chinellato, J., Custódio, A., Da Costa, E.M., Da Silveira, G.G., De Jesus Damiao, D., De Oliveira Martins, C., Fonseca De Souza, S., Huertas Guativa, L.M., Malbouisson, H., Matos Figueiredo, D., Mora Herrera, C., Mundim, L., Nogima, H., Prado Da Silva, W.L., Santoro, A., Sznajder, A., Tonelli Manganote, E.J., Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F., Vilela Pereira, A., Ahuja, S., Bernardes, C.A., Dogra, S., Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.R., Gregores, E.M., Mercadante, P.G., Moon, C.S., Novaes, S.F., Padula, S.S., Romero Abad, D., Ruiz Vargas, J.C., Aleksandrov, A., Hadjiiska, R., Iaydjiev, P., Rodozov, M., Stoykova, S., Sultanov, G., Vutova, M., Dimitrov, A., Glushkov, I., Litov, L., Pavlov, B., Petkov, P., Fang, W., Ahmad, M., Bian, J.G., Chen, G.M., Chen, H.S., Chen, M., Chen, Y., Cheng, T., Jiang, C.H., Leggat, D., Liu, Z., Romeo, F., Ruan, M., Shaheen, S.M., Spiezia, A., Tao, J., Wang, C., Wang, Z., Zhang, H., Zhao, J., Ban, Y., Chen, G., Li, Q., Liu, S., Mao, Y., Qian, S.J., Wang, D., Xu, Z., Avila, C., Cabrera, A., Chaparro Sierra, L.F., Florez, C., Gomez, J.P., González Hernández, C.F., Ruiz Alvarez, J.D., Sanabria, J.C., Godinovic, N., Lelas, D., Puljak, I., Ribeiro Cipriano, P.M., Sculac, T., Antunovic, Z., Kovac, M., Brigljevic, V., Ferencek, D., Kadija, K., Mesic, B., Susa, T., Attikis, A., Mavromanolakis, G., Mousa, J., Nicolaou, C., Ptochos, F., Razis, P.A., Rykaczewski, H., Tsiakkouri, D., Finger, M., Finger, M., Carrera Jarrin, E., El-khateeb, E., Elgammal, S., Mohamed, A., Kadastik, M., Perrini, L., Raidal, M., Tiko, A., Veelken, C., Eerola, P., Pekkanen, J., Voutilainen, M., Härkönen, J., Järvinen, T., Karimäki, V., Kinnunen, R., Lampén, T., Lassila-Perini, K., Lehti, S., Lindén, T., Luukka, P., Tuominiemi, J., Tuovinen, E., Wendland, L., Talvitie, J., Tuuva, T., Besancon, M., Couderc, F., Dejardin, M., Denegri, D., Fabbro, B., Faure, J.L., Favaro, C., Ferri, F., Ganjour, S., Ghosh, S., Givernaud, A., Gras, P., Hamel de Monchenault, G., Jarry, P., Kucher, I., Locci, E., Machet, M., Malcles, J., Rander, J., Rosowsky, A., Titov, M., Abdulsalam, A., Antropov, I., Baffioni, S., Beaudette, F., Busson, P., Cadamuro, L., Chapon, E., Charlot, C., Davignon, O., Granier de Cassagnac, R., Jo, M., Lisniak, S., Miné, P., Nguyen, M., Ochando, C., Ortona, G., Paganini, P., Pigard, P., Regnard, S., Salerno, R., Sirois, Y., Strebler, T., Yilmaz, Y., Zabi, A., Zghiche, A., Agram, J.-L., Andrea, J., Aubin, A., Bloch, D., Brom, J.-M., Buttignol, M., Chabert, E.C., Chanon, N., Collard, C., Conte, E., Coubez, X., Fontaine, J.-C., Gelé, D., Goerlach, U., Le Bihan, A.-C., Van Hove, P., Gadrat, S., Beauceron, S., Bernet, C., Boudoul, G., Carrillo Montoya, C.A., Chierici, R., Contardo, D., Courbon, B., Depasse, P., El Mamouni, H., Fay, J., Gascon, S., Gouzevitch, M., Grenier, G., Ille, B., Lagarde, F., Laktineh, I.B., Lethuillier, M., Mirabito, L., Pequegnot, A.L., Perries, S., Popov, A., Sabes, D., Sordini, V., Vander Donckt, M., Verdier, P., Viret, S., Toriashvili, T., Tsamalaidze, Z., Autermann, C., Beranek, S., Feld, L., Kiesel, M.K., Klein, K., Lipinski, M., Preuten, M., Schomakers, C., Schulz, J., Verlage, T., Albert, A., Brodski, M., Dietz-Laursonn, E., Duchardt, D., Endres, M., Erdmann, M., Erdweg, S., Esch, T., Fischer, R., Güth, A., Hamer, M., Hebbeker, T., Heidemann, C., Hoepfner, K., Knutzen, S., Merschmeyer, M., Meyer, A., Millet, P., Mukherjee, S., Olschewski, M., Padeken, K., Pook, T., Radziej, M., Reithler, H., Rieger, M., Scheuch, F., Sonnenschein, L., Teyssier, D., Thüer, S., Cherepanov, V., Flügge, G., Kargoll, B., Kress, T., Künsken, A., Lingemann, J., Müller, T., Nehrkorn, A., Nowack, A., Pistone, C., Pooth, O., Stahl, A., Aldaya Martin, M., Arndt, T., Asawatangtrakuldee, C., Beernaert, K., Behnke, O., Behrens, U., Bin Anuar, A.A., Borras, K., Campbell, A., Connor, P., Contreras-Campana, C., Costanza, F., Diez Pardos, C., Dolinska, G., Eckerlin, G., Eckstein, D., Eichhorn, T., Eren, E., Gallo, E., Garay Garcia, J., Geiser, A., Gizhko, A., Grados Luyando, J.M., Grohsjean, A., Gunnellini, P., Harb, A., Hauk, J., Hempel, M., Jung, H., Kalogeropoulos, A., Karacheban, O., Kasemann, M., Keaveney, J., Kleinwort, C., Korol, I., Krücker, D., Lange, W., Lelek, A., Lenz, T., Leonard, J., Lipka, K., Lobanov, A., Lohmann, W., Mankel, R., Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A., Meyer, A.B., Mittag, G., Mnich, J., Mussgiller, A., Pitzl, D., Placakyte, R., Raspereza, A., Roland, B., Sahin, M.Ö., Saxena, P., Schoerner-Sadenius, T., Spannagel, S., Stefaniuk, N., Van Onsem, G.P., Walsh, R., Wissing, C., Blobel, V., Centis Vignali, M., Draeger, A.R., Dreyer, T., Garutti, E., Gonzalez, D., Haller, J., Hoffmann, M., Junkes, A., Klanner, R., Kogler, R., Kovalchuk, N., Lapsien, T., Marchesini, I., Marconi, D., Meyer, M., Niedziela, M., Nowatschin, D., Pantaleo, F., Peiffer, T., Perieanu, A., Poehlsen, J., Scharf, C., Schleper, P., Schmidt, A., Schumann, S., Schwandt, J., Stadie, H., Steinbrück, G., Stober, F.M., Stöver, M., Tholen, H., Troendle, D., Usai, E., Vanelderen, L., Vanhoefer, A., Vormwald, B., Akbiyik, M., Barth, C., Baur, S., Baus, C., Berger, J., Butz, E., Caspart, R., Chwalek, T., Colombo, F., De Boer, W., Dierlamm, A., Fink, S., Freund, B., Friese, R., Giffels, M., Gilbert, A., Goldenzweig, P., Haitz, D., Hartmann, F., Heindl, S.M., Husemann, U., Katkov, I., Kudella, S., Mildner, H., Mozer, M.U., Müller, T., Plagge, M., Quast, G., Rabbertz, K., Röcker, S., Roscher, F., Schröder, M., Shvetsov, I., Sieber, G., Simonis, H.J., Ulrich, R., Wayand, S., Weber, M., Weiler, T., Williamson, S., Wöhrmann, C., Wolf, R., Anagnostou, G., Daskalakis, G., Geralis, T., Giakoumopoulou, V.A., Kyriakis, A., Loukas, D., Topsis-Giotis, I., Kesisoglou, S., Panagiotou, A., Saoulidou, N., Tziaferi, E., Evangelou, I., Flouris, G., Foudas, C., Kokkas, P., Loukas, N., Manthos, N., Papadopoulos, I., Paradas, E., Filipovic, N., Pasztor, G., Bencze, G., Hajdu, C., Horvath, D., Sikler, F., Veszpremi, V., Vesztergombi, G., Zsigmond, A.J., Beni, N., Czellar, S., Karancsi, J., Makovec, A., Molnar, J., Szillasi, Z., Bartók, M., Raics, P., Trocsanyi, Z.L., Ujvari, B., Komaragiri, J.R., Bahinipati, S., Bhowmik, S., Choudhury, S., Mal, P., Mandal, K., Nayak, A., Sahoo, D.K., Sahoo, N., Swain, S.K., Bansal, S., Beri, S.B., Bhatnagar, V., Chawla, R., Bhawandeep, U., Kalsi, A.K., Kaur, A., Kaur, M., Kumar, R., Kumari, P., Mehta, A., Mittal, M., Singh, J.B., Walia, G., Kumar, A., Bhardwaj, A., Choudhary, B.C., Garg, R.B., Keshri, S., Malhotra, S., Naimuddin, M., Nishu, N., Ranjan, K., Sharma, R., Sharma, V., Bhattacharya, R., Bhattacharya, S., Chatterjee, K., Dey, S., Dutt, S., Dutta, S., Ghosh, S., Majumdar, N., Modak, A., Mondal, K., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nandan, S., Purohit, A., Roy, A., Roy, D., Roy Chowdhury, S., Sarkar, S., Sharan, M., Thakur, S., Behera, P.K., Chudasama, R., Dutta, D., Jha, V., Kumar, V., Mohanty, A.K., Netrakanti, P.K., Pant, L.M., Shukla, P., Topkar, A., Aziz, T., Dugad, S., Kole, G., Mahakud, B., Mitra, S., Mohanty, G.B., Parida, B., Sur, N., Sutar, B., Banerjee, S., Dewanjee, R.K., Ganguly, S., Guchait, M., Jain, S., Kumar, S., Maity, M., Majumder, G., Mazumdar, K., Sarkar, T., Wickramage, N., Chauhan, S., Dube, S., Hegde, V., Kapoor, A., Kothekar, K., Pandey, S., Rane, A., Sharma, S., Chenarani, S., Eskandari Tadavani, E., Etesami, S.M., Khakzad, M., Mohammadi Najafabadi, M., Naseri, M., Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S., Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F., Safarzadeh, B., Zeinali, M., Felcini, M., Grunewald, M., Abbrescia, M., Calabria, C., Caputo, C., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., Cristella, L., De Filippis, N., De Palma, M., Fiore, L., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Miniello, G., My, S., Nuzzo, S., Pompili, A., Pugliese, G., Radogna, R., Ranieri, A., Selvaggi, G., Sharma, A., Silvestris, L., Venditti, R., Verwilligen, P., Abbiendi, G., Battilana, C., Bonacorsi, D., Braibant-Giacomelli, S., Brigliadori, L., Campanini, R., Capiluppi, P., Castro, A., Cavallo, F.R., Chhibra, S.S., Codispoti, G., Cuffiani, M., Dallavalle, G.M., Fabbri, F., Fanfani, A., Fasanella, D., Giacomelli, P., Grandi, C., Guiducci, L., Marcellini, S., Masetti, G., Montanari, A., Navarria, F.L., Perrotta, A., Rossi, A.M., Rovelli, T., Siroli, G.P., Tosi, N., Albergo, S., Costa, S., Di Mattia, A., Giordano, F., Potenza, R., Tricomi, A., Tuve, C., Barbagli, G., Ciulli, V., Civinini, C., D’Alessandro, R., Focardi, E., Lenzi, P., Meschini, M., Paoletti, S., Russo, L., Sguazzoni, G., Strom, D., Viliani, L., Benussi, L., Bianco, S., Fabbri, F., Piccolo, D., Primavera, F., Calvelli, V., Ferro, F., Monge, M.R., Robutti, E., Tosi, S., Brianza, L., Brivio, F., Ciriolo, V., Dinardo, M.E., Fiorendi, S., Gennai, S., Ghezzi, A., Govoni, P., Malberti, M., Malvezzi, S., Manzoni, R.A., Menasce, D., Moroni, L., Paganoni, M., Pedrini, D., Pigazzini, S., Ragazzi, S., Tabarelli de Fatis, T., Buontempo, S., Cavallo, N., De Nardo, G., Di Guida, S., Esposito, M., Fabozzi, F., Fienga, F., Iorio, A.O.M., Lanza, G., Lista, L., Meola, S., Paolucci, P., Sciacca, C., Thyssen, F., Azzi, P., Benato, L., Bisello, D., Boletti, A., Carlin, R., Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A., Checchia, P., Dall’Osso, M., De Castro Manzano, P., Dorigo, T., Dosselli, U., Fantinel, S., Fanzago, F., Gasparini, F., Gasparini, U., Gonella, F., Lacaprara, S., Margoni, M., Meneguzzo, A.T., Pazzini, J., Pozzobon, N., Ronchese, P., Torassa, E., Zanetti, M., Zotto, P., Zumerle, G., Braghieri, A., Fallavollita, F., Magnani, A., Montagna, P., Ratti, S.P., Re, V., Riccardi, C., Salvini, P., Vai, I., Vitulo, P., Alunni Solestizi, L., Bilei, G.M., Ciangottini, D., Fanò, L., Lariccia, P., Leonardi, R., Mantovani, G., Menichelli, M., Saha, A., Santocchia, A., Androsov, K., Azzurri, P., Bagliesi, G., Bernardini, J., Boccali, T., Castaldi, R., Ciocci, M.A., Dell’Orso, R., Donato, S., Fedi, G., Giassi, A., Grippo, M.T., Ligabue, F., Lomtadze, T., Martini, L., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Rizzi, A., Savoy-Navarro, A., Spagnolo, P., Tenchini, R., Tonelli, G., Venturi, A., Verdini, P.G., Barone, L., Cavallari, F., Cipriani, M., Del Re, D., Diemoz, M., Gelli, S., Longo, E., Margaroli, F., Marzocchi, B., Meridiani, P., Organtini, G., Paramatti, R., Preiato, F., Rahatlou, S., Rovelli, C., Santanastasio, F., Amapane, N., Arcidiacono, R., Argiro, S., Arneodo, M., Bartosik, N., Bellan, R., Biino, C., Cartiglia, N., Cenna, F., Costa, M., Covarelli, R., Degano, A., Demaria, N., Finco, L., Kiani, B., Mariotti, C., Maselli, S., Migliore, E., Monaco, V., Monteil, E., Monteno, M., Obertino, M.M., Pacher, L., Pastrone, N., Pelliccioni, M., Pinna Angioni, G.L., Ravera, F., Romero, A., Ruspa, M., Sacchi, R., Shchelina, K., Sola, V., Solano, A., Staiano, A., Traczyk, P., Belforte, S., Casarsa, M., Cossutti, F., Della Ricca, G., Zanetti, A., Kim, D.H., Kim, G.N., Kim, M.S., Lee, S., Lee, S.W., Oh, Y.D., Sekmen, S., Son, D.C., Yang, Y.C., Lee, A., Kim, H., Brochero Cifuentes, J.A., Kim, T.J., Cho, S., Choi, S., Go, Y., Gyun, D., Ha, S., Hong, B., Jo, Y., Kim, Y., Lee, K., Lee, K.S., Lee, S., Lim, J., Park, S.K., Roh, Y., Almond, J., Kim, J., Lee, H., Oh, S.B., Radburn-Smith, B.C., Seo, S.H., Yang, U.K., Yoo, H.D., Yu, G.B., Choi, M., Kim, H., Kim, J.H., Lee, J.S.H., Park, I.C., Ryu, G., Ryu, M.S., Choi, Y., Goh, J., Hwang, C., Lee, J., Yu, I., Dudenas, V., Juodagalvis, A., Vaitkus, J., Ahmed, I., Ibrahim, Z.A., Md Ali, M.A.B., Mohamad Idris, F., Wan Abdullah, W.A.T., Yusli, M.N., Zolkapli, Z., Castilla-Valdez, H., De La Cruz-Burelo, E., Heredia-De La Cruz, I., Hernandez-Almada, A., Lopez-Fernandez, R., Magaña Villalba, R., Mejia Guisao, J., Sanchez-Hernandez, A., Carrillo Moreno, S., Oropeza Barrera, C., Vazquez Valencia, F., Carpinteyro, S., Pedraza, I., Salazar Ibarguen, H.A., Uribe Estrada, C., Morelos Pineda, A., Krofcheck, D., Butler, P.H., Ahmad, A., Ahmad, M., Hassan, Q., Hoorani, H.R., Khan, W.A., Saddique, A., Shah, M.A., Shoaib, M., Waqas, M., Bialkowska, H., Bluj, M., Boimska, B., Frueboes, T., Górski, M., Kazana, M., Nawrocki, K., Romanowska-Rybinska, K., Szleper, M., Zalewski, P., Bunkowski, K., Byszuk, A., Doroba, K., Kalinowski, A., Konecki, M., Krolikowski, J., Misiura, M., Olszewski, M., Walczak, M., Bargassa, P., Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C., Calpas, B., Di Francesco, A., Faccioli, P., Ferreira Parracho, P.G., Gallinaro, M., Hollar, J., Leonardo, N., Lloret Iglesias, L., Nemallapudi, M.V., Rodrigues Antunes, J., Seixas, J., Toldaiev, O., Vadruccio, D., Varela, J., Vischia, P., Afanasiev, S., Bunin, P., Gavrilenko, M., Golutvin, I., Gorbunov, I., Kamenev, A., Karjavin, V., Lanev, A., Malakhov, A., Matveev, V., Palichik, V., Perelygin, V., Savina, M., Shmatov, S., Shulha, S., Skatchkov, N., Smirnov, V., Zarubin, A., Chtchipounov, L., Golovtsov, V., Ivanov, Y., Kim, V., Kuznetsova, E., Murzin, V., Oreshkin, V., Sulimov, V., Vorobyev, A., Andreev, Y., Dermenev, A., Gninenko, S., Golubev, N., Karneyeu, A., Kirsanov, M., Krasnikov, N., Pashenkov, A., Tlisov, D., Toropin, A., Epshteyn, V., Gavrilov, V., Lychkovskaya, N., Popov, V., Pozdnyakov, I., Safronov, G., Spiridonov, A., Toms, M., Vlasov, E., Zhokin, A., Bylinkin, A., Chistov, R., Danilov, M., Polikarpov, S., Andreev, V., Azarkin, M., Dremin, I., Kirakosyan, M., Leonidov, A., Terkulov, A., Baskakov, A., Belyaev, A., Boos, E., Bunichev, V., Dubinin, M., Dudko, L., Ershov, A., Gribushin, A., Klyukhin, V., Lokhtin, I., Miagkov, I., Obraztsov, S., Perfilov, M., Petrushanko, S., Savrin, V., Blinov, V., Skovpen, Y., Shtol, D., Azhgirey, I., Bayshev, I., Bitioukov, S., Elumakhov, D., Kachanov, V., Kalinin, A., Konstantinov, D., Krychkine, V., Petrov, V., Ryutin, R., Sobol, A., Troshin, S., Tyurin, N., Uzunian, A., Volkov, A., Adzic, P., Cirkovic, P., Devetak, D., Dordevic, M., Milosevic, J., Rekovic, V., Alcaraz Maestre, J., Barrio Luna, M., Calvo, E., Cerrada, M., Chamizo Llatas, M., Colino, N., De La Cruz, B., Delgado Peris, A., Escalante Del Valle, A., Fernandez Bedoya, C., Fernández Ramos, J.P., Flix, J., Fouz, M.C., Garcia-Abia, P., Gonzalez Lopez, O., Goy Lopez, S., Hernandez, J.M., Josa, M.I., Navarro De Martino, E., Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A., Puerta Pelayo, J., Quintario Olmeda, A., Redondo, I., Romero, L., Soares, M.S., de Trocóniz, J.F., Missiroli, M., Moran, D., Cuevas, J., Fernandez Menendez, J., Gonzalez Caballero, I., González Fernández, J.R., Palencia Cortezon, E., Sanchez Cruz, S., Suárez Andrés, I., Vizan Garcia, J.M., Cabrillo, I.J., Calderon, A., Curras, E., Fernandez, M., Garcia-Ferrero, J., Gomez, G., Lopez Virto, A., Marco, J., Martinez Rivero, C., Matorras, F., Piedra Gomez, J., Rodrigo, T., Ruiz-Jimeno, A., Scodellaro, L., Trevisani, N., Vila, I., Vilar Cortabitarte, R., Abbaneo, D., Auffray, E., Auzinger, G., Baillon, P., Ball, A.H., Barney, D., Bloch, P., Bocci, A., Botta, C., Camporesi, T., Castello, R., Cepeda, M., Cerminara, G., Chen, Y., d’Enterria, D., Dabrowski, A., Daponte, V., David, A., De Gruttola, M., De Roeck, A., Di Marco, E., Dobson, M., Dorney, B., du Pree, T., Duggan, D., Dünser, M., Dupont, N., Elliott-Peisert, A., Everaerts, P., Fartoukh, S., Franzoni, G., Fulcher, J., Funk, W., Gigi, D., Gill, K., Girone, M., Glege, F., Gulhan, D., Gundacker, S., Guthoff, M., Harris, P., Hegeman, J., Innocente, V., Janot, P., Kieseler, J., Kirschenmann, H., Knünz, V., Kornmayer, A., Kortelainen, M.J., Kousouris, K., Krammer, M., Lange, C., Lecoq, P., Lourenço, C., Lucchini, M.T., Malgeri, L., Mannelli, M., Martelli, A., Meijers, F., Merlin, J.A., Mersi, S., Meschi, E., Milenovic, P., Moortgat, F., Morovic, S., Mulders, M., Neugebauer, H., Orfanelli, S., Orsini, L., Pape, L., Perez, E., Peruzzi, M., Petrilli, A., Petrucciani, G., Pfeiffer, A., Pierini, M., Racz, A., Reis, T., Rolandi, G., Rovere, M., Sakulin, H., Sauvan, J.B., Schäfer, C., Schwick, C., Seidel, M., Sharma, A., Silva, P., Sphicas, P., Steggemann, J., Stoye, M., Takahashi, Y., Tosi, M., Treille, D., Triossi, A., Tsirou, A., Veckalns, V., Veres, G.I., Verweij, M., Wardle, N., Wöhri, H.K., Zagozdzinska, A., Zeuner, W.D., Bertl, W., Deiters, K., Erdmann, W., Horisberger, R., Ingram, Q., Kaestli, H.C., Kotlinski, D., Langenegger, U., Rohe, T., Bachmair, F., Bäni, L., Bianchini, L., Casal, B., Dissertori, G., Dittmar, M., Donegà, M., Grab, C., Heidegger, C., Hits, D., Hoss, J., Kasieczka, G., Lustermann, W., Mangano, B., Marionneau, M., Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P., Masciovecchio, M., Meinhard, M.T., Meister, D., Micheli, F., Musella, P., Nessi-Tedaldi, F., Pandolfi, F., Pata, J., Pauss, F., Perrin, G., Perrozzi, L., Quittnat, M., Rossini, M., Schönenberger, M., Starodumov, A., Tavolaro, V.R., Theofilatos, K., Wallny, R., Aarrestad, T.K., Amsler, C., Caminada, L., Canelli, M.F., De Cosa, A., Galloni, C., Hinzmann, A., Hreus, T., Kilminster, B., Ngadiuba, J., Pinna, D., Rauco, G., Robmann, P., Salerno, D., Seitz, C., Yang, Y., Zucchetta, A., Candelise, V., Doan, T.H., Jain, S., Khurana, R., Konyushikhin, M., Kuo, C.M., Lin, W., Pozdnyakov, A., Yu, S.S., Kumar, A., Chang, P., Chang, Y.H., Chao, Y., Chen, K.F., Chen, P.H., Fiori, F., Hou, W.-S., Hsiung, Y., Liu, Y.F., Lu, R.-S., Miñano Moya, M., Paganis, E., Psallidas, A., Tsai, J.F., Asavapibhop, B., Singh, G., Srimanobhas, N., Suwonjandee, N., Adiguzel, A., Damarseckin, S., Demiroglu, Z.S., Dozen, C., Eskut, E., Girgis, S., Gokbulut, G., Guler, Y., Hos, I., Kangal, E.E., Kara, O., Kayis Topaksu, A., Kiminsu, U., Oglakci, M., Onengut, G., Ozdemir, K., Ozturk, S., Polatoz, A., Tali, B., Turkcapar, S., Zorbakir, I.S., Zorbilmez, C., Bilin, B., Bilmis, S., Isildak, B., Karapinar, G., Yalvac, M., Zeyrek, M., Gülmez, E., Kaya, M., Kaya, O., Yetkin, E.A., Yetkin, T., Cakir, A., Cankocak, K., Sen, S., Grynyov, B., Levchuk, L., Sorokin, P., Aggleton, R., Ball, F., Beck, L., Brooke, J.J., Burns, D., Clement, E., Cussans, D., Flacher, H., Goldstein, J., Grimes, M., Heath, G.P., Heath, H.F., Jacob, J., Kreczko, L., Lucas, C., Newbold, D.M., Paramesvaran, S., Poll, A., Sakuma, T., Seif El Nasr-storey, S., Smith, D., Smith, V.J., Bell, K.W., Belyaev, A., Brew, C., Brown, R.M., Calligaris, L., Cieri, D., Cockerill, D.J.A., Coughlan, J.A., Harder, K., Harper, S., Olaiya, E., Petyt, D., Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H., Thea, A., Tomalin, I.R., Williams, T., Baber, M., Bainbridge, R., Buchmuller, O., Bundock, A., Burton, D., Casasso, S., Citron, M., Colling, D., Corpe, L., Dauncey, P., Davies, G., De Wit, A., Della Negra, M., Di Maria, R., Dunne, P., Elwood, A., Futyan, D., Haddad, Y., Hall, G., Iles, G., James, T., Lane, R., Laner, C., Lucas, R., Lyons, L., Magnan, A.-M., Malik, S., Mastrolorenzo, L., Nash, J., Nikitenko, A., Pela, J., Penning, B., Pesaresi, M., Raymond, D.M., Richards, A., Rose, A., Scott, E., Seez, C., Summers, S., Tapper, A., Uchida, K., Vazquez Acosta, M., Virdee, T., Wright, J., Zenz, S.C., Cole, J.E., Hobson, P.R., Khan, A., Kyberd, P., Reid, I.D., Symonds, P., Teodorescu, L., Turner, M., Borzou, A., Call, K., Dittmann, J., Hatakeyama, K., Liu, H., Pastika, N., Bartek, R., Dominguez, A., Cooper, S.I., Henderson, C., Rumerio, P., West, C., Arcaro, D., Avetisyan, A., Bose, T., Gastler, D., Rankin, D., Richardson, C., Rohlf, J., Sulak, L., Zou, D., Benelli, G., Cutts, D., Garabedian, A., Hakala, J., Heintz, U., Hogan, J.M., Jesus, O., Kwok, K.H.M., Laird, E., Landsberg, G., Mao, Z., Narain, M., Piperov, S., Sagir, S., Spencer, E., Syarif, R., Breedon, R., Burns, D., Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M., Chauhan, S., Chertok, M., Conway, J., Conway, R., Cox, P.T., Erbacher, R., Flores, C., Funk, G., Gardner, M., Ko, W., Lander, R., Mclean, C., Mulhearn, M., Pellett, D., Pilot, J., Shalhout, S., Shi, M., Smith, J., Squires, M., Stolp, D., Tos, K., Tripathi, M., Bachtis, M., Bravo, C., Cousins, R., Dasgupta, A., Florent, A., Hauser, J., Ignatenko, M., Mccoll, N., Saltzberg, D., Schnaible, C., Valuev, V., Weber, M., Bouvier, E., Burt, K., Clare, R., Ellison, J., Gary, J.W., Ghiasi Shirazi, S.M.A., Hanson, G., Heilman, J., Jandir, P., Kennedy, E., Lacroix, F., Long, O.R., Olmedo Negrete, M., Paneva, M.I., Shrinivas, A., Si, W., Wei, H., Wimpenny, S., Yates, B.R., Branson, J.G., Cerati, G.B., Cittolin, S., Derdzinski, M., Gerosa, R., Holzner, A., Klein, D., Krutelyov, V., Letts, J., Macneill, I., Olivito, D., Padhi, S., Pieri, M., Sani, M., Sharma, V., Simon, S., Tadel, M., Vartak, A., Wasserbaech, S., Welke, C., Wood, J., Würthwein, F., Yagil, A., Zevi Della Porta, G., Amin, N., Bhandari, R., Bradmiller-Feld, J., Campagnari, C., Dishaw, A., Dutta, V., Franco Sevilla, M., George, C., Golf, F., Gouskos, L., Gran, J., Heller, R., Incandela, J., Mullin, S.D., Ovcharova, A., Qu, H., Richman, J., Stuart, D., Suarez, I., Yoo, J., Anderson, D., Bendavid, J., Bornheim, A., Bunn, J., Duarte, J., Lawhorn, J.M., Mott, A., Newman, H.B., Pena, C., Spiropulu, M., Vlimant, J.R., Xie, S., Zhu, R.Y., Andrews, M.B., Ferguson, T., Paulini, M., Russ, J., Sun, M., Vogel, H., Vorobiev, I., Weinberg, M., Cumalat, J.P., Ford, W.T., Jensen, F., Johnson, A., Krohn, M., Leontsinis, S., Mulholland, T., Stenson, K., Wagner, S.R., Alexander, J., Chaves, J., Chu, J., Dittmer, S., Mcdermott, K., Mirman, N., Nicolas Kaufman, G., Patterson, J.R., Rinkevicius, A., Ryd, A., Skinnari, L., Soffi, L., Tan, S.M., Tao, Z., Thom, J., Tucker, J., Wittich, P., Zientek, M., Winn, D., Abdullin, S., Albrow, M., Apollinari, G., Apresyan, A., Banerjee, S., Bauerdick, L.A.T., Beretvas, A., Berryhill, J., Bhat, P.C., Bolla, G., Burkett, K., Butler, J.N., Cheung, H.W.K., Chlebana, F., Cihangir, S., Cremonesi, M., Elvira, V.D., Fisk, I., Freeman, J., Gottschalk, E., Gray, L., Green, D., Grünendahl, S., Gutsche, O., Hare, D., Harris, R.M., Hasegawa, S., Hirschauer, J., Hu, Z., Jayatilaka, B., Jindariani, S., Johnson, M., Joshi, U., Klima, B., Kreis, B., Lammel, S., Linacre, J., Lincoln, D., Lipton, R., Liu, M., Liu, T., Lopes De Sá, R., Lykken, J., Maeshima, K., Magini, N., Marraffino, J.M., Maruyama, S., Mason, D., McBride, P., Merkel, P., Mrenna, S., Nahn, S., O’Dell, V., Pedro, K., Prokofyev, O., Rakness, G., Ristori, L., Sexton-Kennedy, E., Soha, A., Spalding, W.J., Spiegel, L., Stoynev, S., Strait, J., Strobbe, N., Taylor, L., Tkaczyk, S., Tran, N.V., Uplegger, L., Vaandering, E.W., Vernieri, C., Verzocchi, M., Vidal, R., Wang, M., Weber, H.A., Whitbeck, A., Wu, Y., Acosta, D., Avery, P., Bortignon, P., Bourilkov, D., Brinkerhoff, A., Carnes, A., Carver, M., Curry, D., Das, S., Field, R.D., Furic, I.K., Konigsberg, J., Korytov, A., Low, J.F., Ma, P., Matchev, K., Mei, H., Mitselmakher, G., Rank, D., Shchutska, L., Sperka, D., Thomas, L., Wang, J., Wang, S., Yelton, J., Linn, S., Markowitz, P., Martinez, G., Rodriguez, J.L., Ackert, A., Adams, T., Askew, A., Bein, S., Hagopian, S., Hagopian, V., Johnson, K.F., Prosper, H., Santra, A., Yohay, R., Baarmand, M.M., Bhopatkar, V., Colafranceschi, S., Hohlmann, M., Noonan, D., Roy, T., Yumiceva, F., Adams, M.R., Apanasevich, L., Berry, D., Betts, R.R., Bucinskaite, I., Cavanaugh, R., Evdokimov, O., Gauthier, L., Gerber, C.E., Hofman, D.J., Jung, K., Sandoval Gonzalez, I.D., Varelas, N., Wang, H., Wu, Z., Zakaria, M., Zhang, J., Bilki, B., Clarida, W., Dilsiz, K., Durgut, S., Gandrajula, R.P., Haytmyradov, M., Khristenko, V., Merlo, J.-P., Mermerkaya, H., Mestvirishvili, A., Moeller, A., Nachtman, J., Ogul, H., Onel, Y., Ozok, F., Penzo, A., Snyder, C., Tiras, E., Wetzel, J., Yi, K., Anderson, I., Blumenfeld, B., Cocoros, A., Eminizer, N., Fehling, D., Feng, L., Gritsan, A.V., Maksimovic, P., Roskes, J., Sarica, U., Swartz, M., Xiao, M., Xin, Y., You, C., Al-bataineh, A., Baringer, P., Bean, A., Boren, S., Bowen, J., Castle, J., Forthomme, L., Kenny III, R.P., Khalil, S., Kropivnitskaya, A., Majumder, D., Mcbrayer, W., Murray, M., Sanders, S., Stringer, R., Tapia Takaki, J.D., Wang, Q., Ivanov, A., Kaadze, K., Maravin, Y., Mohammadi, A., Saini, L.K., Skhirtladze, N., Toda, S., Rebassoo, F., Wright, D., Anelli, C., Baden, A., Baron, O., Belloni, A., Calvert, B., Eno, S.C., Ferraioli, C., Gomez, J.A., Hadley, N.J., Jabeen, S., Jeng, G.Y., Kellogg, R.G., Kolberg, T., Kunkle, J., Mignerey, A.C., Ricci-Tam, F., Shin, Y.H., Skuja, A., Tonjes, M.B., Tonwar, S.C., Abercrombie, D., Allen, B., Apyan, A., Azzolini, V., Barbieri, R., Baty, A., Bi, R., Bierwagen, K., Brandt, S., Busza, W., Cali, I.A., D’Alfonso, M., Demiragli, Z., Di Matteo, L., Gomez Ceballos, G., Goncharov, M., Hsu, D., Iiyama, Y., Innocenti, G.M., Klute, M., Kovalskyi, D., Krajczar, K., Lai, Y.S., Lee, Y.-J., Levin, A., Luckey, P.D., Maier, B., Marini, A.C., Mcginn, C., Mironov, C., Narayanan, S., Niu, X., Paus, C., Roland, C., Roland, G., Salfeld-Nebgen, J., Stephans, G.S.F., Tatar, K., Varma, M., Velicanu, D., Veverka, J., Wang, J., Wang, T.W., Wyslouch, B., Yang, M., Benvenuti, A.C., Chatterjee, R.M., Evans, A., Hansen, P., Kalafut, S., Kao, S.C., Kubota, Y., Lesko, Z., Mans, J., Nourbakhsh, S., Ruckstuhl, N., Rusack, R., Tambe, N., Turkewitz, J., Acosta, J.G., Oliveros, S., Avdeeva, E., Bloom, K., Claes, D.R., Fangmeier, C., Gonzalez Suarez, R., Kamalieddin, R., Kravchenko, I., Malta Rodrigues, A., Meier, F., Monroy, J., Siado, J.E., Snow, G.R., Stieger, B., Alyari, M., Dolen, J., Godshalk, A., Harrington, C., Iashvili, I., Kaisen, J., Nguyen, D., Parker, A., Rappoccio, S., Roozbahani, B., Alverson, G., Barberis, E., Hortiangtham, A., Massironi, A., Morse, D.M., Nash, D., Orimoto, T., Teixeira De Lima, R., Trocino, D., Wang, R.-J., Wood, D., Bhattacharya, S., Charaf, O., Hahn, K.A., Kumar, A., Mucia, N., Odell, N., Pollack, B., Schmitt, M.H., Sung, K., Trovato, M., Velasco, M., Dev, N., Hildreth, M., Hurtado Anampa, K., Jessop, C., Karmgard, D.J., Kellams, N., Lannon, K., Marinelli, N., Meng, F., Mueller, C., Musienko, Y., Planer, M., Reinsvold, A., Ruchti, R., Rupprecht, N., Smith, G., Taroni, S., Wayne, M., Wolf, M., Woodard, A., Alimena, J., Antonelli, L., Bylsma, B., Durkin, L.S., Flowers, S., Francis, B., Hart, A., Hill, C., Hughes, R., Ji, W., Liu, B., Luo, W., Puigh, D., Winer, B.L., Wulsin, H.W., Cooperstein, S., Driga, O., Elmer, P., Hardenbrook, J., Hebda, P., Lange, D., Luo, J., Marlow, D., Medvedeva, T., Mei, K., Ojalvo, I., Olsen, J., Palmer, C., Piroué, P., Stickland, D., Svyatkovskiy, A., Tully, C., Malik, S., Barker, A., Barnes, V.E., Folgueras, S., Gutay, L., Jha, M.K., Jones, M., Jung, A.W., Khatiwada, A., Miller, D.H., Neumeister, N., Schulte, J.F., Shi, X., Sun, J., Wang, F., Xie, W., Parashar, N., Stupak, J., Adair, A., Akgun, B., Chen, Z., Ecklund, K.M., Geurts, F.J.M., Guilbaud, M., Li, W., Michlin, B., Northup, M., Padley, B.P., Roberts, J., Rorie, J., Tu, Z., Zabel, J., Betchart, B., Bodek, A., de Barbaro, P., Demina, R., Duh, Y.T., Ferbel, T., Galanti, M., Garcia-Bellido, A., Han, J., Hindrichs, O., Khukhunaishvili, A., Lo, K.H., Tan, P., Verzetti, M., Agapitos, A., Chou, J.P., Gershtein, Y., Gómez Espinosa, T.A., Halkiadakis, E., Heindl, M., Hughes, E., Kaplan, S., Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R., Kyriacou, S., Lath, A., Nash, K., Osherson, M., Saka, H., Salur, S., Schnetzer, S., Sheffield, D., Somalwar, S., Stone, R., Thomas, S., Thomassen, P., Walker, M., Delannoy, A.G., Foerster, M., Heideman, J., Riley, G., Rose, K., Spanier, S., Thapa, K., Bouhali, O., Celik, A., Dalchenko, M., De Mattia, M., Delgado, A., Dildick, S., Eusebi, R., Gilmore, J., Huang, T., Juska, E., Kamon, T., Mueller, R., Pakhotin, Y., Patel, R., Perloff, A., Perniè, L., Rathjens, D., Safonov, A., Tatarinov, A., Ulmer, K.A., Akchurin, N., Cowden, C., Damgov, J., De Guio, F., Dragoiu, C., Dudero, P.R., Faulkner, J., Gurpinar, E., Kunori, S., Lamichhane, K., Lee, S.W., Libeiro, T., Peltola, T., Undleeb, S., Volobouev, I., Wang, Z., Greene, S., Gurrola, A., Janjam, R., Johns, W., Maguire, C., Melo, A., Ni, H., Sheldon, P., Tuo, S., Velkovska, J., Xu, Q., Arenton, M.W., Barria, P., Cox, B., Goodell, J., Hirosky, R., Ledovskoy, A., Li, H., Neu, C., Sinthuprasith, T., Sun, X., Wang, Y., Wolfe, E., Xia, F., Clarke, C., Harr, R., Karchin, P.E., Sturdy, J., Belknap, D.A., Buchanan, J., Caillol, C., Dasu, S., Dodd, L., Duric, S., Gomber, B., Grothe, M., Herndon, M., Hervé, A., Klabbers, P., Lanaro, A., Levine, A., Long, K., Loveless, R., Perry, T., Pierro, G.A., Polese, G., Ruggles, T., Savin, A., Smith, N., Smith, W.H., Taylor, D., Woods, N. 2017 Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics ,
772 pp. 634 – 656 .
20 . Chronic iron overload induces functional and structural vascular changes in small resistance arteries via NADPH oxidase-dependent O<inf>2</inf>[rad]<sup>−</sup> production Ribeiro Júnior, R.F., Marques, V.B., Nunes, D.O., Stefanon, I., dos Santos, L. 2017 Toxicology Letters ,
279 pp. 43 – 52 .
21 . The relation between text reading fluency and reading comprehension for students with autism spectrum disorders Solari, E.J., Grimm, R., McIntyre, N.S., Lerro, L.S., Zajic, M., Mundy, P.C. 2017 Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders,
41-42 pp. 8 – 19 .
22 . Exposure to Same-Race Teachers and Student Disciplinary Outcomes for Black Students in North Carolina Lindsay, C.A., Hart, C.M.D. 2017 Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis ,
39 ( 3 ) pp. 485 – 510 .
23 . The role of body flexibility in stroke enhancements for finite-length undulatory swimmers in viscoelastic fluids Thomases, B., Guy, R.D. 2017 Journal of Fluid Mechanics ,
825 pp. 109 – 132 .
24 . In vivo 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibition in posaconazole-induced hypertension and hypokalemia Thompson, G.R., Chang, D., Wittenberg, R.R., McHardy, I., Semrad, A. 2017 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy ,
61 ( 8 ) , art. no. e00760
25 . Therapeutic efficacy of fresh, allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells for severe refractory feline chronic gingivostomatitis Arzi, B., Clark, K.C., Sundaram, A., Spriet, M., Verstraete, F.J.M., Walker, N.J., Loscar, M.R., Fazel, N., Murphy, W.J., Vapniarsky, N., Borjesson, D.L. 2017 Stem Cells Translational Medicine ,
6 ( 8 ) pp. 1710 – 1722
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Comments Off on Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 London Info International introduces second annual Conference Programme
London Info International (LII) has announced its second annual Conference Programme. LII 2017 has announced a diverse set of speakers to discuss and debate the most important and pertinent topics affecting the information industry.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 Submissions open for Middle East HIMSS-Elsevier Digital Healthcare Award
HIMSS Middle East in collaboration with Elsevier, the provider of science and health information, has announced the call for submissions for the third HIMSS-Elsevier Digital Healthcare Award in the Middle East. The award, given annually across Asia Pacific, the Middle East and Europe, recognises outstanding achievements and innovations in health IT that advance patient care and safety.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 SAGE and Campaign for Social Science partner to launch pipeline project
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing and the Campaign for Social Science have partnered to launch a new research project looking at pathways into different social science disciplines at university and employment prospects for social science graduates. As a result of the data revolution there is a growing need for more social scientists with number and data skills, along with existing social science analytical expertise.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 BMJ appoints Nick Brown as new Editor-in-Chief of Archives of Disease in Childhood
Healthcare knowledge provider BMJ has appointed Nick Brown as the new editor in chief of Archives of Disease in Childhood (ADC). A fellow of the RCPCH and British Association of Perinatal Medicine, Nick’s UK clinical base is in Salisbury. He is the author of over 60 peer reviewed publications, and for the past 25 years, he has had a parallel career in academic international health and has lived and worked in Sudan, Afghanistan, Papua New Guinea, India and Pakistan.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 California University of Pennsylvania partners with American Meteorological Society to bolster science education
California University of Pennsylvania has partnered with the American Meteorological Society to provide graduate level credits tuition-free to K-12 teachers who take AMS Earth sciences education courses. Chad Kauffman, a professor in Cal U’s Department of Earth Sciences, has been named curriculum development coordinator and lead for the AMS DataStreme program, which engages educators nationwide in studying the planet’s weather, oceans and climate.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

 

Trump Administration To Reject Icahn-Backed Overhaul To Biofuel Program.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Dlouhy, Parker) reports that the Trump administration plans to reject a plan supported by special presidential advisor Carl Icahn to “shift the compliance burden for using ethanol and other biofuels away from refiners” and to fuel blenders and other entities instead. Shares of Icahn’s refining company CVR Energy fell by three percent to $19 when the decision was announced.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Shepardson, Renshaw) reports that the decision is a “blow to independent oil refiners like Valero Energy Corp and CVR Energy,” which claim the requirement “costs them hundreds of millions of dollars every year.”

Electric Utility Lobbyists “Flood” Washington In Pursuit Of Tax Support.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Subscription Publication) reports that lobbyists for the electric sector have “flooded” Washington seeking favorable tax provisions, in particular, the continuing ability for companies to deduct interests on financing for capital projects. “The issue is of extreme importance to our industry because we’re the most capital-intensive industry in the country,” said Tom Kuhn, president of the Edison Electric Institute.

Higher Education

Asian Americans Divided On Administration’s Affirmative Action Move.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Kaleem) reports that when the Trump Administration announced on Wednesday “that it planned to investigate racial discrimination against Asians in college admissions,” the Asian American community was “divided on the issue, with several groups criticizing the administration’s announcement. ‘Affirmative action benefits everyone, including Asian Americans,’ said Nicole Gon Ochi, an attorney for the civil rights group Asian Americans Advancing Justice, which has filed arguments in” a challenge to Harvard University’s admission policies. Ochi added, “It especially helps traditionally disadvantaged Asian American students, like Southeast Asian university students and low-income Asian students.” The group “helped sponsor a 2016 poll that found that 64% of Asian American voters supported ‘affirmative action programs designed to help blacks, women, and other minorities get better access to higher education.’”

Administration Could Face Uphill Battle In Fighting Race-Based Admissions Policies. The Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3) reports that news that DOJ could be preparing to “go after race-conscious admissions policies” has led to some consternation among college officials. However, “the fears it has aroused in them may be exaggerated and somewhat misplaced,” the piece says. The article points out that DOJ has refuted the notion that it is “preparing to investigate, and possibly sue, multiple colleges over race-conscious admissions practices.” Moreover, “any broader Trump administration campaign against race-conscious admissions policies will have trouble making much headway” because “such policies simply have too much past U.S. Supreme Court backing for their legality to be easily challenged.”

Cal State Eliminates Math Placement Tests, Remedial Classes.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Xia) reports that Cal State has announced that it is eliminating math placement exams and remedial classes, “a radical move away from the way public universities traditionally support students who come to college less prepared than their peers.” Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White “directed the nation’s largest public university system to revamp its approach to remedial education and assess new freshmen for college readiness and course placement by using high school grades, ACT and SAT scores, previous classroom performance and other measures that administrators say provide a more accurate and comprehensive understanding of students’ knowledge.”

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

New Mexico State Leads Nation In Engineering Funding For Minority-Serving Institutions.

KRWG-FM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Las Cruces, NM (8/3) reports that according to data from the National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, “New Mexico State University ranks first in the country for federal obligations for science and engineering activities for minority-serving institutions.” The piece reports the school received “$48.8 million in federal science and engineering obligations during the 2015 fiscal year.”

NASA Reschedules Orbital ATK Cargo Launch To ISS.

Spaceflight Now Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Clark) reports that Director for the International Space Station program at NASA Headquarters Sam Scimemi briefed members of NASA Advisory Council’s human exploration and operations committee in late July, said the Antaras launch date was rescheduled to October 11. Orbital ATK engineers are preparing for the cargo launch aboard an Antaras rocket. Under the NASA contract, the Cygnus supply ship has more than 10 additional “hardware delivery missions to the space station.” SpaceX and Sierra Nevada also contract “unpiloted commercial cargo transporters” for NASA.

UVA Professor To Build Prototype Of Mega-Wind Turbine.

NBC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Harris) reports on the future of “super-collossal wind turbines,” which would stand “more than five times higher than the Statue of Liberty.” University of Virginia engineering professor Eric Loth explained, “The larger a turbine, the more powerful and efficient it becomes, and that reduces the cost of energy.” Loth plans to make a small prototype of his proposed mega-turbine using a $3.7 million award from the Energy Department. If successful, “he hopes to raise money for a larger demonstration model and eventually to commercialize his 50MW mega-turbine, which he estimates could cut the cost of wind power in half.”

Seeking Alpha Considers What’s Next In 3D Printing.

Seeking Alpha Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Daniel) offers a lengthy report discussing the future of 3D printing and additive manufacturing (AM), which it casts as a “rapidly growing” tech development that is just now taking off. After chronicling the relatively recent history of 3D printed-products, SA suggests medicine could be the next major frontier for AM manufacturing. The article references a study from Global Market Insights indicating the medical industry will “see an over 20% CAGR from 2017 to 2014” amid “higher demand for patient-specific dental, orthopedic, and maxillofacial products in particular.” Elsewhere, in outlining some of the more obvious settings for 3D printing, including industrial machines, automotive vehicles, and customized production tools, SA highlights the “strong performance” posted by machine-focused “Materialise.” The company uses a range of “high-quality AM services” to support industrial equipment, and “assist with manufacturing, including rapid prototyping, co-creation, engineering and design services.”

Researchers Develop Tiny Diaphragm Pump With Applications For Medical Device Innovation.

Mass Device Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Kirsh) reports that researchers have developed a “tiny yet powerful diaphragm pump that can deliver ambient air to gas sensors,” which are “attached to a smartphone that warns a user of heavy exposure to particulate matter.” Martin Richter, department head of microdosing systems at the Fraunhofer Research Institution for Microsystems and Solid State Technologies “claims the pump could be used as a medical patch to continuously deliver small amounts of hormones and pain killers or even as an implant to regulate eye pressure in glaucoma treatment.”

New York Holding Smart Gun Competition.

The New York Daily News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/1, Carrega) reports “groups of innovative young adults” in New York City are taking part in a Smart Gun Design Competition that was announced last year by Brooklyn’s Borough president Eric Adams. There are currently “five finalists from local colleges and universities are in the running for the million-dollar grant to further their research.” Their designs “will be evaluated and assessed by the NYPD.” The Daily News describes several of the designs, some of which use biometric technology or wearable accessories to prevent someone other than the owner from firing the weapon.

Workforce

Women In Tech Fields Face Sexism In Workplace, College.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Bawab) reports that stories about women in the tech sector who experience sexism and sexual harassment in the workplace are “leaving many college-aged women studying computer science worried for what’s to come and thinking twice about pursuing careers in the industry.” The article describes a number of recent “sexual harassment scandals in the industry” and reports that “women studying computer science say the culture of Silicon Valley has already started affecting them in college.”

Global Developments

Toyota “Anything But Subtle” In Recruiting Tech Talent.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Ma, Nobuhiro) reports that “when it comes to recruiting tech talent, Toyota Motor Corp. is anything but subtle.” The article states that “the Japanese automaker recently launched a marketing campaign targeting information technology specialists and software engineers along Tokyo’s suburban Nambu railway line, where the research centers of Japan’s signature tech giants are clustered.” Bloomberg News adds that “Toyota’s talent raid is unusual in a country where lifetime employment is still the norm at many big companies.”

IBM Opens “Machine Learning Hub” In India This Week.

The Economic Times (IND) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3) reports IBM opened its first ever “Machine Learning Hub” in Bengaluru, India on Thursday. The Times reports that the hub will serve as a physical space where “data professionals, business analysts and engineers could work with IBM’s data science experts to understand and learn the technology to visualise, analyse and interpret data.”

Industry News

Ford Sends Engineers To Help Police Departments Around US Inspect Cruiser Vehicles.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Casey) reports with continuing coverage of the police departments across the country that have pulled Ford Explorer patrol SUVs from their fleets over concerns the vehicles may leak carbon monoxide inside the vehicle. Other police departments are testing their fleet vehicles or installing carbon monoxide detectors. Ford, meanwhile, is working with authorities around the country, company spokesperson Elizabeth Weingandt having “said Thursday it has sent engineers” to different parts of the country “to inspect the vehicles and will go ‘to any department that asks for assistance.’”

Engineering and Public Policy

Economics Of New Nuclear Power May Prevent It From Helping To Reduce Emissions.

E&E Daily Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Storrow, Subscription Publication) reports that nuclear power currently provides “60 percent of America’s carbon-free electricity.” But the failure of the Summer plant project dealt a “serious blow” to efforts to increase that number. The decision “sparked an immediate debate among greens seeking to curb carbon dioxide emissions. Nuclear advocates said it illustrates the need for further government support, arguing that America risks losing not only the workforce and supply chain needed to service a civilian nuclear industry, but also a valuable tool for decarbonizing the power sector.” John Parsons, executive director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, said, “To say a nuclear plant is going to cost twice what you said it’s going to cost, that’s not sensible engineering or business.” Parsons added, “I hope it will become part of the solution, but in order to do that, it has to be done sensibly and economically.”

NY Regulators Cracking Down On Energy Service Companies.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Subscription Publication) reports that New York utility regulators are “cracking down” on energy service companies, or ESCOs, which sell power and gas services directly to customers. New York Gov. Cuomo “has expressed concern that ESCOs may just be overcharging customers,” and has urged regulators to ramp up an investigation that “may curtail where ESCOs can work and what they’re allowed to do.”

Power Restored To Two North Carolina Islands.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Durando, Bohatch) reports “power was restored” yesterday “to two North Carolina islands hit by a weeklong outage that drove away thousands of tourists and caused economic strains for businesses.” On Facebook, Cape Hatteras Electric Cooperative announced “that electricity was flowing again to ‘all of Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands.’” Officials in Dare County “say visitors can return to Hatteras Island starting at noon Friday.”

OGE Energy Corp Report Higher Profits In Q2.

The Oklahoman Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Monies) reports OGE Energy Corp. is reporting “higher profits in the second quarter” thanks to “lower expenses and a recent rate case resolution in Oklahoma.” OGE “had net income of $104.8 million, or 52 cents per common share, in the second quarter. That compared to net income of $71.5 million, or 35 cents per common share, the second quarter of 2016.” The article adds “operating revenue for the quarter was $586.4 million, up 6 percent from $551.4 million in the year-earlier quarter.”

Puerto Rico Offshore Gas Project Canceled Over Utility’s Financial Problems.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Scurria, Subscription Publication) reports that Puerto Rico’s $9 billion utility bankruptcy is hampering the development of a $380 million offshore gas project. Excelerate Energy LP had planned to build a floating natural gas terminal off Puerto Rico that would accept cheap natural gas imports and help wean the island’s electric utility Prepa off other fossil sources. However, Excelerate recently announced it had canceled the contracts with Prepa due to the utility’s financial struggles.

Texas Republican Pushes Back Against DOE Energy Standards For Light Bulbs.

The Dallas Morning News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Benning) reports that Texas Rep. Michael Burgess is actively working to maintain protections for the traditional incandescent light bulb, which has been targeted for a phase-out by the Energy Department’s push to transition to more energy-efficient standards. Rep. Burgess “and other Republicans…have long to the standards as a gross example of how federal overreach distorts the free market.” Meanwhile, proponents of the energy standards say that while LED lights might cost $1 more than traditional light bulbs, they will last a decade longer.

Elementary/Secondary Education

Girl Scouts CEO Focused On STEM Education.

CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3) profiles Girl Scouts of the USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo, who has had “a career at NASA, IBM, Apple and Dell.” The piece reports that Acevedo’s mission is “to ensure STEM learning is a part of every young woman’s life.” Acevedo describes how she became interested in science at age seven, when a “troop leader saw me looking at the stars” and encouraged her to “get my science badge.” The piece describes her career in engineering and says that she is now “using her work experience to address the lack of exposure girls have to science, technology, engineering and math. In fact, the organization launched 23 new STEM and outdoor-focused badges last month to encourage more girls to build their skills in these fields.”

Google Partners With Mystery Science To Provide Elementary Students With Eclipse Glasses.

TechCrunch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3) reports that as the August 21st solar eclipse approaches, “a large number of science teachers are…getting ready to turn this into a teachable moment, but to do so, they do need to be able to give their students eclipse glasses – because the last thing you’d want is a bunch of kids staring right into the sun without protection.” In addition to its efforts to provide 2 million sets of such glasses to some 5,000 libraries across the country, “Google has also teamed up with Mystery Science, a Y Combinator-incubated startup that provides lesson plans to teachers, to directly ship up to 15,000 free glasses to elementary schools.”

Elementary Teachers Take Part In STEM Training At Valdosta State University.

The Valdosta (GA) Daily Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3) reports that Valdosta State University science professor Leslie Jones “wants to make teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics easier for elementary school teachers” and led a series of summer workshops for K-5 science teachers.

Also in the News

NYTimes Magazine Explores Voyager Program’s Engineering Challenges.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/3, Tingley, Subscription Publication) magazine runs an article on the engineering teams from NASA that worked on the Voyager I and Voyager II probes, both in the assembly and launch processes and in shepherding them to their destinations of Jupiter and Saturn. The lengthy article narrates the probes’ voyages of discovery and touches on the current administration’s focus on commercializing space rather than just observing it.

Thursday’s Lead Stories

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier acquires bepress
Elsevier has acquired bepress, a Berkeley, California-based business that helps academic libraries showcase and share their institutions’ research for maximum impact. Founded by three University of California, Berkeley professors in 1999, bepress allows institutions to collect, organise, preserve and disseminate their intellectual output, including preprints, working papers, journals or specific articles, dissertations, theses, conference proceedings and a wide variety of other data.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 JSTOR expands in the Sciences with Scientific American
JSTOR has announced an agreement with Springer Nature to include Scientific American in JSTOR. JSTOR will offer the complete run of Scientific American from 1845 to 2012, with new content added each year. Scientific American will be included in the JSTOR Life Sciences collection, where it joins more than 150 other esteemed publications.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 Journal of High Energy Physics celebrates 20 years of open access electronic publishing
The Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP) celebrated its 20th anniversary in July 2017. The open access journal belongs to the international School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, and is published bySpringer in collaboration with SISSA Medialab srl. JHEP covers world-leading research in high-energy physics, as well as related topics including general relativity, gravitation, and mathematical aspects of quantum field theories.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley adopts Ex Libris Alma and Primo to unify library systems
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) has selected the Ex Libris Alma® library management service and Primo® discovery and delivery solution. In making the move to Alma and Primo, the university’s goal is to streamline the differing workflows from each campus and adopt a standardized, more efficient approach.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 APA collaborates with Center for Open Science to offer preprint services, data repository and open science badges to authors
The American Psychological Association, the non-profit publisher of 90 psychology journals, has entered a partnership with the Center for Open Science to offer open science badges to authors, create an APA data repository to ease sharing and designate a preferred preprint server for APA journal articles. APA’s journals program also supports open science badges, offered to authors who choose to share their data or materials or pre-register studies in an effort to promote transparency in scientific research.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 The Czech Republic National Strategy of Open Access to Scientific Information and Data gets government approval
The Czech Republic National Strategy of Open Access to Scientific Information for 2017-2020 was approved by the Government on June 14, 2017. The strategy includes open access to publications and data (Data Management Plans) requirements for publicly funded research projects. Interoperable and OpenAIREcompatible open access e-Infrastructure will be built, and awareness raising and educational activities will be conducted.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Scientists Repair Disease-Causing Genetic Mutation In Dozens Of Embryos Using CRISPR.

The CBS Evening News (8/2, story 11, 1:20, Mason) reported, “Researchers say they’ve made a major breakthrough in gene editing. For the first time, they successfully repaired a genetic mutation in human embryos.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, A1, Belluck, Subscription Publication) reports that for the first time, scientists “successfully edited genes in human embryos to repair a” disease-causing mutation, according to a study Share to FacebookShare to Twitter published in Nature. The study “marks a major milestone and…raises the prospect that gene editing may one day protect babies from a variety of hereditary conditions,” but also raises ethical concerns about human genetic engineering.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, A1, Cha) reports in “To Your Health” that researchers injected sperm carrying a mutation that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy into eggs without the mutation, and then used CRISPR to remove the mutation from the resulting embryos. The researchers found that the mutation was absent from around 72% of the embryos, and the process did not cause any other changes to the cells’ DNA.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Painter) reports that the research raises the prospect that the single mutations that cause many genetic diseases could be repaired in embryos thereby preventing them from being passed on to future generations. The article points out, however, that the US and many other countries currently prohibit genetic research that could alter germ lines, because of safety and ethical concerns. On its website, the NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Stein) “Shots” blog reports that the Food and Drug Administration is prohibited “from considering any experiments that involve genetically modified human embryos,” and “the National Institutes of Health will not fund any research involving human embryos.”

CNN Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Howard) reports on its website that some critics of CRISPR research “have argued that gene editing may give way to eugenics and to allowing embryos to be edited with certain features in order to develop so-called designer babies.” STAT Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Begley) reports, however, that the researchers found the embryos used the egg’s copy of the gene without the mutation to repair themselves, rather than the genetic material that the investigators provided through CRISPR. The study’s lead researcher Shoukhrat Mitalipov said that finding should help alleviate fears that the process could be used to create “designer babies.”

Higher Education

DOJ Downplays Report University Affirmative Action Policies Are Under Scrutiny.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Savage, Subscription Publication) reports that the Justice Department “sought to play down its recruitment of Civil Rights Division lawyers for what it had billed in an internal announcement as work on ‘investigations and possible litigation related to intentional race-based discrimination in college and university admissions,’” saying it was searching for lawyers “to investigate a single complaint involving Asian-American students in a college admissions affirmative-action case.” An earlier Times story reported on the announcement, “framing it as apparently being about hunting for practices deemed to discriminate against white people.” DOJ spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores called “media reports about the investigation…’inaccurate,’” and “said the personnel announcement sought volunteers ‘to investigate one admissions complaint’ filed on behalf of Asian-Americans who alleged racial discrimination in ‘a university’s admission policy and practices.’”

The New York Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Schultz) describes DOJ and the White House as pushing back on the New York Times story Share to FacebookShare to Twitter. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders “downplayed” it as “uncorroborated,” telling reporters, “The New York Times article is based entirely on uncorroborated inferences from a leaked internal personnel posting in violation of Department of Justice policy. … While the White House does not confirm or deny the existence of potential investigations, the Department of Justice will always review credible allegations of discrimination on the basis of any race.”

Nonetheless, the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Horwitz, Costa) says the internal DOJ announcement “has roused President Trump’s conservative base by seizing on a longtime grievance of the right at a moment when the administration is struggling to fulfill core Republican promises.” The Post casts the move as a “signal that the administration is embracing the base during a time of turbulence and tension,” and adds that some GOP operatives “see the affirmative action initiative as a strategic play by the White House to rally middle-class and upper-middle-class white voters, especially as the Republican agenda on Capitol Hill has stalled.”

Connecticut, Rhode Island Universities Launch Program To Interest Students In Naval, Underwater Engineering Careers.

The New London (CT) Day Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) reports that the University of Connecticut and the University of Rhode Island have launched a new program that “will target students interested in careers in the Navy and undersea engineering.” Funded through a $1.3 million Office of Naval Research grant, the program will offer “a new concentration in naval and science technology…to as many as 50 engineering students on both campuses.” Students will “conduct research and design projects involving new Navy technologies.”

Senate Sends GI Bill College Aid Expansion To Trump’s Desk.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Yen) reports that the Senate has approved legislation “to provide the biggest expansion of college aid for military veterans in a decade,” sending the bill to President Trump’s desk. The bill “removes a 15-year time limit to tap into GI benefits and increases money for thousands in the National Guard and Reserve.” Senate Veterans Affairs Chairman Johnny Isakson said, “This bill invests in the proven success of our veterans. When our veterans return home, they should have every opportunity available to them to pursue their desired profession and career.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Fandos, Subscription Publication) says the bill was passed “with rare unanimity” by voice vote. Isakson tweeted Share to FacebookShare to Twitter, “I thank Congress for quickly approving the bipartisan, bicameral #ForeverGIBill; a great victory for our veterans.”

Cybersecurity Scholarship Bill Advances In Senate.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Chalfant) reports that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee has approved a bipartisan bill “that would update and expand an existing federal cybersecurity scholarship program for students pursuing degrees in cyber fields.” The measure “would expand a cyber scholarship-for-service program run by the National Science Foundation in an effort to bolster the nation’s cybersecurity workforce.”

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

Virginia Tech Researchers Create Neutrino Detection Technology To Track Illicit Nuclear Activity.

WDBJ-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Roanoke, VA (8/2) reports online that researchers at Virginia Tech are working on technology “to detect nuclear activity, even in rogue countries that are not trusted with that technology.” The CHANDLER project “centers on a high-tech box full of luminescent plastic cubes stacked atop one another.” The piece explains that researchers say “neutrinos can tell them how much plutonium is inside a nuclear reactor, as a certain level is considered dangerous and only used to make weapons.”

Vanderbilt Engineers Unveil Smart Underwear.

WSMV-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Nashville, TN (8/2) reports on its website that engineers at Vanderbilt University “say they’ve figured out how to create sophisticated mechanized undergarments, also known as ‘smart underwear.’” The device is intended to “prevent back stress” and “has two fabric sections for the chest and legs that are connected by straps across the middle back. It works only when you need it, and a double tap engages the supportive straps.”

Clemson Researchers Participating In Bioengineering Research To Reduce Biopharmaceutical Research Costs.

The Greenville (SC) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) reports that Clemson University professor Sara Harcum is leading a research partnership with Tulane, the University of Delaware, and Delaware State to address “the increasingly inefficient production of biopharmaceuticals” which “is driving up the costs of life-saving drugs.” Using a $6 million federal grant, the researchers are “trying to crack the code of evolution in a single, 60-year-old line of ovarian cells from a Chinese hamster.” The researchers will attempt to “figure out the underlying mechanism for genetic drift in the 60-year-old hamster cell line — and turn it off.”

New Solar Powered Sunglasses Show Versatility Of Organic Solar Cell Technology.

TechCrunch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Coldewey) reports that engineers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have created a pair of sunglasses with organic solar cells housed in its lenses, demonstrating the cells’ flexibility for applications not possible with other solar power technologies. The lenses power two small displays showing temperature and brightness leaving about 200 milliwatts of power to drive a step counter, small speaker, or other low-power device and the energy collection happens in real time due to the absence of a battery in the assembly. The team has published its methodology in the journal Energy Technology.

Nanowerk Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) also reports on the KIT team’s sunglasses and points out that the technology could pave the way for solar cells in windows, overhead glazing, and building and high rise designs. The article says the solar cells are “very exciting devices due to their mechanical flexibility and the opportunity to adapt their color, transparency, shape, and size to the desired application.”

Memory Recovery, Retention Device To Overcome Dementia.

Med Device Online Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Marshall) reports on the work of Dr. Ada Poon, an associate profession of electrical engineering at Stanford University, who is “expecting to develop and complete clinical evaluation of an implantable electronic device intended to enable patients with Alzheimer’s disease – and other forms of dementia – to recover or retain memory function.” The article says, “Poon’s solution envisions a redundant backup system for the brain. The implant will be able to identify which neurons are most active at any given point in time, indicating they are currently being used for episodic memory.” Poon expects “the first five years of the project to result in demonstration of the device with rodents. The next five years will be focused on proving the science in a primate model, and finally, human clinical trials will be slated during the final 5 years of the project.”

Workforce

Facebook Announces Diversity Improvements, But Still Few Workers Of Color In Technical Positions.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Guynn) reports that Facebook announced this week that it “made progress in improving the gender and racial balance of its workers, with women, African Americans and Hispanics all gaining more representation in the Silicon Valley company’s ranks over the last year.” However, while “Facebook brought aboard more people of color,” it “fell short where the lack of diversity is most acute, in the proportion of African-American and Hispanic workers in technical roles, which has stayed flat at 1% and 3% respectively since 2014.”

CNN Money Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) reports Facebook “started voluntarily releasing the reports in 2014 to indicate their progress solving a long-standing problem in the technology industry.” This article says the reports have been “largely underwhelming” and “tend to contain language that’s sterile and prescriptive.”

Industry News

Nissan Engineers Solution To Remind Parents Not To Leave Children In Car.

Fox Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Wisner) reports on the new technology from Nissan that could “reduce the risks of hot car deaths.” Nissan engineer Elsa Foley explains that “If you open and close your rear door and then you drive somewhere and you don’t go back and open and close that rear door again, then you’ll get a message in your dashboard that says ‘hey, check the back seat before you leave.’ If you’re distracted and you don’t see that message, then when you get out of the car the horn will honk at you.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Wisconsin Transportation Officials Close Bridge Over Safety Concerns.

The Eau Claire (WI) Leader-Telegram Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) cites Chippewa County, Wisconsin officials as saying that the Cobban Bridge over the Chippewa River was closed on Wednesday due to concerns over the safety of the bridge’s fracture critical steel components. Chippewa County Highway Commissioner Brian Kelley said in a news release, “Annual bridge safety inspections were performed on July 19 and 20, and at that time, slight changes to the bridge condition were documented. These changes were reviewed by bridge engineers from the Federal Highway Administration and Wisconsin Department of Transportation, with the recommendation being that Chippewa County officials consider closing the bridge.”

DOE Launches Initiative To Connect Clean Energy Projects To Funding.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Subscription Publication) reports that the Department of Energy has dedicated $7.8 million on an initiative aimed at connecting energy startups with underutilized sources of wealth, such as pension funds, insurance companies and philanthropic foundations. The initiative aims to address obstacles to early energy projects, like “inconsistent funding, [and] the lack of access to expensive equipment.” Known as the Innovative Pathways project, it “appears to be a rare instance of harmony between the clean energy policies of DOE under the Obama and Trump administrations.”

More Information Known About How Outer Banks Outage Happened.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Drew) reports “workers were setting aside equipment that wasn’t in use when they caused a massive power outage that drove thousands of tourists from two islands in the Outer Banks, North Carolina transportation officials said.” The new information “on how the accident happened came as utility officials announced that they hope to have power restored to Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands by early next week,” over “nine days after the underground cables were damaged. Even a weeklong outage is enough to dent the bottom lines of island businesses, some of which are suing PCL Construction.”

Indiana Mayor Makes Solar Push Ahead Of Change In State Law.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) reports the mayor of Bloomington, Indiana “is making a push to expand the use of solar power in the city before a new state law curtails the economic benefits to Indiana’s solar panel owners.” The mayor “is planning an estimated $15 million project for solar systems at 29 city buildings and sites, such as its wastewater treatment plant and city fire stations.” The project “would result in 14 percent of city government’s electricity coming from solar.”

Proposed Wind Farm Would Be First To Match Offshore Wind, Battery Storage.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/1, Subscription Publication) reports that Deepwater Wind and Tesla have proposed building an offshore wind farm tied to battery storage off the coast of Massachusetts. The project is one of several proposals under consideration by the state as part of Massachusetts’ push to satisfy a law requiring a portion of state power to come from clean energy sources by 2022. If approved, the 114-megawatt project would be the first “pairing of offshore wind and energy storage in the U.S.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Nebraska DOE Releases Draft Science Standards Which Calls On Students To Evaluate Climate Science.

The Omaha (NE) World-Herald Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2) reports that the Nebraska Department of Education has released a new draft of state science standards which includes language on climate science for the first time ever. Students “would ‘evaluate the reliability and validity’ of climate models,” whereas a previous draft “worded the climate change standards as settled science.”

Colorado School Of Mines “Revamps” Summer STEM Program.

The Denver Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/2, Baumann) reports that the Colorado School of Mines is revamping an “intensive academic summer camp” to introduce students to STEM subjects. The article quotes program director Louisa Duley saying, “We introduce STEM programs to underrepresented students all over Colorado and Oklahoma. Ethnic, rural, socio-economic and female backgrounds are all underrepresented in STEM.” Duley adds that “some of the region’s best and brightest juniors and seniors are chosen for the program from a pool of more than 300 applicants.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier announces seven new neuroscience and psychology books
Elsevier, the information analytics company specialising in science and health, has announced an updated version of the most authoritative resource available on the study of learning and memory and its mechanisms.Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference, Second Edition incorporates the expertise of more than 150 outstanding investigators in the field, providing a ‘one-stop’ collection of reputable information with easy cross-referencing of related articles. It also announced six additional new neuroscience and psychology books.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 CAB Thesaurus receives major update for 2017 edition
The widely acclaimed CAB Thesaurus has received a major update for the 2017 edition, making it easier to access the world’s largest source of terminology covering the applied life sciences. The search tool now provides a controlled vocabulary resource approaching 2.7 million descriptive terms.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 Digital options are boosting space creativity and flexibility, reveals ProQuest survey
As libraries increasingly function as ‘community hubs,’ public librarians are prioritising space reclamation to create collaborative spaces, maker/hacker spaces and meeting rooms. This is according to a new ProQuestsurvey of public librarians about their views, plans and strategies related to space reclamation.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 The National Library of Medicine names Jerry Sheehan as new NLM Deputy Director
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced the appointment of Jerry Sheehan as the new NLM Deputy Director, effective July 31, 2017. The appointment was announced by Library Director Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD. The world’s largest biomedical library, NLM serves as a national and international resource of biomedical and genomic data for scientists, health professionals, academia, and the public.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 The State Library of Iowa partners with Credo to expand Iowans’ access to foundational research materials
Students and residents across Iowa will now enjoy increased access to foundational research materials as the State Library of Iowa and Credo Reference have partnered on a state-wide agreement that will bring Credo’s flagship exploratory research platform to public and academic libraries. At a time when finding information online means navigating around fake news sites and biased sources, easy access to authoritative sources is critical for meeting Iowans’ academic, professional, and personal information needs.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 ACCUCOMS to represent Canadian Science Publishing in the Middle East and North Africa
ACCUCOMS and Canadian Science Publishing (CSP) have agreed to expand their collaboration. ACCUCOMS will be representing CSP in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in addition to the current agreement in Latin America from August 1, 2017. As a result of a number of successful years in Latin America, CSP has decided to expand their collaboration with ACCUCOMS by adding the rapidly developing Middle East and North Africa (MENA).
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

 ARL invites applications and nominations for participation in 2018–2019 ARL Leadership Fellows program
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is inviting applications and nominations for participation in the 2018–2019 ARL Leadership Fellows program, with a deadline of August 28, 2017. This executive leadership program facilitates the development of future senior-level leaders in large research libraries and archives. Candidates are welcomed from ARL and non-ARL institutions. Applicants from traditionally underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert