Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

CAS and BioOhio team up to organise Big Data: Data-Driven Insights in Health Care
CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, and BioOhio, Ohio’s bioscience membership organisation, are organising the Harnessing Big Data: Data-Driven Insights in Health Care. This highly anticipated event will share real world examples and case studies of how Big Data is being leveraged to address critical issues and opportunities shaping the healthcare industry.
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Elsevier announces new reference modules in life sciences, and neuroscience and biobehavioral psychology
STM publisher Elsevier has announced two new Reference Modules, the first in Life Sciences, and the second in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Psychology. Each will provide researchers, clinicians, educators and students access to reference content updated as science progresses. The new Reference Modules are available now for pre-sale; access for users will begin on ScienceDirect in November 2016.
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More than 50 impactful Springer Nature scientific and medical journals integrated into popular ProQuest databases
ProQuest has added an additional 58 highly influential scientific and medical journals from Springer Nature to its databases. New titles include seven Nature Reviews journals in clinical medicine, biology, and materials sciences and several academic & society titles published by Springer Nature, including the American Journal of Gastroenterology and Translational Psychiatry.
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American Chemical Society announces support to Dutch Universities’ Open Access goals
The American Chemical Society’s Publications Division (ACS) and VSNU have reached an agreement whereby open access publishing arrangements will be a part of the subscription licensing contract between the US-based professional society and the Dutch institutions. From 2017 onward, any new articles accepted for publication within ACS peer-reviewed journals that are submitted by a Corresponding Author affiliated with a Dutch university or other participating research institution will be published open access, without extra fees to the author.
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EBSCO Information Services continues to support open source technology for libraries
EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) continues to provide support in advocating open source and open access. EBSCO has agreed to provide additional financial support to Koha, the world’s first full-featured, free open source Integrated Library System (ILS) that is used worldwide by more than 15,000 libraries of all types.
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Overleaf and Oxford University Press announce new partnership
Overleaf has announced a new partnership with Oxford University Press (OUP). OUP is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University’s objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. Through this partnership, authors submitting to OUP’s Biostatistics journal will have access to the Overleaf collaborative cloud-based writing and reviewing tool.
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Koç University opts for Ex Libris campusM mobile app platform
Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, has announced that Istanbul-based Koç University, one of the leading academic and research institutions in Turkey, has chosen the Ex Libris campusM® Enterprise platform for developing and delivering personalised applications and services to students and staff. With campusM, the University will now be able to offer students highly personalised services via native mobile apps.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Research Indicates Consumers Are Ignorant And Wary Of Hybrid, Autonomous Cars.

Reuters  (5/26, White) reports that a new Harris Poll found that US customers are ignorant about electric and hybrid vehicles, with 76% of respondents saying they are “not at all sure” about the range a plug-in hybrid car could travel on a single charge and underestimating the range by more than half. A separate British survey found that 55% of respondents answered that they weren’t likely to want to ride in an autonomous car. Similarly, a University of Michigan survey found similar sentiments in the US. However, automakers are Under increased pressure to sell more hybrid vehicles to comply with emission limits and EV sales mandates.

Popular Science  (5/26, Griggs) also reports on the University of Michigan poll, which found that upwards of “45 percent wanted no self-driving capabilities” compared to “only 15 percent” who “wanted a completely self-driving car.” In addition, researchers wrote that “two thirds of respondents” felt “either very or moderately concerned” about riding in fully autonomous vehicles.

Higher Education

Regeneron Says It Will Sponsor Science Talent Search.

The New York Times  (5/26, Hardy, Subscription Publication) reports that Regeneron Pharmaceuticals plans to be the new sponsor of the nationwide Science Talent Search, a contest that “counts among its finalists several Nobel Prize winners, as well as university professors, popular science authors and business executives.” Regeneron is taking over from Intel and said it would devote $100 million to the competition over 10 years. The Times says the contest sponsorship “increasingly reflects the state of American business as it relates to education in so-called STEM subjects, or science, technology, engineering and mathematics.” The Wall Street Journal  (5/26, Winslow, Subscription Publication) and Reuters  (5/26, Pierson) provide similar coverage.

College Graduation Rates Increasing, But Gender And Racial Gaps Still Exist.

The Hechinger Report  (5/26, Zinshteyn) reports the federal Condition of Education 2016 report released Thursday by the National Center for Education Statistics found the graduation rate for first-time students seeking bachelor’s degrees was 60 percent in 2014, a slight increase from 57.7 percent in 2000, “but stubborn racial and gender gaps are widening.” The percentage of white 25-29-year-olds attaining bachelor’s degrees between 1995 and 2015 increased from 29 to 43 percent, widening the gap with blacks, which went from 15 to 21 percent, and Hispanics, which rose 9 to 16 percent. The study found 39 percent of women aged 25 to 29 had received a bachelor’s degree in 2015, compared to 32 percent of men. More women than men are graduating from college—in 2015, 39 percent of women compared to 32 percent of men—but in “virtually every one of the 10 major economic sectors, men outearned women and white workers were paid more than Black or Hispanic workers.” Asian students boosted their graduation rate from 43 to 63 percent, and “generally had higher wages than white workers with bachelor’s degrees.”

East Stroudsburg Unviersity Dropping Mandatory Submission Of ACT, SAT Scores.

The Lehigh Valley (PA) Express Times  (5/26, Satullo) reports Pennsylvania’s East Stroudsburg University is the first state school to eliminate “the mandatory submission of an applicant’s SAT and ACT scores” starting in the spring of 2017. Over 850 colleges and universities nationwide have made the change. David Bousquet, vice president for enrollment management, explained, “By removing the stigma of poor standardized test results, we hope to remove a barrier for students who don’t think their SAT or ACT scores are accurate indicators of their academic ability.”

Report: States Are Wrong To Base Higher Education Funding On Performance.

The Washington Post  (5/26, Douglas-Gabriel) reports a Century Foundation paper by assistant professor of education at the University of Wisconsin at Madison Nicholas Hillman agues that by tying public college and university funding to the schools’ ability to retain and graduate students, states are reinforcing disparities within public higher education and doing little to move the needle on completion. According to Hillman, many different factors account for students’ failure to graduate, and these factors can only be properly address by colleges that have ample funding. Hillman said, “If we truly want to make progress towards a completion agenda and improve educational outcomes, we have to make sure that we have every college on an equal playing field with an adequate amount of resources to perform…We’ve got it all backwards to tell colleges to perform first, without actually addressing their capacity constraints.”

From ASEE
EDITOR NEEDED: Journal of Engineering Education
ASEE members recognize JEE as the world’s premier journal on the scholarship of engineering and engineering technology education. Read more if you’d like to be considered as the next editor.
Retention Strategies
Going the Distance” is a video showcasing effective retention strategies at six universities.

ASEE has done extensive work on retention and time-to-graduation rates over the previous several years. A good distillation was recently done by consultant Cindy Veenstra.

Research and Development

Study Suggests Data Taken From Car’s Internal Computer Can Determine Driver In Minutes.

Wired  (5/25) reports a new study suggests that data collected by a car you regularly drive “can probably identify you based on that driving style as little as a few minutes behind the wheel.” The study by researchers from the University of Washington and the UC San Diego found they could identify drivers only based on data collected from a car’s internal computer network known as a CAN bus. They also determined “that the data collected from a car’s brake pedal alone could let them correctly distinguish the correct driver out of 15 individuals” nearly 90 percent of the time after just 15 minutes of driving. After 90 minutes of monitored driving, “they could pick out the correct driver fully 100 percent of the time.”

University Of Arizona Professor Designing Guided Systems To Automate Parts Of Some Surgeries.

In a radio broadcast, KJZZ-FM  Phoenix (5/24, Brodie) reported Jerzy Rozenblit, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona who has a joint appointment in the surgery department in the College of Medicine, is working on developing guided systems for surgeries. Rozenblit’s systems are used for training on “minimally-invasive procedures” and emphasize “a non-patient-based learning environment.” Rozenblit believes, in the future, “we will definitely transition from open surgery to more laparoscopic/endoscopic procedures with very strong computer systems that, in our view, really provide improved situation awareness.” He also suggests that automated surgery may be normalized in 20 to 30 years.

Researchers Mimic iPhone Force Touch Feature With Software Update Using Ultrasonics.

TechCrunch  (5/26, Coldewey) reports that researchers at the University of Michigan have created a feature similar to Apple’s Force touch that uses ultrasound to detect pressure changes, rather than “sensors in the touchscreen.” According to TechCrunch, the phone can detect changes to an emitted sound caused by pressure on the screen or body of the device. The research team will present its work at MobiSys in Singapore next month. Gizmodo  (5/26, Liszewski) adds that the feature can be added to any phone with a software update – dubbed ForcePhone – that will use devices’ speakers and microphones to detect changes to the 18 kHz tone (which is well out of the range of human hearing) caused by pressure on the phone screen or body.

Industry News

Microsoft, Facebook Partner To Build Transatlantic Subsea Cable.

Reuters  (5/26, Goliya) reports that Microsoft Corp and Facebook Inc have partnered to build a 6,600 kilometer cable subsea cable – dubbed MAREA – crossing the Atlantic Ocean between the US and Southern Europe to handle increased demand for high-speed online and cloud services. The AP  (5/26) adds that “the project will be operated by an affiliate of Spanish telecommunications firm Telefonica” and “will connect data hubs in Northern Virginia and Bilbao, Spain.” According to Bloomberg News  (5/26, Bass), the cable will be “designed to have a bandwidth of as much as 160 terabytes per second” – the “highest capacity one of its kind under the Atlantic.” The companies will begin construction in August and expect to finish in October 2017.

Wired  (5/26, Metz) reports that “Facebook is buying up what’s called ‘dark fiber’ – unused terrestrial cables” in order to “control how its data moves from place to place and move it more efficiently.” Data moved by “a few online giants” – including Google, Microsoft, and Facebook – now represents “more than two thirds of the digital data moving across the Atlantic,” up from ten percent “just a few years ago,” according to telecommunications research firm Telegeography. Sources offer similar coverage include Newsweek  (5/26, Burningham), US News & World Report  (5/26, Risen), USA Today  (5/26, Weise), The Verge  (5/26, Statt), and the Wall Street Journal  (5/26, Fitzgerald, Subscription Publication).

Firm Predicts Industry Shift From Glass To Plastic OLED Displays.

Android Authority  (5/26, Triggs) reports that the plastic OLED panel industry appears “set for a boom across the handset, tablet, TV, and wearable segments,” according to IDTechEx Research forecasts – which predict the “flexible OLED market will bring in over $12 billion in revenue” in 2016 and up to “$57 billion by 2026” based on an industry shift from glass to plastic substrates. IDTechEx expects mobile phones to lead the shift, enabling the creation of “truly bendable and foldable mobile devices” in the future, followed by tablets and notebooks. The firm also expects “new markets in the augmented and virtual reality spaces” to strengthen demand in the near term, though TVs will remain dependent on glass-based displays “for a while longer” because “scaling-up OLED production size is proving expensive.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Colorado Senators Seek Return Of Natural Gas Royalties Set Aside For Anvil Points Cleanup.

The AP  (5/26) reports Colorado Sens. Michael Bennet (D) and Cory Gardner (R) have “introduced a provision” to the National Defense Authorization Act to return the $32 million to $80 million in natural gas royalties that remain in a fund after paying “for the cleanup of the Anvil Points oil shale research site near Rifle.”

Snyder: Calls For Halt To Internal Flint Probe After Complaints.

The Detroit Free Press  (5/26, Egan) reports Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder on Thursday called for the “Office of the Auditor General and the DHHS Inspector General to temporarily suspend their internal investigations” into the Flint drinking water crisis after Attorney General Bill Schuette and US Attorney Barbara McQuade “complained it was complicating – and potentially compromising – his ongoing criminal investigation.” Schuette and McQuade also both criticized an internal Michigan State Police investigation. Assistant US Attorney John Neal said in a letter to the state attorney general’s office that Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) employees “were told they could lose their jobs if they didn’t answer questions during the internal MSP investigation,” as the courts “could view that evidence as ‘compelled statements,’ which could taint the ongoing federal criminal investigation.”

Michigan Environmental Quality Chief: Fired Employees “Thrown Under The Bus.” The Detroit News  (5/26, Oosting, Livengood) reports DEQ chief deputy director Jim Sygo, in a March 1 voluntary interview with MPS, defended former Office of Drinking Water and Municipal Assistance chief Liane Shekter Smith and regulator Stephen Busch, who were fired for their roles in the Flint water crisis after a Snyder-appointed task force “found that the DEQ failed to require corrosion control chemicals when the city began using Flint River water in April 2014.” Sygo claimed the two were “thrown under the bus.” Lt. Lisa Rish wrote in a report that Sygo “felt there was politics involved.”

Coalition Calls On Moniz To End Support Of TCEP.

The “Morning Energy” blog of Politico  (5/26) reported a coalition of Taxpayers for Common Sense, Friends of the Earth and The R Street Institute has sent a letter to Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz arguing for an end to support for the Texas Clean Energy Project. The project “will burn gassified coal and use carbon capture technology to hold down its greenhouse gas emissions.” TCEP “has missed some key milestones, and while DOE suspended its funding, it recently gave the project an extension of its cooperative support agreement, which allows the department to restart the money spigot.”

E&E Publishing  (5/27, Subscription Publication) reports that regarding the extension, the coalition wrote, “This is a worrying development for both taxpayers and the environment. … Extending the project’s cooperative agreement and leaving open the possibility to provide further support only increases the department’s financial exposure.” The project “has significant support on Capitol Hill, including from House lawmakers who pressed” Moniz “on the suspended funding during recent appropriations hearings.”

Chemical Industry Pushed For Greater EPA Oversight Amid “Hodgepodge” Of State Rules.

Bloomberg Politics  (5/26, Kaskey) reports the Senate is poised to send President Obama a revised Toxic Substances Control Act that would expand “the Environmental Protection Agency’s oversight of chemicals used in products such as spot cleaners and paint strippers.” The chemical industry, including lobbyists for DuPont and Dow Chemical pushed for the legislation to provide companies with consistent rules to follow over the “hodgepodge of retailer bans, consumer boycotts and state regulations.” The compromise legislation would require EPA to focus on “high-priority” chemicals already in the marketplace and would also require the EPA to review the safety of new chemicals before commercial introduction. The American Chemistry Council said on its website that eroded confidence in EPA regulation of chemicals prompted state legislatures “to create their own chemicals management laws and on retailers to pull products from the shelves, often based on the claims of activists rather than scientific conclusions.”

CPUC Grants SCE Energy Storage Procurement To Alleviate Risk Of Blackouts.

Reuters  (5/26) reports the California Public Utilities Commission has granted Southern California Edison energy storage procurement authority in an effort to alleviate electric reliability risks to the Los Angeles area as a result of the Aliso Canyon natural gas leak. The Los Angeles Times  (5/26, Penn) reports the CPUC “wants Southern California Edison to expedite plans to acquire electricity storage using batteries to help prevent potential blackouts.” CPUC president Michael Picker said, “We’re doing what we can to expedite the next generation of energy solutions in that very constrained piece of California’s infrastructure. …This is one important part of the overall effort.”

Nevada Task Force Recommends Rooftop Solar “Grandfathering.”

The AP  (5/26) reports Nevada’s New Energy Industry Task Force “wants to allow the state’s early-adopter rooftop solar customers to go back to an older, more favorable rate structure.” On Thursday, the task force voted “to recommend a bill be drafted that would ‘grandfather’ customers who applied to go solar by Dec. 31, 2015.” The panel recommended permitting “customers keep the lower rates for 20 years from the date their system started operating.”

Work Has Started On Large Minnesota Solar Project.

The AP  (5/26) reports that work has begun “on one of Minnesota’s largest solar projects,” located in Lyon County, which “will generate enough electricity to power about 15,000 homes.” The project “on 355 acres near Marshall will be owned and operated by Marshall Solar, a subsidiary of NextEra Energy Resources in partnership with Xcel Energy.” The Marshall Solar Energy Project, according to Xcel, will be the third-biggest solar installation in the state.

Elementary/Secondary Education

California Education Officials Discussing How To Build College, Career Readiness Metric.

EdSource  (5/25, Leal) reports California education officials are considering “at least a dozen elements” as the state designs its “first tool to gauge college and career readiness at high schools.” The career readiness metric, which would meet new state and federal guidelines, could be adopted in September and implemented in the 2017-18 school year. A preliminary version of the metric is expected when the state Board of Education meets July 13-14. Some elements under consideration are the amount of AP and Career Technical Education courses a school offers, the percentage of students who take college entrance and AP exams, the percentage of students concurrently enrolled in college credit courses at a community center, and more. The challenge building a metric “that takes into account the different goals prioritized across California’s high schools,” California Department of Education Deputy Superintendent Keric Ashley informed board members earlier this month.

Texas Math Standards Almost Identical To Common Core.

Slate  (5/26) reports on a Hechinger Report story by Sarah Garland, who writes that according to experts, “even in a state that said an emphatic “No!” to Common Core, the new math standards here are pretty similar to the standards the state rejected.” According to Slate, “the Texas standards reference ‘Adding It Up,’ a major 2001 study by the National Research Council about how children learn math, a study also explicitly cited by the Common Core standards writers.”

Students Talk Science And Technology At Denver Broncos Stadium.

The Denver Post  (5/26, Chuang) reports “several Broncos employees who shared a different side of working for the NFL team – the science, technology, engineering and math side – with students Thursday at Sports Authority Field at Mile High.” According to the Denver Post, Montrose High School pre-engineering students were able to learn and understand “how to put STEM degrees to work at places such as Sports Authority Field – from building and maintaining the turf to working in the ThunderVision Control Room.”

Op-Ed: Underrepresented Groups Need Hand Up In STEM Education.

In an op-ed for US News & World Report  (5/26), contributor Vince Bertram writes about the “100 middle-school boys in the nation’s capital” who “are set to take part in a new technology-education program in late June that will teach them, among other things, 3-D modeling and app development” funded by a $395,000 grant from Verizon. Black and Hispanic youths chosen for the Verizon Minority Male Makers Program, a four-week summer boot camp at the University of the District of Columbia, will explore future career opportunities in the technology sector, a field where minorities are underrepresented.

Branstad Signs CTE Bill Into Law.

The Cedar Rapids (IA) Gazette  (5/26, Crippes) reports on legislation aimed at modernizing career technical education throughout the state signed by Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad into law on Thursday. According to Branstad, “the legislation is aimed at making sure students graduate “genuinely ready” for college or career training. It also helps with the Future Ready Iowa goal of ensuring 70 percent of Iowa’s workforce have education or training beyond high school by 2025.”

North Carolina Middle School Students Build Underwater Remote Operated Vehicles.

The Hickory (NC) Daily Record  (5/26) reports students at Newton-Conover Middle School in Newton, North Carolina have “learned to see any problem as an opportunity to succeed after spending the last few weeks building two SeaPerch Underwater Remote Operated Vehicles.” As part of a STEM project at the school, the students demonstrated their ROVs at the Shuford YMCA pool Wednesday in front of to teachers and administrators. Charles Draper, the teacher of the school’s Exception Children class, said the program has “allowed them to use math, science, technology, engineering in the classroom in a practical way and to use those skills to build a final product.”

Thursday’s Lead Stories

Google, FCA Begin Work On Autonomous Minivans In Detroit Suburbs.
NSF Grant To Fund STEM Scholarship Program At Austin College.
Researchers, Legal Experts Debate Implications Of AI Advancements.
For First Time Ever, Clean-Energy Jobs Overtake Those In Oil, Natural Gas Extraction.
Apple Rumored To Be Exploring EV Charging Technology.
House Advances Toward Conference On Energy Bill.
Middle School Students Build Underwater Remote Operated Vehicles.

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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 143 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 143 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 143 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Comparison of pollutant concentrations from weekly discrete versus composite samples for residential dry-weather runoff Pitton, B.J.L., Dodge, L.L., Gan, J., Greco, S.E., Haver, D.L., Lee, E., Majcherek, T.J., Oki, L.R. 2016 Journal of Environmental Management ,
180 pp. 10 – 16 .
2 . Human fecal and pathogen exposure pathways in rural Indian villages and the effect of increased latrine coverage Odagiri, M., Schriewer, A., Daniels, M.E., Wuertz, S., Smith, W.A., Clasen, T., Schmidt, W.-P., Jin, Y., Torondel, B., Misra, P.R., Panigrahi, P., Jenkins, M.W. 2016 Water Research ,
100 pp. 232 – 244 .
3 . A combinatorial analysis of Severi degrees Liu, F. 2016 Advances in Mathematics ,
298 pp. 1 – 50 .
4 . Cell-based tissue engineering strategies used in the clinical repair of articular cartilage Huang, B.J., Hu, J.C., Athanasiou, K.A. 2016 Biomaterials ,
98 pp. 1 – 22 .
5 . Search for supersymmetry in the multijet and missing transverse momentum final state in pp collisions at 13 TeV Khachatryan, V., Sirunyan, A.M., Tumasyan, A., Adam, W., Asilar, E., Bergauer, T., Brandstetter, J., Brondolin, E., Dragicevic, M., Erö, J., Flechl, M., Friedl, M., Frühwirth, R., Ghete, V.M., Hartl, C., Hörmann, N., Hrubec, J., Jeitler, M., König, A., Krätschmer, I., Liko, D., Matsushita, T., Mikulec, I., Rabady, D., Rad, N., Rahbaran, B., Rohringer, H., Schieck, J., Strauss, J., Treberer-Treberspurg, W., Waltenberger, W., Wulz, C.-E., Mossolov, V., Shumeiko, N., Suarez Gonzalez, J., Alderweireldt, S., Cornelis, T., De Wolf, E.A., Janssen, X., Knutsson, A., Lauwers, J., Luyckx, S., Van De Klundert, M., Van Haevermaet, H., Van Mechelen, P., Van Remortel, N., Van Spilbeeck, A., Abu Zeid, S., Blekman, F., D’Hondt, J., Daci, N., De Bruyn, I., Deroover, K., Heracleous, N., Lowette, S., Moortgat, S., Moreels, L., Olbrechts, A., Python, Q., Tavernier, S., Van Doninck, W., Van Mulders, P., Van Parijs, I., Brun, H., Caillol, C., Clerbaux, B., De Lentdecker, G., Delannoy, H., Fasanella, G., Favart, L., Goldouzian, R., Grebenyuk, A., Karapostoli, G., Lenzi, T., Léonard, A., Maerschalk, T., Marinov, A., Randle-conde, A., Seva, T., Vander Velde, C., Vanlaer, P., Yonamine, R., Zenoni, F., Zhang, F., Cimmino, A., Dobur, D., Fagot, A., Garcia, G., Gul, M., Mccartin, J., Poyraz, D., Salva, S., Schöfbeck, R., Tytgat, M., Van Driessche, W., Yazgan, E., Zaganidis, N., Beluffi, C., Bondu, O., Brochet, S., Bruno, G., Caudron, A., Ceard, L., De Visscher, S., Delaere, C., Delcourt, M., Forthomme, L., Francois, B., Giammanco, A., Jafari, A., Jez, P., Komm, M., Lemaitre, V., Magitteri, A., Mertens, A., Musich, M., Nuttens, C., Piotrzkowski, K., Quertenmont, L., Selvaggi, M., Vidal Marono, M., Wertz, S., Beliy, N., Aldá Júnior, W.L., Alves, F.L., Alves, G.A., Brito, L., Correa Martins Junior, M., Hensel, C., Moraes, A., Pol, M.E., Rebello Teles, P., Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E., Carvalho, W., Chinellato, J., Custódio, A., Da Costa, E.M., Da Silveira, G.G., De Jesus Damiao, D., De Oliveira Martins, C., Fonseca De Souza, S., Huertas Guativa, L.M., Malbouisson, H., Matos Figueiredo, D., Mora Herrera, C., Mundim, L., Nogima, H., Prado Da Silva, W.L., Santoro, A., Sznajder, A., Tonelli Manganote, E.J., Vilela Pereira, A., Ahuja, S., Bernardes, C.A., Dogra, S., Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.R., Gregores, E.M., Mercadante, P.G., Moon, C.S., Novaes, S.F., Padula, S.S., Romero Abad, D., Ruiz Vargas, J.C., Aleksandrov, A., Hadjiiska, R., Iaydjiev, P., Rodozov, M., Stoykova, S., Sultanov, G., Vutova, M., Dimitrov, A., Glushkov, I., Litov, L., Pavlov, B., Petkov, P., Fang, W., Ahmad, M., Bian, J.G., Chen, G.M., Chen, H.S., Chen, M., Chen, Y., Cheng, T., Du, R., Jiang, C.H., Leggat, D., Liu, Z., Romeo, F., Shaheen, S.M., Spiezia, A., Tao, J., Wang, C., Wang, Z., Zhang, H., Zhao, J., Asawatangtrakuldee, C., Ban, Y., Li, Q., Liu, S., Mao, Y., Qian, S.J., Wang, D., Xu, Z., Avila, C., Cabrera, A., Chaparro Sierra, L.F., Florez, C., Gomez, J.P., Ruiz Alvarez, J.D., Sanabria, J.C., Godinovic, N., Lelas, D., Puljak, I., Ribeiro Cipriano, P.M., Antunovic, Z., Kovac, M., Brigljevic, V., Ferencek, D., Kadija, K., Luetic, J., Micanovic, S., Sudic, L., Attikis, A., Mavromanolakis, G., Mousa, J., Nicolaou, C., Ptochos, F., Razis, P.A., Rykaczewski, H., Finger, M., Finger, M., Carrera Jarrin, E., Abdelalim, A.A., El-khateeb, E., Mahmoud, M.A., Radi, A., Calpas, B., Kadastik, M., Murumaa, M., Perrini, L., Raidal, M., Tiko, A., Veelken, C., Eerola, P., Pekkanen, J., Voutilainen, M., Härkönen, J., Karimäki, V., Kinnunen, R., Lampén, T., Lassila-Perini, K., Lehti, S., Lindén, T., Luukka, P., Peltola, T., Tuominiemi, J., Tuovinen, E., Wendland, L., Talvitie, J., Tuuva, T., Besancon, M., Couderc, F., Dejardin, M., Denegri, D., Fabbro, B., Faure, J.L., Favaro, C., Ferri, F., Ganjour, S., Ghosh, S., Givernaud, A., Gras, P., Hamel de Monchenault, G., Jarry, P., Locci, E., Machet, M., Malcles, J., Rander, J., Rosowsky, A., Titov, M., Zghiche, A., Abdulsalam, A., Antropov, I., Baffioni, S., Beaudette, F., Busson, P., Cadamuro, L., Chapon, E., Charlot, C., Davignon, O., Granier de Cassagnac, R., Jo, M., Lisniak, S., Miné, P., Naranjo, I.N., Nguyen, M., Ochando, C., Ortona, G., Paganini, P., Pigard, P., Regnard, S., Salerno, R., Sirois, Y., Strebler, T., Yilmaz, Y., Zabi, A., Agram, J.-L., Andrea, J., Aubin, A., Bloch, D., Brom, J.-M., Buttignol, M., Chabert, E.C., Chanon, N., Collard, C., Conte, E., Coubez, X., Fontaine, J.-C., Gelé, D., Goerlach, U., Le Bihan, A.-C., Merlin, J.A., Skovpen, K., Van Hove, P., Gadrat, S., Beauceron, S., Bernet, C., Boudoul, G., Bouvier, E., Carrillo Montoya, C.A., Chierici, R., Contardo, D., Courbon, B., Depasse, P., El Mamouni, H., Fan, J., Fay, J., Gascon, S., Gouzevitch, M., Grenier, G., Ille, B., Lagarde, F., Laktineh, I.B., Lethuillier, M., Mirabito, L., Pequegnot, A.L., Perries, S., Popov, A., Sabes, D., Sordini, 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Salerno, D., Yang, Y., Chen, K.H., Doan, T.H., Jain, S., Khurana, R., Konyushikhin, M., Kuo, C.M., Lin, W., Lu, Y.J., Pozdnyakov, A., Yu, S.S., Kumar, A., Chang, P., Chang, Y.H., Chang, Y.W., Chao, Y., Chen, K.F., Chen, P.H., Dietz, C., Fiori, F., Hou, W.-S., Hsiung, Y., Liu, Y.F., Lu, R.-S., Miñano Moya, M., Paganis, E., Tsai, J.F., Tzeng, Y.M., Asavapibhop, B., Singh, G., Srimanobhas, N., Suwonjandee, N., Adiguzel, A., Cerci, S., Damarseckin, S., Demiroglu, Z.S., Dozen, C., Dumanoglu, I., Girgis, S., Gokbulut, G., Guler, Y., Gurpinar, E., Hos, I., Kangal, E.E., Kayis Topaksu, A., Onengut, G., Ozdemir, K., Sunar Cerci, D., Tali, B., Zorbilmez, C., Bilin, B., Bilmis, S., Isildak, B., Karapinar, G., Yalvac, M., Zeyrek, M., Gülmez, E., Kaya, M., Kaya, O., Yetkin, E.A., Yetkin, T., Cakir, A., Cankocak, K., Sen, S., Vardarli, F.I., Grynyov, B., Levchuk, L., Sorokin, P., Aggleton, R., Ball, F., Beck, L., Brooke, J.J., Burns, D., Clement, E., Cussans, D., Flacher, H., Goldstein, J., Grimes, M., Heath, G.P., Heath, H.F., Jacob, J., Kreczko, L., Lucas, C., Meng, Z., Newbold, D.M., Paramesvaran, S., Poll, A., Sakuma, T., Seif El Nasr-storey, S., Senkin, S., Smith, D., Smith, V.J., Bell, K.W., Belyaev, A., Brew, C., Brown, R.M., Calligaris, L., Cieri, D., Cockerill, D.J.A., Coughlan, J.A., Harder, K., Harper, S., Olaiya, E., Petyt, D., Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H., Thea, A., Tomalin, I.R., Williams, T., Baber, M., Bainbridge, R., Buchmuller, O., Bundock, A., Burton, D., Casasso, S., Citron, M., Colling, D., Corpe, L., Dauncey, P., Davies, G., De Wit, A., Della Negra, M., Dunne, P., Elwood, A., Futyan, D., Haddad, Y., Hall, G., Iles, G., Lane, R., Laner, C., Lucas, R., Lyons, L., Magnan, A.-M., Malik, S., Mastrolorenzo, L., Nash, J., Nikitenko, A., Pela, J., Penning, B., Pesaresi, M., Raymond, D.M., Richards, A., Rose, A., Seez, C., Tapper, A., Uchida, K., Vazquez Acosta, M., Virdee, T., Zenz, S.C., Cole, J.E., Hobson, P.R., Khan, A., Kyberd, P., Leslie, D., Reid, I.D., Symonds, P., Teodorescu, L., Turner, M., Borzou, A., Call, K., Dittmann, J., Hatakeyama, K., Liu, H., Pastika, N., Charaf, O., Cooper, S.I., Henderson, C., Rumerio, P., Arcaro, D., Avetisyan, A., Bose, T., Gastler, D., Rankin, D., Richardson, C., Rohlf, J., Sulak, L., Zou, D., Benelli, G., Berry, E., Cutts, D., Ferapontov, A., Garabedian, A., Hakala, J., Heintz, U., Jesus, O., Laird, E., Landsberg, G., Mao, Z., Narain, M., Piperov, S., Sagir, S., Spencer, E., Syarif, R., Breedon, R., Breto, G., Burns, D., Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M., Chauhan, S., Chertok, M., Conway, J., Conway, R., Cox, P.T., Erbacher, R., Flores, C., Funk, G., Gardner, M., Ko, W., Lander, R., Mclean, C., Mulhearn, M., Pellett, D., Pilot, J., Ricci-Tam, F., Shalhout, S., Smith, J., Squires, M., Stolp, D., Tripathi, M., Wilbur, S., Yohay, R., Cousins, R., Everaerts, P., Florent, A., Hauser, J., Ignatenko, M., Saltzberg, D., Takasugi, E., Valuev, V., Weber, M., Burt, K., Clare, R., Ellison, J., Gary, J.W., Hanson, G., Heilman, J., Jandir, P., Kennedy, E., Lacroix, F., Long, O.R., Malberti, M., Olmedo Negrete, M., Paneva, M.I., Shrinivas, A., Wei, H., Wimpenny, S., Yates, B.R., Branson, J.G., Cerati, G.B., Cittolin, S., D’Agnolo, R.T., Derdzinski, M., Gerosa, R., Holzner, A., Kelley, R., Klein, D., Letts, J., Macneill, I., Olivito, D., Padhi, S., Pieri, M., Sani, M., Sharma, V., Simon, S., Tadel, M., Vartak, A., Wasserbaech, S., Welke, C., Wood, J., Würthwein, F., Yagil, A., Zevi Della Porta, G., Bhandari, R., Bradmiller-Feld, J., Campagnari, C., Dishaw, A., Dutta, V., Flowers, K., Franco Sevilla, M., Geffert, P., George, C., Golf, F., Gouskos, L., Gran, J., Heller, R., Incandela, J., Mccoll, N., Mullin, S.D., Ovcharova, A., Richman, J., Stuart, D., Suarez, I., West, C., Yoo, J., Anderson, D., Apresyan, A., Bendavid, J., Bornheim, A., Bunn, J., Chen, Y., Duarte, J., Mott, A., Newman, H.B., Pena, C., Spiropulu, M., Vlimant, J.R., Xie, S., Zhu, R.Y., Andrews, M.B., Azzolini, V., Calamba, A., Carlson, B., Ferguson, T., Paulini, M., Russ, J., Sun, M., Vogel, H., Vorobiev, I., Cumalat, J.P., Ford, W.T., Jensen, F., Johnson, A., Krohn, M., Mulholland, T., Stenson, K., Wagner, S.R., Alexander, J., Chatterjee, A., Chaves, J., Chu, J., Dittmer, S., Eggert, N., Mirman, N., Nicolas Kaufman, G., Patterson, J.R., Rinkevicius, A., Ryd, A., Skinnari, L., Sun, W., Tan, S.M., Tao, Z., Teo, W.D., Thom, J., Thompson, J., Tucker, J., Weng, Y., Wittich, P., Winn, D., Abdullin, S., Albrow, M., Apollinari, G., Banerjee, S., Bauerdick, L.A.T., Beretvas, A., Berryhill, J., Bhat, P.C., Bolla, G., Burkett, K., Butler, J.N., Cheung, H.W.K., Chlebana, F., Cihangir, S., Cremonesi, M., Elvira, V.D., Fisk, I., Freeman, J., Gottschalk, E., Gray, L., Green, D., Grünendahl, S., Gutsche, O., Hare, D., Harris, R.M., Hasegawa, S., Hirschauer, J., Hu, Z., Jayatilaka, B., Jindariani, S., Johnson, M., Joshi, U., Klima, B., Kreis, B., Lammel, S., Linacre, J., Lincoln, D., Lipton, R., Liu, T., Lopes De Sá, R., Lykken, J., Maeshima, K., Marraffino, J.M., Maruyama, S., Mason, D., McBride, P., Merkel, P., Mrenna, S., Nahn, S., Newman-Holmes, C., O’Dell, V., Pedro, K., Prokofyev, O., Rakness, G., Ristori, L., Sexton-Kennedy, E., Soha, A., Spalding, W.J., Spiegel, L., Stoynev, S., Strobbe, N., Taylor, L., Tkaczyk, S., Tran, N.V., Uplegger, L., Vaandering, E.W., Vernieri, C., Verzocchi, M., Vidal, R., Wang, M., Weber, H.A., Whitbeck, A., Acosta, D., Avery, P., Bortignon, P., Bourilkov, D., Brinkerhoff, A., Carnes, A., Carver, M., Curry, D., Das, S., Field, R.D., Furic, I.K., Konigsberg, J., Korytov, A., Ma, P., Matchev, K., Mei, H., Milenovic, P., Mitselmakher, G., Rank, D., Shchutska, L., Sperka, D., Thomas, L., Wang, J., Wang, S., Yelton, J., Linn, S., Markowitz, P., Martinez, G., Rodriguez, J.L., Ackert, A., Adams, J.R., Adams, T., Askew, A., Bein, S., Diamond, B., Hagopian, S., Hagopian, V., Johnson, K.F., Khatiwada, A., Prosper, H., Santra, A., Weinberg, M., Baarmand, M.M., Bhopatkar, V., Colafranceschi, S., Hohlmann, M., Kalakhety, H., Noonan, D., Roy, T., Yumiceva, F., Adams, M.R., Apanasevich, L., Berry, D., Betts, R.R., Bucinskaite, I., Cavanaugh, R., Evdokimov, O., Gauthier, L., Gerber, C.E., Hofman, D.J., Kurt, P., O’Brien, C., Sandoval Gonzalez, I.D., Turner, P., Varelas, N., Wu, Z., Zakaria, M., Zhang, J., Bilki, B., Clarida, W., Dilsiz, K., Durgut, S., Gandrajula, R.P., Haytmyradov, M., Khristenko, V., Merlo, J.-P., Mermerkaya, H., Mestvirishvili, A., Moeller, A., Nachtman, J., Ogul, H., Onel, Y., Ozok, F., Penzo, A., Snyder, C., Tiras, E., Wetzel, J., Yi, K., Anderson, I., Blumenfeld, B., Cocoros, A., Eminizer, N., Fehling, D., Feng, L., Gritsan, A.V., Maksimovic, P., Osherson, M., Roskes, J., Sarica, U., Swartz, M., Xiao, M., Xin, Y., You, C., Al-bataineh, A., Baringer, P., Bean, A., Bruner, C., Castle, J., Kenny, R.P., Kropivnitskaya, A., Majumder, D., Malek, M., Mcbrayer, W., Murray, M., Sanders, S., Stringer, R., Wang, Q., Ivanov, A., Kaadze, K., Khalil, S., Makouski, M., Maravin, Y., Mohammadi, A., Saini, L.K., Skhirtladze, N., Toda, S., Lange, D., Rebassoo, F., Wright, D., Anelli, C., Baden, A., Baron, O., Belloni, A., Calvert, B., Eno, S.C., Ferraioli, C., Gomez, J.A., Hadley, N.J., Jabeen, S., Kellogg, R.G., Kolberg, T., Kunkle, J., Lu, Y., Mignerey, A.C., Shin, Y.H., Skuja, A., Tonjes, M.B., Tonwar, S.C., Apyan, A., Barbieri, R., Baty, A., Bi, R., Bierwagen, K., Brandt, S., Busza, W., Cali, I.A., Demiragli, Z., Di Matteo, L., Gomez Ceballos, G., Goncharov, M., Gulhan, D., Hsu, D., Iiyama, Y., Innocenti, G.M., Klute, M., Kovalskyi, D., Krajczar, K., Lai, Y.S., Lee, Y.-J., Levin, A., Luckey, P.D., Marini, A.C., Mcginn, C., Mironov, C., Narayanan, S., Niu, X., Paus, C., Roland, C., Roland, G., Salfeld-Nebgen, J., Stephans, G.S.F., Sumorok, K., Tatar, K., Varma, M., Velicanu, D., Veverka, J., Wang, J., Wang, T.W., Wyslouch, B., Yang, M., Zhukova, V., Benvenuti, A.C., Dahmes, B., Evans, A., Finkel, A., Gude, A., Hansen, P., Kalafut, S., Kao, S.C., Klapoetke, K., Kubota, Y., Lesko, Z., Mans, J., Nourbakhsh, S., Ruckstuhl, N., Rusack, R., Tambe, N., Turkewitz, J., Acosta, J.G., Oliveros, S., Avdeeva, E., Bartek, R., Bloom, K., Bose, S., Claes, D.R., Dominguez, A., Fangmeier, C., Gonzalez Suarez, R., Kamalieddin, R., Knowlton, D., Kravchenko, I., Meier, F., Monroy, J., Siado, J.E., Snow, G.R., Stieger, B., Alyari, M., Dolen, J., George, J., Godshalk, A., Harrington, C., Iashvili, I., Kaisen, J., Kharchilava, A., Kumar, A., Parker, A., Rappoccio, S., Roozbahani, B., Alverson, G., Barberis, E., Baumgartel, D., Chasco, M., Hortiangtham, A., Massironi, A., Morse, D.M., Nash, D., Orimoto, T., Teixeira De Lima, R., Trocino, D., Wang, R.-J., Wood, D., Bhattacharya, S., Hahn, K.A., Kubik, A., Low, J.F., Mucia, N., Odell, N., Pollack, B., Schmitt, M.H., Sung, K., Trovato, M., Velasco, M., Dev, N., Hildreth, M., Hurtado Anampa, K., Jessop, C., Karmgard, D.J., Kellams, N., Lannon, K., Marinelli, N., Meng, F., Mueller, C., Musienko, Y., Planer, M., Reinsvold, A., Ruchti, R., Rupprecht, N., Smith, G., Taroni, S., Valls, N., Wayne, M., Wolf, M., Woodard, A., Alimena, J., Antonelli, L., Brinson, J., Bylsma, B., Durkin, L.S., Flowers, S., Francis, B., Hart, A., Hill, C., Hughes, R., Ji, W., Liu, B., Luo, W., Puigh, D., Rodenburg, M., Winer, B.L., Wulsin, H.W., Driga, O., Elmer, P., Hardenbrook, J., Hebda, P., Marlow, D., Medvedeva, T., Mooney, M., Olsen, J., Palmer, C., Piroué, P., Stickland, D., Tully, C., Zuranski, A., Malik, S., Barker, A., Barnes, V.E., Benedetti, D., Folgueras, S., Gutay, L., Jha, M.K., Jones, M., Jung, A.W., Jung, K., Miller, D.H., Neumeister, N., Radburn-Smith, B.C., Shi, X., Sun, J., Svyatkovskiy, A., Wang, F., Xie, W., Xu, L., Parashar, N., Stupak, J., Adair, A., Akgun, B., Chen, Z., Ecklund, K.M., Geurts, F.J.M., Guilbaud, M., Li, W., Michlin, B., Northup, M., Padley, B.P., Redjimi, R., Roberts, J., Rorie, J., Tu, Z., Zabel, J., Betchart, B., Bodek, A., de Barbaro, P., Demina, R., Duh, Y.T., Eshaq, Y., Ferbel, T., Galanti, M., Garcia-Bellido, A., Han, J., Hindrichs, O., Khukhunaishvili, A., Lo, K.H., Tan, P., Verzetti, M., Chou, J.P., Contreras-Campana, E., Gershtein, Y., Gómez Espinosa, T.A., Halkiadakis, E., Heindl, M., Hidas, D., Hughes, E., Kaplan, S., Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R., Kyriacou, S., Lath, A., Nash, K., Saka, H., Salur, S., Schnetzer, S., Sheffield, D., Somalwar, S., Stone, R., Thomas, S., Thomassen, P., Walker, M., Foerster, M., Heideman, J., Riley, G., Rose, K., Spanier, S., Thapa, K., Bouhali, O., Castaneda Hernandez, A., Celik, A., Dalchenko, M., De Mattia, M., Delgado, A., Dildick, S., Eusebi, R., Gilmore, J., Huang, T., Juska, E., Kamon, T., Krutelyov, V., Mueller, R., Pakhotin, Y., Patel, R., Perloff, A., Perniè, L., Rathjens, D., Rose, A., Safonov, A., Tatarinov, A., Ulmer, K.A., Akchurin, N., Cowden, C., Damgov, J., Dragoiu, C., Dudero, P.R., Faulkner, J., Kunori, S., Lamichhane, K., Lee, S.W., Libeiro, T., Undleeb, S., Volobouev, I., Wang, Z., Delannoy, A.G., Greene, S., Gurrola, A., Janjam, R., Johns, W., Maguire, C., Melo, A., Ni, H., Sheldon, P., Tuo, S., Velkovska, J., Xu, Q., Arenton, M.W., Barria, P., Cox, B., Goodell, J., Hirosky, R., Ledovskoy, A., Li, H., Neu, C., Sinthuprasith, T., Sun, X., Wang, Y., Wolfe, E., Xia, F., Clarke, C., Harr, R., Karchin, P.E., Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C., Lamichhane, P., Sturdy, J., Belknap, D.A., Dasu, S., Dodd, L., Duric, S., Gomber, B., Grothe, M., Herndon, M., Hervé, A., Klabbers, P., Lanaro, A., Levine, A., Long, K., Loveless, R., Ojalvo, I., Perry, T., Pierro, G.A., Polese, G., Ruggles, T., Savin, A., Sharma, A., Smith, N., Smith, W.H., Taylor, D., Verwilligen, P., Woods, N. 2016 Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics ,
758 pp. 152 – 180 .
6 . The connection between imported intermediate inputs and exports: Evidence from Chinese firms Feng, L., Li, Z., Swenson, D.L. 2016 Journal of International Economics ,
101 pp. 86 – 101 .
7 . Rapid assessment of drug resistance of cancer cells to gefitinib and carboplatin using optical imaging Luo, Z., Samadzadeh, K.M., Nitin, N. 2016 Analytical Biochemistry ,
504 pp. 50 – 58 .
8 . Assessment of orchard N losses to groundwater with a vadose zone monitoring network Baram, S., Couvreur, V., Harter, T., Read, M., Brown, P.H., Hopmans, J.W., Smart, D.R. 2016 Agricultural Water Management ,
172 pp. 83 – 95 .
9 . Effects of human land-use on Africa’s only forest-dependent felid: The African golden cat Caracal aurata Bahaa-el-din, L., Sollmann, R., Hunter, L.T.B., Slotow, R., Macdonald, D.W., Henschel, P. 2016 Biological Conservation ,
199 pp. 1 – 9 .
10 . Hodgkin lymphoma post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: A comparative analysis of clinical characteristics, prognosis, and survival Rosenberg, A.S., Klein, A.K., Ruthazer, R., Evens, A.M. 2016 American Journal of Hematology ,
91 ( 6 ) pp. 560 – 565 .
11 . Asteraceae pollen provisions protect Osmia mason bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) from brood parasitism Spear, D.M., Silverman, S., Forrest, J.R.K. 2016 American Naturalist ,
187 ( 6 ) pp. 797 – 803 .
12 . Resolution of Graves’ disease after renal transplantation Lee, Y., Butani, L., Glaser, N., Nguyen, S. 2016 Pediatric Transplantation ,
20 ( 4 ) pp. 590 – 593 .
13 . Animal behavior case of the month Stelow, L. 2016 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ,
248 ( 11 ) pp. 1248 – 1251 .
14 . Use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter for management of obstructive urolithiasis in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs: 69 cases (2000–2014) Chigerwe, M., Heller, M.C., Balcomb, C.C., Angelos, J.A. 2016 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ,
248 ( 11 ) pp. 1287 – 1290 .
15 . Changes in plasma metabolites and glucose homeostasis during omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome Karakas, S.E., Perroud, B., Kind, T., Palazoglu, M., Fiehn, O. 2016 BBA Clinical ,
5 pp. 179 – 185 .
16 . A synthesis of transplant experiments and ecological niche models suggests that range limits are often niche limits Lee-Yaw, J.A., Kharouba, H.M., Bontrager, M., Mahony, C., Csergo, A.M., Noreen, A.M.E., Li, Q., Schuster, R., Angert, A.L. 2016 Ecology Letters ,
19 ( 6 ) pp. 710 – 722 .
17 . SOME RECENT RESULTS ON ANOSOV REPRESENTATIONS KAPOVICH, M., LEEB, B., PORTI, J. 2016 Transformation Groups ,
pp. 1 – 17 .
Article in Press
18 . Executive summary: Implementing an antibiotic stewardship program: Guidelines by the infectious diseases society of America and the society for healthcare epidemiology of America Barlam, T.F., Cosgrove, S.E., Abbo, L.M., Macdougall, C., Schuetz, A.N., Septimus, E.J., Srinivasan, A., Dellit, T.H., Falck-Ytter, Y.T., Fishman, N.O., Hamilton, C.W., Jenkins, T.C., Lipsett, P.A., Malani, P.N., May, L.S., Moran, G.J., Neuhauser, M.M., Newland, J.G., Ohl, C.A., Samore, M.H., Seo, S.K., Trivedi, K.K. 2016 Clinical Infectious Diseases ,
62 ( 10 ) pp. 1197 – 1202 .
19 . Implementing an antibiotic stewardship program: Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Barlam, T.F., Cosgrove, S.E., Abbo, L.M., Macdougall, C., Schuetz, A.N., Septimus, E.J., Srinivasan, A., Dellit, T.H., Falck-Ytter, Y.T., Fishman, N.O., Hamilton, C.W., Jenkins, T.C., Lipsett, P.A., Malani, P.N., May, L.S., Moran, G.J., Neuhauser, M.M., Newland, J.G., Ohl, C.A., Samore, M.H., Seo, S.K., Trivedi, K.K. 2016 Clinical Infectious Diseases ,
62 ( 10 ) pp. e51 – e77 .
20 . Comparative Physiology of Fatigue Jones, J.H. 2016 Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Article in Press
21 . Determinants of recovery from a 161-km ultramarathon Hoffman, M.D., Badowski, N., Chin, J., Stuempfle, K.J., Parise, C.A. 2016 Journal of Sports Sciences ,
pp. 1 – 9 .
Article in Press
22 . Inter-varietal interactions among plants in genotypically diverse mixtures tend to decrease herbivore performance Grettenberger, I.M., Tooker, J.F. 2016 Oecologia ,
pp. 1 – 14 .
Article in Press
23 . English article usage as a window on the meanings of same, identical and similar 1 FILIPOVIĆ, L., HAWKINS, J.A. 2016 English Language and Linguistics ,
pp. 1 – 19 .
Article in Press
24 . Emerging Endovascular Therapies for Non-Compressible Torso Hemorrhage Russo, R., Neff, L.P., Johnson, M.A., Williams, T.K. 2016 Shock
Article in Press
25 . Wildfire and forest disease interaction lead to greater loss of soil nutrients and carbon Cobb, R.C., Meentemeyer, R.K., Rizzo, D.M. 2016 Oecologia ,
pp. 1 – 12 .
Article in Press
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Altmetric launch Badges for Books – new chapter-level insights for thousands of scholarly books
Launching on Routledge Handbooks Online, Altmetric Badges for Books enables publishers to provide an at-a-glance summary of the online attention a published book and its individual chapters have received. Now available on content that is identified by ISBN (International Standard Book Number), the distinctive Altmetric donut badges and associated details page provide authors, editors and readers with a real-time record of mentions from mainstream media, public policy documents, online reference managers, blogs, social media, and post-publication peer review platforms.
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Emerald invited to take part in Kudos/ScholarOne pilot
Academic publisher Emerald Group Publishing has announced that it is one of a select number of publishers to have been invited to take part in the pilot of a new partnership between Kudos and Thomson Reuters’ ScholarOne. Kudos is an online service – free for Emerald authors to use – that helps researchers and their institutions and funders maximise the visibility and impact of their published articles.
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Dr. Thomas Faulkenberry named associate editor for the Journal of Psychological Inquiry
Dr. Thomas Faulkenberry, assistant professor of psychology at Tarleton State University, has been appointed Associate Editor for the Journal of Psychological Inquiry (JPI), devoted to highlighting undergraduate research in psychology. JPI is one of the few journals to accept contributions from undergraduate students, including scholarly work that encompasses a broad range of investigation, literature reviews and historical articles covering any topical area in the psychological sciences.
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RCUK seeks members for its new Open Access Practitioners Group
Research Councils UK (RCUK) is seeking members for its new Open Access Practitioners Group to share best practice, discuss issues and provide sector insight to improve the implementation of the RCUK Policy on Open Access. The group is being established in response to a recommendation in Professor Sir Bob Burgess’ independent review of the implementation of the RCUK Policy on Open Access, published in March 2015 after the first year of the policy’s introduction.
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American Psychological Association appoints Brenda Carter as publisher, APA Books
The American Psychological Association has announced the appointment of Brenda Carter as publisher, APA Books. The APA Books publishing program meets the needs of scholars, clinicians, researchers and students in all areas of psychology and related fields with more than 900 active titles, including the ‘Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association®,’ the official guide to APA Style®.
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Jeremy Berg named editor-in-chief of Science
Jeremy Berg, a biochemist and administrator at the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) in Pennsylvania, will become the next editor-in-chief of Science magazine, effective July 1. A former director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) who has a longstanding interest in science policy, Berg will succeed Marcia McNutt, who is stepping down to become president of the National Academy of Sciences. The announcement was made by the board of AAAS, which publishes Science.
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Consortium of Academic and Special Libraries of Saskatchewan selects Ex Libris Alma and Primo solutions
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that the Consortium of Academic and Special Libraries of Saskatchewan (CASLS) has selected the Ex Libris Alma® resource management service and Primo® discovery and delivery solution to create a unified resource management and discovery environment that offers comprehensive and convenient access to library materials. Alma and Primo will replace Voyager and SirsiDynix Symphony.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Google, FCA Begin Work On Autonomous Minivans In Detroit Suburbs.

The Wall Street Journal  (5/25, Bennett, Subscription Publication) reports that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) and Google have started working on autonomous driving technology to begin testing in Pacifica minivans and are preparing to launch an engineering and development center in Michigan, according to Google autonomous vehicle head John Krafcik. The move is part of a recent deal struck between the two companies to collaborate on a limited number of autonomous minivans. The AP  (5/25) reports that on Wednesday, Google said it will open a 53,000-square-foot “self-driving technology development center” in Novi, Michigan. Bloomberg News  (5/25, Clark) notes that Google posted in a blog that the facility’s location “will help us collaborate more easily and access Michigan’s top talent in vehicle development and engineering.” The blog post adds that at the facility Google “engineers, working with local partners, will further develop and refine self-driving technology.” According to Mashable  (5/25, Jaynes), the choice of location “likely indicates it is interested in partnering with hometown carmakers Ford and GM as well.” Google hopes to complete “at least a few of the 100 autonomous minivans” by the end of 2016. Sources offering similar coverage include the Detroit (MI) Free Press  (5/25, Snavely), Reuters  (5/25, White), and USA Today  (5/25).

Higher Education

NSF Grant To Fund STEM Scholarship Program At Austin College.

The Sherman (TX) Herald Democrat  (5/25) reports that the National Science Foundation has given Austin College in Sherman, Texas a $650,000 grant to give “bright students, who might not be able to afford secondary education, the opportunity to go to college and earn a degree in science.” The grant will fund a series of STEM scholarships. KTEN-TV  Sherman, TX (5/25) also covers this story.

DC AG Sues Student Aid Center For Misleading Student Borrowers.

The Washington Post  (5/25, Douglas-Gabriel) reports Washington, DC District Attorney General Karl A. Racine has filed suit against Student Aid Center, “a Florida-based debt-relief company, and its owners for misleading area residents about the firm’s ability to lower student-loan payments and illegally charging upfront fees before providing the service.” Racine’s office said the company charges up to $1,000 “in exchange for simply mailing out paperwork that borrowers can obtain and submit for free through the federal government.” Moreover, “telemarketers implied or told [consumers] Student Aid Center was affiliated with the Education Department, a relationship that could help fast-track applications for loan forgiveness or lower monthly payments.”

Military Groups Call On Senate To Kill Language Giving For-Profits Access To Military Bases.

The Hill  (5/25, Kheel) reports that a coalition of 20 military and veterans groups have signed a letter calling on the Senate “to rid its defense policy bill of language they say would allow predatory for-profit colleges unfettered access to military installations.” The letter says “the language undermines the Pentagon’s current process of using a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to decide which educational institutions to allow onto bases.”

Kode With Klossy Expanding To Offer Postsecondary Scholarships.

USA Today  (5/25, Tulp) reports that Kode with Klossy, the coding instruction initiative for girls launched by fashion model Karlie Kloss, is “now offering young women 18+ the Kode with Klossy Career Scholarship, aimed at young women who want to jump-start their careers in code.” The program “aims to give women the opportunity to learn coding languages, build a robust code portfolio on GitHub, and experience building Web apps — both independently and with others in the program.” The program has a number of corporate partners that will offer successful participants apprenticeships.

From ASEE
EDITOR NEEDED: Journal of Engineering Education
ASEE members recognize JEE as the world’s premier journal on the scholarship of engineering and engineering technology education. Read more if you’d like to be considered as the next editor.
Retention Strategies
Going the Distance” is a video showcasing effective retention strategies at six universities.

ASEE has done extensive work on retention and time-to-graduation rates over the previous several years. A good distillation was recently done by consultant Cindy Veenstra.

Research and Development

Researchers, Legal Experts Debate Implications Of AI Advancements.

The New York Times  (5/25, Markoff, Subscription Publication) reports that the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy sponsored a discussion on Tuesday in Seattle, at which “legal specialists and technologists explored questions about autonomous systems that would increasingly make decisions without human input in areas like warfare, transportation and health.” Despite this increased concern about regulating AI systems, researchers say they are “still far from matching the flexibility and learning capability of the human mind.”

Researcher Discusses What Technologies The iPhone Of The Future May Hold.

TechRadar  (5/25, Marshall) spoke with Dr Kevin Curran, Ulster University Reader in Computer Science and IEEE Technical Expert and Royal Academy of Engineering/Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellow about what the iPhone could be like in 2020. Among his thoughts were that a felxible display for the phone could be possible and he said “other promising materials such as graphene could revolutionise design due to its incredible strength, lightness and slimness. We should also see more ultra thin, ultra-bendable glass such as Corning Willow.” Curran also believes improved transflective displays will be available, and that the iPhone will be the center of an ecosystem that includes a smartwatch and car-based displays.

Workforce

For First Time Ever, Clean-Energy Jobs Overtake Those In Oil, Natural Gas Extraction.

Bloomberg News  (5/25, Hirtenstein) reports that “the number of US jobs in solar energy overtook those in oil and natural gas extraction for the first time last year, helping drive a global surge in employment in the clean-energy business as fossil-fuel companies faltered.” According to an International Renewable Energy Agency report, “employment in the US solar business grew 12 times faster than overall job creation.”

Industry News

Apple Rumored To Be Exploring EV Charging Technology.

Reuters  (5/25, Love, Sage) reports in an exclusive that Apple is exploring EV charging technology, talking with companies that own charging stations and hiring engineers with competence in the area, though its unnamed sources did not specifically say the company was interested in EV charging. However, evidence from earlier reports points to EVs, according to Reuters, though it remains unclear whether the company would pursue universal or proprietary charging technology. Tech Insider  (5/25, Thompson) adds that “the iPhone maker has recruited several experts in the field” and has reportedly initiated discussions with “several companies already in the business of building charging stations.” Citing the Reuters piece, Tech Insider adds that the company has “hired at least four charging experts from various backgrounds,” including former Google engineer Kurt Adelberger – who “co-authored a patent prior to leaving Google for a smart charging system.”

The Road and Track  (5/25) contributor Bob Sorokanich laments the distinct possibility that Apple will choose proprietary technology, further complicating the electric car charging world. Though he admits that the report is only “a hunch,” Sorokanich argues that “it’s not hard to imagine a future in which a (hypothetical) first-generation Apple electric car uses one type of Apple-designed plug” that will be “replaced by a different proprietary plug on the second-generation car.” Jalopnik’s  (5/25) Raphael Orlove offers similar commentary.

Ford: Detroit Can Become America’s “Mobility Central.”

The Detroit Free Press  (5/25, Snavely) reports that Ford executive chairman Bill Ford said in an speech that Detroit could become the center of American mobility, citing “more engineers…than any other state,” “a huge customer base here with (automakers) and tier one suppliers.”

Engineering and Public Policy

House Advances Toward Conference On Energy Bill.

The Hill  (5/25, Cama) reports the House on Wednesday voted to pass an amended version of the Senate’s energy bill, forming a conference committee. The House attached to it “numerous other, mostly Republican, energy and natural resources bills, including legislation to bring drought relief to California.” Democrats “said the measure was backward looking and had little to do with modernization” and that the drought provisions “would do far more harm than good.”

House Votes To Bar Future Purchases Of Heavy Water From Iran.

The AP  (5/25, Taylor) reports, “The House has voted to bar the US government from future purchases of heavy water from Iran, undercutting the controversial nuclear pact with that nation and earning a certain veto threat on a key government funding bill” covering the Energy Department. Last month, the Administration completed an $8.6 million purchase of Iranian heavy water.

White House Proposes Requiring Contractors To Disclose Climate Impacts.

The Wall Street Journal  (5/25, Harder, Olson, Subscription Publication) reported yesterday morning that the White House would propose a new rule Wednesday that would push federal contractors to publicly disclose more information about their impact on climate change. The rule is expected to be finalized this fall and would affect an estimated 90 percent of all federal contracts. The Hill  (5/25, Henry) reports that Chief Acquisition Officer Anne Rung and two other officials wrote in an Administration blog post that the rule means “we’ll be able to better assess supplier greenhouse gas management practices, manage direct and indirect greenhouse gas emission, address climate risk in the federal government’s supply chain and engage with contractors to reduce supply chain emissions.”

PG&E Accuses Prosecutors Of Improper Evidence Collection In San Bruno Blast Probe.

The San Francisco Chronicle  (5/25, Egelko) reports, Pacific Gas and Electric “is accusing federal prosecutors of lying and concealing evidence showing that federal investigators were also part of a state probe of the blast that gave them direct access to the utility’s records.” PG&E said, as many as four expert consultants for the prosecution also served as consultants to the California PUC. PG&E said the consultants gave prosecutors “access to PG&E personnel, records, facilities” and other evidence without having to go to court. PG&E lawyers said the judge would be “well within (his) discretion to dismiss this case or any counts outright for the systematic misconduct and deceitful behavior” they described.

Cheap Wind, Natural Gas-fired Power Squeezes Illinois Coal, Nuclear Plants.

In an analysis, Bloomberg News  (5/25, Chediak) reports Illinois offers a “snapshot of the woes of the US coal and nuclear industries” following a four-year drop in electricity demand and fourfold increase in cheap wind from neighboring states that has prompted the closure of 10 percent of generating capacity in the state. Exelon and Dynegy “are asking lawmakers to bail out their money-losing assets to prevent further job-cutting.” Morningstar utility analyst Travis Miller explained, “You’ve got free wind power coming from the west and cheap gas coming from the east and that’s not a good place to be for coal and nuclear power plants.”

Millions Spent On Both Sides Of Nevada Rooftop Solar Referendum.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal  (5/25, Whaley) reports that campaign contributions to Nevada state lawmakers have been made by SolarCity and NV Energy and millions more spent by the two “on an initiative referendum sought by the rooftop solar company to ask voters in November to restore Nevada’s more favorable net metering rates.” The spending “suggest the issue will see another hard fought battle in the 2017 Legislature.” Between January 1 and May 20, SolarCity has contributed nearly $70,000 to 15 incumbent legislators, while NV Energy donated more than $200,000 to 43 legislative incumbents and candidates.

Elementary/Secondary Education

Middle School Students Build Underwater Remote Operated Vehicles.

The Hickory (NC) Daily Record  (5/26) reports students at Newton-Conover Middle School have “learned to see any problem as an opportunity to succeed after spending the last few weeks building two SeaPerch Underwater Remote Operated Vehicles.” As part of a STEM project at the school, the students demonstrated their ROVs at the Shuford YMCA pool Wednesday in front of to teachers and administrators. Charles Draper, the teacher of the school’s Exception Children class, said the program has “allowed them to use math, science, technology, engineering in the classroom in a practical way and to use those skills to build a final product.”

Minnesota Students Create Prosthetic Hand For Younger Girl.

The AP  (5/25) reports on two students at Shattuck-St. Mary’s High School in Faribault, Minnesota who plan to spend their final two years of engineering classes designing a prosthetic hand for a local 14-year-old girl. Shattuck-St. Mary’s teacher Mike Boone, will supervise the students.

Mishawaka High Uses Grant For Technology In The Classroom.

The AP  (5/25) reports that “state law allows for the capturing of property tax dollars in certain areas designated as TIFs,” and “Based on the number of students in P-H-M schools who are Mishawaka residents, the city gave that school system about $125,000 in TIF money for Project Lead the Way.” South Bend schools received about $542,000 to be paid out over three years for computers, software and supplies for STEM-based programs in the city schools, South Bend Community Schools spokeswoman Sue Coney said Monday. Ben Modlin, Project Lead the Way teacher at MHS, said “the mission is to get students career ready. He said the biomedical program received about $127,000 and engineering received approximately $210,000.”

Also in the News

Regeneron Says It Will Sponsor Iconic Science Talent Search.

The New York Times  (5/26, Hardy, Subscription Publication) reports that Regeneron Pharmaceuticals plans to be the new sponsor of the nationwide Science Talent Search, an iconic contest that “counts among its finalists several Nobel Prize winners, as well as university professors, popular science authors and business executives.” Regeneron is taking over from Intel and said it would devote $100 million to the competition over 10 years. The Times says the contest sponsorship “increasingly reflects the state of American business as it relates to education in so-called STEM subjects, or science, technology, engineering and mathematics.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

Texas A&M, UT, UNM Announce Joint Bid For Sandia Lab Contract.
Finnish Company Donates Ship Engine To Texas A&M Galveston.
Bill Nye Observes Successful LightSail Spacecraft Test At Cal Poly.
VW “On Track” In US Civil Suit.
PennDOT May Reopen Road Closed Since April 29 Gas Pipeline Explosion.
Baltimore Elementary School MakerLab Inspires Creativity, Ingenuity.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Society for Scholarly Publishing to host six pre-meeting seminars ahead of 2016 Annual Meeting
The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) will host six pre-meeting seminars on June 1 in Vancouver, ahead of the 2016 Annual Meeting. The seminars will be split between a morning session, 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., and an afternoon session, 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., allowing attendees to participate in two seminars prior to the opening plenary.
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Elsevier launches OA journal focusing on clinical practice and education in clinical neurophysiology
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the launch of Clinical Neurophysiology Practice, an open access journal that focuses on clinical practice issues in clinical neurophysiology. The journal will cover latest research, case reports, clinical series, normal values and didactic reviews. It is an official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology and complements Clinical Neurophysiology.
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EBSCO Information Services releases Bibliography of Asian Studies via EBSCOhost
The Bibliography of Asian StudiesTM (BAS), an authoritative resource for research and scholarly literature on East, Southeast and South Asia, is now available from EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO). The resource is accessible via the EBSCOhost® platform and contains nearly 900,000 records for articles published worldwide from 1971 to the present.
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New IEEE 802.19 study group focuses on automotive environment and use cases for wireless coexistence
Technical professional organisation IEEE has established IEEE 802.19TM Wireless Coexistence Working Group, a study group on ‘Wireless Automotive Coexistence.’ This group will study the applicability of current standards to address the aforementioned issues and may suggest enhancements that could provide guidance to new standards.
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Healio.com to launch ‘In the Journals Plus’ at 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Healio.com will introduce ‘In the Journals Plus’ at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, June 3-7 in Chicago. ‘In the Journals Plus’ provides busy physicians with summaries of the top articles from leading journals and includes physician perspectives for further practical insight.
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Cengage Learning and Microsoft announce integration of Microsoft Office into MindTap
Cengage Learning and Microsoft have announced the integration of Microsoft Office into Cengage Learning’s flagship MindTap platform. Beginning with business statistics and computing—courses that prepare students for jobs that rely heavily on the use of business software—this relationship is the first-of-its-kind to provide students with live access to Office directly within their learning platform.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Texas A&M, UT, UNM Announce Joint Bid For Sandia Lab Contract.

The Houston Chronicle  (5/24, Wermund) reports the Texas A&M University, the University of Texas systems, and the University of New Mexico announced on Tuesday they would join Boeing and Battelle in a bid for the management contract for Sandia National Laboratories. “The universities would conduct research, provide workforce training and independent peer review of the work done at Sandia.” A&M Chancellor John Sharp said during the announcement, “I believe we bring an academic prowess that no one in this country can match.”

The Albuquerque (NM) Journal  (5/24, Robinson-Avila) quotes UNM President Robert Frank saying, “Sandia is a great lab, but as it now functions, it’s not as New Mexico-centric as it could be.” The Journal reports Frank “said the partnership could bring a lot more jobs and economic development opportunities to New Mexico” and if they win the contract, “they will prioritize work with locally-based companies and institutions in their bid to operate the lab.”

Providing similar coverage, the Texas Tribune  (5/24, Watkins), the Bryan College Station (TX) Eagle  (5/24, Kuhlmann), Albuquerque (NM) Business First  (5/24, Cardillo), Renewable Energy World  (5/24), Defense Daily  (5/24, Tabirian), KENS-TV  San Antonio (5/24), KRQE-TV  Albuquerque, NM (5/24), and KHOU-TV  Houston (5/24) also report.

Higher Education

Finnish Company Donates Ship Engine To Texas A&M Galveston.

The Houston Chronicle  (5/24, Rice) reports that “Wartsila, a $5.3 billion Helsinki-based company specializing in building marine engines and generators, oil and gas equipment, and conventional solar power plants,” has “donated a $500,000 ship engine to the Maritime Academy at Texas A&M University Galveston.” The Chronicle says “the 27-ton engine, the size of a school bus, will be used to teach students engine repair and about emissions and fuel economy as they work to obtain maritime licenses that will allow them to operate ships in oceans around the world.”

The Gilmer (TX) Mirror  (5/24) has a similar report.

Many College Payment-Assistance Programs Fail To Help Low-Income Students.

The Atlantic  (5/24, Marcus) reports that “some government, university, and private programs to help Americans pay for college have become more likely to benefit wealthier students than even the most academically talented lower-income ones.” The Atlantic says assistance is flowing to wealthier families “at a time when a new report from the University of Pennsylvania shows the proportion of wealthier students earning degrees continues to rise, while the proportion of lower-income degree recipients is falling.” Meanwhile, “proposals to reform these programs have had scant success.” The Atlantic says the Obama Administration includes a proposal in its 2017 budget that would let students use Pell grants “living expenses first and tuition second, nearly doubling the proportion who would become eligible for…tuition tax breaks from 44 percent now to 82 percent, according to calculations by New America.” But, “the Obama budget has already been rejected by Republicans.”

“Pay-to-stay” Sting Operation Involving Sham College Leads To 21 Indictments.

Inside Higher Ed  (5/24, Redden) reports that Jun Shen, “a Chinese national and U.S. permanent resident who owned an international student consulting company,” recruited approximately 150 foreign individuals to attend the University of Northern New Jersey despite knowing that they would not be attending classes “before federal prosecutors announced that UNNJ was a fake university set up by the government as part of an elaborate sting operation.” Insider Higher ED explains that “Federal officials allege that foreign nationals, with the help of recruiters like Shen, paid to enroll in the sham UNNJ as a way to maintain their status to live and work in the U.S. on student visas, though they weren’t genuine students at all.” The report says the operation resulted “in the indictment of 21 people, including Shen, on visa fraud-related charges, renewed focus on the problem of fake colleges, but its real target was the brokers, or agents, it ensnared.”

US Colleges Seeing Reduced Number Of Foreign Students.

The Wall Street Journal  (5/24, Korn, Omran, Subscription Publication) reports Eastern Washington University’s foreign student enrollment fell sharply in recent months, mainly due to a plummet in Saudi Arabian students funded by government scholarships. The school is one of many nationwide that had gone after Saudi and Brazilian students and now face a slew of business challenges tied to foreign-currency fluctuations and downward economic movements in both countries. Schools also face upcoming universities in foreign students’ home nations. Rahul Choudaha, CEO at DrEducation, a higher education research and consulting firm, said that schools that have relied on a small number of countries now must begin anew in alternative nations like Vietnam, Mexico, and Jordan, where competition is already fierce.

From ASEE
SPECIAL SECTION: Prism Magazine on Whistleblowing
ASEE’s Prism magazine features engineering educators using their expertise to challenge authority when needed.

Retention Strategies
Going the Distance” is a video showcasing effective retention strategies at six universities.

Research and Development

Bill Nye Observes Successful LightSail Spacecraft Test At Cal Poly.

The San Luis Obispo (CA) Tribune  (5/23, Wilson) reports that Bill Nye, the educator and TV personality known as “the Science Guy,” visited Cal Poly on Monday “to monitor a successful test of a craft’s solar panel and antenna deployment at the university’s Advanced Technology Laboratories.” The Tribune explains that the $5.45 million citizen-funded LightSail project is team effort involving Cal Poly and the Georgia Institute of Technology that “has been coordinated by the Planetary Society, a nongovernmental, nonprofit organization that promotes the exploration of space.” The report explains that Nye is the society’s chief executive director.

KSBY-TV  San Luis Obispo, CA (5/24) has a similar report.

Rochester Institute Of Technology Wins Grant For Mobile App Tailored To Deaf Students.

WROC-TV  Rochester, NY (5/24) reports on its website that Rep. Louise Slaughter has announced “that the National Science Foundation has awarded an $820,504 grant to the Rochester Institute of Technology to develop a new curriculum for mobile app development.” WROC says “the 5-course curriculum is being developed and initially offered at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.” The report explains that “the award will be used to develop a new mobile app curriculum that will be appropriate for all students, with teaching techniques tailored to the needs of deaf and hard-of-hearing students at NTID.”

UC-Boulder To Create Region’s First Federal Research Data Center.

The Denver Business Journal  (5/24, Hendee, Subscription Publication) reports that “the University of Colorado-Boulder will join 19 other universities across the nation as a federal data research hub.” The Journal explains that “CU-Boulder will create the Rocky Mountain region’s first research data center, housed at the Institute of Behavioral Science using a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.” CU-Boulder says “researchers from the center will do U.S. Census research and projects that ‘advance scientific knowledge and simultaneously deliver tangible benefits to the federal statistical system.’”

Boeing, SpaceX Making Progress Toward Test Launches With Astronauts In The Near Future.

Florida Today  (5/24, Dean) reports Boeing and SpaceX are progressing in their efforts “toward launches of astronauts on test flights in late 2017 or early 2018 that aim to end U.S. reliance on Russia for rides to orbit.” Boeing recently joined the clamshell halves of a prototype CST-100 Starliner crew capsule being assembled at Kennedy Space Center, “where SpaceX continues to renovate a launch pad for launches of astronauts in Dragon capsules.” SpaceX’s upcoming milestones include “key engineering reviews of the Crew Dragon’s design and of its modifications to KSC’s pad 39A, a former Saturn V and space shuttle pad where a new access arm and ‘white room’ will be installed to lead astronauts to their capsules.”

Industry News

VW “On Track” In US Civil Suit.

The AP  (5/24, Thanawala) reports US District Court Judge Charles Breyer found that Volkswagen and the attorneys for VW vehicle owners “have made substantial progress in reach a deal,” which is due to the court by June 21. The AP notes that last month Breyer announced a tentative deal between the parties that gives the owners of nearly 500,000 2-liter, four-cylinder diesel engine cars “the option of having Volkswagen buy back or repair their vehicles.” The AP also notes that VW is working on “engineering studies and testing” for 90,000 3-liter, six-cylinder engine vehicles, and adds that the tentative settlement does “not cover potential fines and penalties.”

The AFP  (5/24) reports that VW is “on track to meet the court deadline” to reach an agreement “with the government and car owners.”

Reuters  (5/24, Sage, Shepardson) reports that the parties to the agreement are VW owners, the US Justice Department, the EPA, the FTC, and the state of California. Reuters adds that big questions still remain about the total amount of fines VW will pay and notes that the settlement will also include an fund for environmental remediation and money to promote energy efficient automotive technology.

Reuters  (5/24) also reports that VW does not think it will need to add to the 16.2 billion euros ($18.1 billion) it has already set aside for dealing with fallout from its emissions scandal. Reuters quotes a source saying the company knows “the sum we are facing as of today.”

However, Bloomberg News  (5/25, Hytha) reports that VW claimed the penalties the government is seeking “are excessive” in a court filing shortly after Judge Breyer’s comments. Bloomberg notes the “deal to resolve civil claims” is likely “worth around $10 billion.”

The Financial Times  (5/24, McGee, Subscription Publication) reports that the final agreement will not be approved until the public is given the chance to respond.

Engineering and Public Policy

PennDOT May Reopen Road Closed Since April 29 Gas Pipeline Explosion.

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review  (5/24, Erdley, Tierney) reports PennDOT announced Tuesday state Route 819 in Salem Township will “reopen as early as Friday or Saturday.” The road was closed April 29 due to an explosion of a Spectra energy pipeline. The explosion “left one man with extensive burns” and “seared about 40 acres of pasture and cropland,” also “destroying one home and damaging several others.” The cause is under investigation by Spectra, “third-party scientists, engineers,” and the US Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. It resulted in “a 24 1⁄2-foot section of 30-inch pipeline buried in the right of way flying 100 feet as a fireball soared hundreds of feet.” Spectra spokesman Creighton Welch said the company employed a contractor to resurface “2,100 feet of Route 819.” It must be approved by PennDOT before the road can be reopened.

The AP  (5/24) also reports on the story.

McCrory Threatens To Veto Coal Ash Panel Bill.

The AP  (5/24, Robertson) reports that North Carolina state lawmakers moved forward Tuesday with a plan to reconstitute the Coal Ash Management Commission which was shuttered by Gov. Pat McCrory “after the state Supreme Court ruled in January that lawmakers had too much control over the panel’s work.” McCrory “threatened to veto the bill if the entire General Assembly passes it in its current form,” while general counsel Bob Stephens argued that the plan is still unconstitutional. Duke Energy supports the measure, according to spokeswoman Paige Sheehan, as it has wanted to leave ash in place at most of the pits.

California PUC Draws Criticism After Emails Show PG&E, Wall Street Interactions.

The San Jose (CA) Mercury News  (5/24, Avalos) reports that the group Consumer Watchdog said Tuesday a batch of 100,000 emails it has released from California regulators has raised fresh questions about the integrity of the Public Utilities Commission and its oversight. The emails disclose meetings and discussions among top PUC officials and executives in the power industry and financial sector. PUC spokeswoman Terrie Prosper said of the interactions, “A clear understanding of California’s policy goals helps investors to better understand the utility and our policies that the utilities must follow,” adding, “This knowledge leads to investors charging utilities less, which leads to consumers paying less.”

Missouri City Seeks To Decrease Solar Energy Cost In New Program.

The AP  (5/24) reports Columbia, Missouri is slated “to become one of the first communities in the country to join a program seeking to decrease the cost of soaking up solar energy.” SolSmart will assist community “in reducing costs associated with installing solar panels.” The program, which is run by The Solar Foundation, “is a $13 million investment by the Department of Energy.” Columbia started consideration of “being involved with the program in November when City Council member Ian Thomas attended a solar energy acceleration workshop at the National League of Cities conference in Nashville, Tennessee.”

Duke Energy Strikes Second Deal To Capture Pig Farm Methane.

The Charlotte (NC) Observer  (5/24, Henderson) reports Duke Energy has signed a second deal to turn swine waste from farms in North Carolina’s Duplin County into electricity. “The project will capture methane gas from the waste and inject it into natural gas pipelines that serve power plants in Wayne and New Hanover counties” and is expected to start operating by mid-2017. Duke’s strategy is to capture methane from pig farms and pipe it to a central site where it is cleaned and then sent into natural gas pipelines.

The AP  (5/24) also reports.

Elementary/Secondary Education

Baltimore Elementary School MakerLab Inspires Creativity, Ingenuity.

The Baltimore Sun  (5/25) reports when a Baltimore County’s Hillcrest Elementary School no longer had a MakerLab, fifth-grade teacher Peggy Koenig came up with the idea to turn the once computer lab into a “hub for imagination – without screens.” According to the Baltimore Sun, students now stand at tables and create projects from recycled materials, an activity that promotes critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration.

Eleven Programs Receive To Honors In Career Technical Education.

Education Week  (5/24, Gewertz) reports on 11 schools that on Tuesday were recognized by Advance CTE, the organization of state directors of career and technical education, for “outstanding career and technical education programs.” At these schools, students learned dairy farming, building parts for jetliners, architecture, early-childhood development, and pre-school teachers.

Oregon District Resolution On Climate Change Textbooks Ignites “A Firestorm.”

The Los Angeles Times  (5/24, Resmovits) examines how the Portland (Oregon) Public School Board ‘s May 17 resolution to “abandon the use of any adopted text material that is found to express doubt about the severity of the climate crisis or its root in human activities” has taken on “a life of its own” outside of the city, with websites denouncing the districts move and claiming the district would “remove all books that weren’t up to snuff.” The Times states the resolution has “turned into something much more politicized,” showing “how touchy it can be to try to regulate how schools teach about an emerging field.”

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

Study: Burning Of All Fossil Fuels Would Result In “More Profound Climate Changes.”
Asian-American Groups Seek ED Probe Of Ivy League Admissions.
Scientist Argues For Ground-Based Search For Killer Asteroids.
Manufacturing Apprenticeships Increasingly Open To Women.
Scotland On Its Way To Wind Energy “World Leader” With $4 Billion Wind Farm.
Frac Sand Mining Said To Be Harming Midwest Farming Communities.
STEM Makes A Difference In Early Learning.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

IEEE Standards in interactive HTML format now available in IEEE Xplore
IEEE Xplore digital library subscribers will now gain access to over 1,000 IEEE standards in HTML format, for a more engaging and interactive reading experience. IEEE is one of the first publishers to make its extensive collection of technical standards documents available in interactive HTML, the latest in a series of updates to continually enhance and improve the IEEE Xplore user experience.
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Wiley selects Mapi as exclusive Linguistic Validation provider for Clinical Outcome Assessments
Mapi, the original developer of Linguistic Validation and a trusted provider of medical translation, was selected as the exclusive translator of John Wiley & Sons (Wiley) published Clinical Outcome Assessments (COAs). Wiley is a global provider of knowledge and knowledge-enabled services that improve outcomes in areas of research, professional practice and education.
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ORCID identifiers now live in Research Councils’ grants system (Je-S)
Researchers can now create or connect their ORCID identifier (ORCID iD) in the Research Councils’ grants system (Je-S) by logging in to their personal information page. This is seen to be an important first step towards improving the flow of research information across the higher education sector.
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International Association of Online Engineering and the Joint Implant Surgery & Research Foundation to preserve e-journals with Portico
Digital preservation specialist Portico has announced that the International Association of Online Engineering (IAOE) and the Joint Implant Surgery & Research Foundation (JIRSF) will preserve e-journals with Portico, ensuring that they will be secure and available into the future. JIRSF will partner with Portico to preserve the content from its journal—Reconstructive Review.
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Kudos announces society pilot with Wiley, Taylor & Francis, the American Society for Microbiology and the European Society of Cardiology
Kudos, a service for maximizing the reach and impact of research publications, has commenced a society pilot designed to develop tools and services to help societies support member outreach and identify membership growth opportunities. The pilot is being undertaken with Wiley, Taylor & Francis Group, the American Society for Microbiology and the European Society of Cardiology.
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Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research announces collaborative partnership with the International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, the peer-reviewed open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, has announced a new collaborative partnership with the International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines. This new collaboration promotes the missions of the Journal and Association to further the science of clinical cannabis, cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoid system, for potential therapeutic and medical application.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Study: Burning Of All Fossil Fuels Would Result In “More Profound Climate Changes.”

A study released Monday says that if all the fossil fuel on the planet was burned “the world could heat up by as much as 18 degrees in the next three centuries,” USA Today  (5/23, Rice) reports. Researchers called the finding “a critical warning message on global warming,” with one expert noting this would be “as warm as when dinosaurs roamed the Earth about 65 million years ago.” According to the study, which appeared in the peer-reviewed British journal Nature Climate Change, “The unregulated exploitation of the fossil fuel resource could ultimately result in considerably more profound climate changes than previously suggested.” Although this is “an extreme scenario, such warmth would render some parts of the world uninhabitable and damage the planet’s economy, human health and food supply, the study said.”

Virgin Islands AG Withdraws Subpoena Of CEI In Climate Change Probe. The Washington Times  (5/23, Richardson) reports that amid “criticism over his investigation into climate-change dissenters,” Virgin Islands Attorney General Claude E. Walker “has withdrawn his subpoena of the Competitive Enterprise Institute.” CEI general counsel Sam Kazman said Monday that his organization “would still push the court for sanctions against Mr. Walker, one of an 17-member coalition of attorneys general pursuing fraud allegations against climate skeptics.” Walker “has also issued a subpoena to ExxonMobil for its documents and communications related to climate change with more than 100 universities, researchers and free-market think-tanks, including CEI.”

Exxon Investors To Vote On Resolution Over Climate Change. The New York Times  (5/23, A1, Krauss, Schwartz, Subscription Publication) reports on its front page that Exxon shareholders will vote Wednesday at the company’s annual meeting “on a resolution to prod Exxon Mobil to disclose the risks of climate change to its business.” While similar resolutions have failed in recent years, “there is a growing chorus of investors, many of them large institutional shareholders,” who worry “that the optimism of Exxon Mobil’s outlook for oil demand is dangerously misguided.” For instance, Exxon projects the global demand of oil will grow to 109 million barrels of oil per day by 2040, but the International Energy Agency’s projections “include one scenario where demand could drop by 22 percent by 2040.”

Higher Education

Asian-American Groups Seek ED Probe Of Ivy League Admissions.

The Wall Street Journal  (5/23, Belkin, Subscription Publication) reports that a group of Asian-American organizations on Monday asked the ED to investigate Brown University, Dartmouth College, and Yale University, alleging that the schools discriminate against Asian-American students in their admissions processes. Although the population of college-age Asian Americans has doubled in 20 years and the number of qualified Asian-American students has increased significantly, the percentage accepted at most Ivy League schools is flat, due to “racial quotas and caps, maintained by racially differentiated standards for admissions that severely burden Asian-American applicants,” the lawsuit alleges.

NBC News  (5/23) reports that the 132 groups, led by the Asian American Coalition for Education, accuse the schools “of denying admission to Asian-American students with near-perfect SAT scores and GPAs in the top one percent while accepting applicants of other races with similar accolades.” The coalition filed a similar complaint with ED last year, the article adds, noting that ED “closed that complaint in June because of an on-going lawsuit filed in November 2014 by Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. that makes the same accusations.”

Inside Higher Ed  (5/23), the Politico  (5/23) “Morning Education” blog, and NewBostonPost (MA)  (5/23) also cover this story.

Colleges, Students Making Wait-List Decisions.

The Washington Post  (5/23, Anderson) reports on the end this month of “wait-list limbo” for many prospective college students who were placed on college admissions wait-lists earlier this spring, noting that leading schools “often offer thousands of applicants a place on their wait lists but wind up admitting relatively few — or even none — of them.” In May, “admitted students have a deadline of May 1 to choose where they want to enroll and place a deposit to secure a seat. Meanwhile, colleges are sifting through their wait lists for qualified candidates.”

DeVry, Apollo Ending Use Of Forced Arbitration Clauses.

The Washington Post  (5/23, Douglas-Gabriel) reports that the parent companies of DeVry University and the University of Phoenix “will no longer bar students from filing class-action lawsuits or otherwise taking their grievances to the courts,” noting that both firms are ending the use of “mandatory arbitration clauses that consumer advocates say rob students of their rights.” The piece says that for-profit college firms “have come under fire for tucking arbitration clauses into their enrollment contracts to protect their financial interests,” and notes that ED “is considering an all-out ban or limiting the use of mandatory arbitration clauses in enrollment contracts.”

Tennessee Law Defunds University’s Office Of Diversity And Inclusion.

USA Today  (5/23, Maycan) reports a new Tennessee law defunds the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion “in favor of minority engineering scholarships and ‘In God We Trust’ decals for law enforcement vehicles.” While some of the office’s units will be reorganized, the school’s Pride Center will now be unstaffed. Students known as Price Center Ambassadors will now run the center. The piece says GOP state lawmakers have been urging defunding of the Diversity office “for a while now,” in part because of a statement from the office last summer asking the school to use “gender-neutral pronouns such as ‘ze.’”

From ASEE
SPECIAL SECTION: Prism Magazine on Whistleblowing
ASEE’s Prism magazine features engineering educators using their expertise to challenge authority when needed.

Retention Strategies
Going the Distance” is a video showcasing effective retention strategies at six universities.

Research and Development

Scientist Argues For Ground-Based Search For Killer Asteroids.

The New York Times  (5/23, Chang, Subscription Publication) reports on a disagreement by scientists over how best to identify and monitor asteroids that could enter Earth’s atmosphere. Former chief technologist at Microsoft, Nathan P. Myhrvold argues that ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope under construction in Chile “could find up to 90 percent of near-Earth asteroids if it spent more time looking low in the sky, closer to the Earth’s horizon.” That telescope is a $665 million collaboration of the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation and other organizations.

Toyota Resurrects Stair-Climbing Wheelchair Project.

Mass Device  (5/23, Perriello) reports that Toyota has announced that it will revive the iBot stair-climbing wheelchair developed by DEKA Research & Development. “The deal calls for DEKA to complete the development and launch of a new version of the iBot, the Japanese auto maker said. Toyota said it will also license the balancing technology developed by the R&D firm for medical rehabilitation and perhaps other purposes.” Mass Device notes that the iBot, which has received FDA approval, was previously shelved by Johnson & Johnson after the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said it would only reimburse patients with $6,000. Qmed  (5/23, Crotti) and the Christian Science Monitor  (5/23) also cover this story.

University Of Wisconsin-Madison Engineering Students Design Turbine To Power Cell Towers In India.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel  (5/23) reports a group of engineering and business students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison aiming to “make electricity more available in rural parts of India…has designed a wind turbine that could provide power to cellular phone towers.” The students are part of a team dubbed WiscWind, which “will compete this week in New Orleans at a national competition hosted by the American Wind Energy Association and sponsored by the Department of Energy.” Twelve schools are competing in “the wind industry’s version of the national Solar Decathlon. A Wisconsin team.”

Clemson Researchers Working On Rejection-Resistant Coating For Artificial Joints.

The Greenville (SC) News  (5/23) reports that a group of researchers at Clemson University are working on a coating to prevent the body from rejecting artificial joints, noting that the researchers have won a National Science Foundation grant for the work. The piece explains that an immune response from the body can “lead to increased loss of function and damage to the material.”

Engineers Tout “Chem-Phys Patch” For Monitoring Biochemical Signals.

HealthDay  (5/23, Preidt) reports University of California at San Diego engineers said they “developed a small, wearable health monitor they’re likening to the ‘Star Trek’ tricorder” called the Chem-Phys patch. The device “tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body” then “communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch,” providing “real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort.”

Workforce

Manufacturing Apprenticeships Increasingly Open To Women.

The Hartford (CT) Business Journal  (5/23, Seay), reporting on the growing number of women apprentices in US factories, profiles 21-year-old Hannah Lenoce, who is acquiring skills as a toolmaker at Marion Manufacturing in Cheshire, Connecticut. Lenoce, who is among 130 winners of the NAM-affiliated Manufacturing Institute’s 2016 STEP Ahead awards for women in manufacturing, said, “I really like the hands-on part” of her apprenticeship. “I really have to think. Every day there’s a new challenge.” Besides her “salary, health benefits and a matching 401(k) retirement-savings plan at Marion,” Lenoce is studying engineering at Central Connecticut State University tuition-free, an added incentive from company owner Doug Johnson, the story says.

Global Developments

Scotland On Its Way To Wind Energy “World Leader” With $4 Billion Wind Farm.

CNBC  (5/23, Frangoul) reports Scotland will “strengthen its credentials as a world leader in wind energy” after finalizing the $3.8 billion Beatrice Offshore Windfarm project, according to an announcement Monday. SSE, the company behind the 84-turbine project, predicted it would power 450,000 homes and called the project “one of the largest private investments ever made in Scottish infrastructure,” in a news release. Politicians “welcomed Monday’s announcement, with the Scottish government’s minister for business, innovation and energy describing it as ‘great news.’”

Poland Restricts Where Wind Farms Can Be Built, Citing Noise Complaints.

Reuters  (5/23, Barteczko) reports Poland has a new law restricting building wind farms close to houses, resulting in higher taxes for wind farm owners. Industry says the move could slow Poland’s move away from coal toward to renewables, and result in bankruptcies for wind farm projects. Poland’s ruling conservative Law and Justice party, the architects of the new regulations, said that the industry needed reforms to address citizens’ noise complaints about wind farms. The EU, however, is calling on Poland to increase its share of renewables in electricity generation to 15 percent by 2020 and decrease coal usage.

Engineering and Public Policy

Frac Sand Mining Said To Be Harming Midwest Farming Communities.

Nancy C. Loeb at Northwestern University’s Pritzker School of Law writes for the New York Times  (5/23, Loeb, Subscription Publication) on “the destruction of large areas of Midwestern farmland” resulting from sand mining for fracking operations. Rich agricultural land in Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota sits atop another a highly prized deposit of fine silica sand called St. Peter sandstone. “The Chicago Tribune found that mining companies had acquired at least 3,100 acres of prime farmland from 2005 to 2014,” Loeb writes, adding that the mining impact local communities and that silica is a carcinogen. Loeb argues that “unfettered frac sand mining is ruining the rural communities of the Midwest.”

Newport Bridge Error Will Cost Almost $500,000 To Fix.

The Wilmington (DE) News Journal  (5/23, Baker) reports Delaware’s Department of Transportation (DelDOT) in 2011 spent over $5 million to rebuilding a Newport bridge overpass to accommodate taller freight trains. In 2012, DelDOT found the bridge was too low. DelDOT subsequently requested a waiver from CSX to leave the bridge as is, but CSX refused. Correcting this error on the bridge will cost approximately $500,000. According to DelDOT state bridge engineer Barry Benton, the DelDOT survey team “mistakenly measured the clearance for the span from the ground rather than from the top of the tracks’ steel rails.”. Federal Highway Administration spokesman Doug Hecox said, “Incidents like this are teachable moments” that “actually serve to make the engineering community more thorough in their work.”

Also reporting on the story is the AP  (5/23).

Lake Erie Wind Test Project Gets DOE Grant.

The Medina (OH) Gazette  (5/23) reports that the Department of Energy has awarded a $3.7 million grant to Lake Erie Energy Development Corp. which intends to build a 20-megawatt demonstration wind farm on Lake Erie. LEEDCo is doing engineering work on the proposed project which is estimated to cost up to $128 million.

Following SunEdison’s Bankruptcy, SolarCity’s Role In K-Solar Program Expanded.

The AP  (5/23, Walsh) reports that New York’s “ambitious” K-Solar program “to install solar panels at New York’s public schools” must find a new partner after SunEdison, “one of the nation’s largest solar companies,” filed for bankruptcy last month. SunEdison’s bankruptcy leaves SolarCity as the only viable contractor for the program. Newsday (NY)  (5/23, Harrington) reports that following SunEdison’s bankruptcy, the state granted SolarCity the right to provide as many as 65 Long Island school districts with solar power, as it does elsewhere in the state. When the New York Power Authority awarded K-Solar “contracts to SolarCity and SunEdison, it essentially divided the state in half, with SunEdison getting western and central New York, and Long Island, while SolarCity got the rest of the state, including New York City.” However, with SunEdison declaring bankruptcy, the NYPA decided to shift its territories to SolarCity and “is contemplating issuing a new bid request for the program that could result in a second solar developer for K-Solar.” Under the program, “schools don’t own the panels, but enter into power purchase agreements to get electricity that is guaranteed to be cheaper than from a utility.” Once the contract ends, “schools can renew their contract, buy the systems or have SolarCity remove them.”

White House, Top House Democrats Back Chemical Regulation Bill.

The AP  (5/23, Daly) reports the White House said Monday it will support bipartisan legislation to overhaul the Toxic Substances Control Act. The White House announcement came hours after House Minority Leader Pelosi, House Minority Whip Hoyer, and Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ), the senior Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said they would support the measure. While the lawmakers said they “remain concerned that the bill limits states’ ability to act aggressively on toxic substances,” recent changes by Democrats “ensure the measure will protect families and communities from toxic substances.” Support from the top Democrats and the White House “clear[s] the way for the bill’s passage in the House and Senate.”

A National Journal  (5/23, Plautz, Subscription Publication) analysis says that although the legislation “gives the EPA more regulatory power, industry groups want a single national regulatory system instead of a patchwork of state schemes,” which “had to be balanced with concerns of health groups who wanted strong regulation and testing.” Noting “a flurry of lobbying around the bill,” National Journal says more than “130 separate lobbying-disclosure filings were entered in just the first quarter of 2016 alone that mentioned work on either the Senate or House TSCA-reform bill.”

New Mexico Sues EPA Over Gold King Mine Spill.

The Farmington (NM) Daily Times  (5/23, Smith) reports that New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas has filed a lawsuit in US District Court in Albuquerque against the EPA “and two mine owners for economic and environmental damages caused by the Gold King Mine spill.” The suit, which, in addition to the EPA, names EPA Administrator McCarthy, “Environmental Restoration, Kinross Gold Corp., Kinross Gold USA Inc. and Sunnyside Gold Corp.,” is “demanding the defendants ‘abate the imminent and substantial threats’ from the Sunnyside Mine network and remediate residual contamination from mine releases.” In addition, the state is seeking “compensation for environmental and economic damages.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

STEM Makes A Difference In Early Learning.

US News & World Report  (5/23) reports on four year old children doing engineering through STEM using “the engineering six-step method” of “identifying the problem, planning the solution, building the solution, testing the solution, reflecting/revising when it doesn’t work, and sharing the results when it does work.”

Massachusetts High School Students Design Water Filtration System.

The Houston Chronicle  (5/23) reports that over “two years, Dylan Nadeau, Patrick Casey and Nick Valiton, all seniors less than a month from graduation, designed and built a non-electric water-filtration system for which they applied and received a provisional U.S. patent.” According to Casey, “the whole system is estimated to cost $379, which could supply 30 people for four years before the filter has to be replaced at a cost of $159…The filter would need to be replaced every 40,000 gallons.”

Article Explores Why “Maker Faires” Are Important For Kids.

TIME  (5/23) reports that over 150,000 people attended this year’s at the San Mateo Events Center. According to Time, “these shows have become increasingly important as a means to introduce kids to” science, technology, engineering and math. Time reports that “at Maker Faires, children get hands-on experience with electronic gadgets, from programming to soldering. Kids can play with robotic kits, try building a drone and generally tinker with all sorts of gizmos.”

Monday’s Lead Stories

IBM Research Team Builds Nanosized Neuron-Like Device.
Northeastern University Civil Engineering Students Helping Design City’s Accessibility Infrastructure.
Undersea Robot Sparks Controversy Related To Anthropomorphism In Robotics.
How GM Lightweights Its Vehicles.
Report: US Nuclear Plants Need To Improve Safety, Monitoring Of Radioactive Pools.
National Robotics Competition Held In Pennsylvania.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier announces seven new plastics and polymers books at SPE ANTEC 2016
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of new, fully updated editions of Fatigue and Tribological Properties of Plastics and Elastomers and Multilayer Flexible Packaging. Reflecting the rapid advances made in the field, these two highly anticipated books, along with five additional new plastics and polymers titles, will be featured in Elsevier’s booth # 227 at SPE ANTEC 2016, May 23-25, in Indianapolis, IN.
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The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons announces OA option
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and its publishing partner of the AAOS, Wolters Kluwer, have announced that the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS) will begin offering an open access publishing option for authors of manuscripts accepted for publication. Authors of manuscripts who opt for the open access choice retain copyright to their work and AAOS will make the work freely available online to anyone wishing to access it.
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Nominations for eight seats on the IDPF Board of Directors now open
Nominations are now open for eight seats on the IDPF Board of Directors. The IDPF Board (fourteen members including the President) is elected by the members to manage the organization’s business and affairs. This includes developing the vision and strategic plan and providing oversight and direction to staff and volunteers carrying out the work. Directors serve two-year terms. At least one new Director will be elected, as one seat in this class is vacant.
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Institutional budgets will increase by 1.4% in 2016, says PCG Library Budget Survey
Results of the 2016 Library Budget Predictions survey, research carried out annually by Ingenta’s publishing consultancy arm, Publishers Communication Group (PCG), have been released, stating that institutional library budgets across the globe will increase by 1.4 percent overall this year. Despite the rise in library budgets overall, the mature markets measured in the survey show very limited expansion.
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OASPA webinar panelists discuss attribution
Cameron Neylon from Curtin University, Michael Carroll from American University, and Ernesto Priego from the City University London recently joined OASPA for a webinar to discuss attribution in open access publishing – an important, timely issue for publishers that goes hand-in-hand with licensing. Catriona MacCallum (PLOS) chaired the discussion. The Copyright Clearance Center hosted the webinar.
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Portico announces preservation deals with SciPress and the Association for Research and Vision in Ophthalmology
Digital preservation specialist Portico has announced that SciPress and the Association for Research and Vision in Ophthalmology will preserve e-journals with Portico, ensuring that they will be secure and available into the future. SciPress is a scientific publishing house with a strong focus on theoretical and applied physical sciences, engineering, earth sciences, social sciences and humanities. The Association for Research and Vision in Ophthalmology (ARVO) claims to be the largest eye and vision research organisation in the world.
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Ex Libris in deal with GreenData, expands operations in Spanish Market
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that it is increasing its investment in the Spanish market and has reached an agreement with its Barcelona-based partner, GreenData, that will see Ex Libris playing a direct role in the Spanish market. Under the agreement, GreenData will remain an Ex Libris business development partner while the marketing, sales, and support responsibilities will move to Ex Libris.
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Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: SSP website (SSP and STM Collaborate to Promote the Value of Mentorship in Scholarly Communications for Early-Career Professionals); Xuan Yu (Harvest Tiny Data in Scientific Papers); Stephen Lotinga (Think academic publishers are greedy? Do your research); Thomas Leeper (Elsevier purchase SSRN: Social scientists face questions over whether centralised repository is in their interests); Rick Anderson (Sci-Hub and Academic Identity Theft: An Open Letter to University Faculty Everywhere); and Michael S. Evans (Portable Journal Acceptance?). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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