Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

MJIIT and Yamaguchi University select Clarivate Analytics Solutions for research platform
Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology (MJIIT) and Yamaguchi University have announced a collaboration to build a comprehensive research platform using global patent information and IP analysis tools from Clarivate Analytics and financial information from Thomson Reuters Eikon. This platform will enable MJIIT students, researchers and academics to perform deep IP analysis across multiple disciplines, and gain insights about industry trends and emerging technologies.
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Taylor & Francis Group and the Royal Statistical Society partner to sponsor the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences MSc teaching programme
Academic publisher Taylor & Francis Group will be working with the Royal Statistical Society (RSS) to sponsor the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) and its MSc teaching programme for a minimum of four years. The sponsorship fund will be used to cover travel costs for Royal Statistical Society members to teach local MSc students at AIMS centres across Africa which will assist in the much-needed growth of the discipline across Africa.
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ProQuest and De Gruyter join forces to provide more ebook choices for OASIS users
ProQuest has partnered with De Gruyter to make De Gruyter ebooks available for purchase through the OASIS® system. Spanning 28 subject areas including architecture and design, computer science, economics, engineering, law and music, De Gruyter provides access to 26,000 ebooks from over 15 international imprints.
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Wolters Kluwer demonstrating evidence-based clinical content, integrated point of care solutions at 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference & Exhibition
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer is showcasing its suite of point of care solutions in booth #1543 at the2017 HIMSS Annual Conference & Exhibition, taking place Feb. 19-23 in Orlando, Fla. Visitors to the Wolters Kluwer exhibit can learn how to overcome interoperability barriers to deliver the actionable, evidence-based knowledge clinicians need to improve care outcomes in today’s value-based healthcare environment.
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JBJS, Inc., NEJM Group and Area9 collaborate on adaptive learning in orthopaedics
The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. has announced the development of a new product – JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+. Using research-proven, state-of-the-art adaptive learning technology developed by Area9 and employed by NEJM Knowledge+, JBJS Clinical Classroom will provide orthopaedic surgeons with a personalised learning experience at any stage in their career.
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Atypon announces new development hub in the Czech Republic and Greece, continues International expansion
Publishing technology company Atypon has opened new development hubs in the Czech Republic and Greece and is expanding its presence in Jordan by 50% in response to the needs of a growing customer base. Twenty software engineers in the company’s new Prague office will work on further expanding the comprehensive feature set of Literatum, the scholarly and professional publishing industry’s most widely used online publishing platform.
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Journal publishing platform ARPHA and TrendMD announce new collaboration
Content recommendation engine TrendMD has announced a new collaboration with journal publishing platformARPHA. Under the deal, readers of all journals under Pensoft’s imprint, as well as those using the white-label publishing solution provided by the platform, will be given a useful list of recommended articles related to the study they are reading.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

In Test, UPS Drone Delivers Package In Florida.

ABC World News Tonight (2/21, story 11, 0:25, Muir) reported, “UPS is testing drone delivery” with a test flight in Florida in which a UPS driver delivered a package while a drone, launched from the top of the truck, delivered another package at the same time.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Lopez) reports the drone “flew autonomously toward its destination, dropped a package and then returned to the vehicle as the driver continued on a delivery route.” John Dodero, vice president of industrial engineering at UPS, said, “We see this as an exploration into this new technology.” He added there is no timeline for putting it into wider use, in the words of Reuters, “partly because federal authorities are still developing regulations on how to use the technology.” As UPS confronts “lower margins for e-commerce” drones could help reduce costs. USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Weise) reports UPS estimates that reducing the distance each drivers covers a mile a day would save the company up to $50 million annually.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Sasso) reports Mark Wallace, UPS’s senior vice president of global engineering and sustainability, said, “Drones won’t replace our uniformed service providers,” adding, “it really is there to assist.” The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports Wallace “says the test has implications for service in rural areas where deliveries are far apart and costly.”

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Yamanouchi) reports UPS chief information officer Juan Perez said, “I can imagine a day when we dispatch a fleet of autonomous cars…. Now imagine a day when these autonomous vehicles have a UPS delivery person on board” delivering packages and deploying drones.

In contrast to other coverage, Gizmodo Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Estes) takes a negative tone as it reports that while the first demonstration of the drone went well, UPS “bungled” a second demo requested by reporters. “Some sort of interference – possibly from the broadcast reporters’ cameras – caused an issue with the drone’s compass,” and when the drone sought to abort its launch, it tipped to the side and “was nearly crushed by the still-closing lid of the vehicle.” According to a UPS representative explained that “when the aircraft tipped sideways, a human operator took over and steadied the drone before taking off and landing it on the ground unharmed.” The bug “means that UPS is going to do a lot more work before letting these things fly in public.” Furthermore, with the increasing complexity wireless communication, “if multimillion dollar electronic companies can’t even figure out how to make wireless headphones work perfect, the notion of a building a safe, nationwide wireless drone delivery system seems damn near impossible.”

Higher Education

Tulane Undergraduates Win NASA “Big Idea” Engineering Competition.

WWL-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter New Orleans (2/20, Farris) reports online about the five Tulane undergraduates who won NASA’s Big Idea Challenge for Spacecraft Design, having presented their concept “to NASA researchers, designing a structure that is huge in space but that can fit in a smaller rocket cargo hold to get there.” The story casts the Tulane team as the underdogs in the competition up against “top of the line, brilliant” competitors from super elite programs, “but this unusual group, honored just to be finalists, came up with the Sunflower, a compact hexagon, that ‘blooms’ or keeps unfolding and expanding.”

Harvard Law Project Sues DOJ For For-Profit School Settlement Documents.

According to the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Douglas-Gabriel), Harvard Law School’s Project on Predatory Student Lending is suing the Justice Department for withholding documents from a 2015 settlement in which the operator of for-profit schools called Education Management agreed to pay $95.5 million to resolve allegations of violating the federal ban on incentive compensation. Harvard Law clinic attorneys say the documents it has requested via the Freedom of Information Act would make it easier for affected students to have “borrow defense to repayment” claims approved, but the Justice Department first said a court order prevented the release of the files. Federal prosecutors haves since said the documents are not subject to FOIA.

DeVos Expected To Decide Fate Of ACCJC Soon.

The San Francisco Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is expected to decide the fate of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges in the near future, noting that the “controversial accreditor” has been locked in a dispute over the accreditation of City College of San Francisco. The piece notes that the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity is set to vote on a recommendation from ED officials that ACCJC “retain its authority over community colleges for another 18 months despite complaints that the agency failed to meet standards, treated CCSF unfairly and lacked transparency.”

Judge Clears Way For ED To Withdraw Recognition From ACICS.

Huffington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) contributor David Halperin writes that a federal judge on Tuesday “denied a motion filed by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) for a preliminary injunction that would have blocked the U.S. Department of Education from proceeding with the de-recognition of the organization.” US Judge Reggie Walton said the accreditor “had not demonstrated a substantial likelihood of prevailing on the merits of the case, particularly because then-Secretary of Education John King determined in December that ACICS was in substantial noncompliance with the rules governing accreditor performance.”

CCCSE Report Examines Financial Struggles Of Community College Students.

Diverse Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20, Morris) examines a new report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement showing “a lack of resources as the primary reason” for why some community college students take longer than usual to complete their degrees. Furthermore, “the constraints of financial need limit not only students’ ability to complete a degree, but also their visions for the future,” the story says. Commenting in the story is CCCSE Executive Director Evelyn Waiwaiole, PhD, who says “We spend a tremendous amount of time thinking about how to help students succeed academically, but if we don’t also think about how to prevent this mindset of struggling financially, then we will continue to see students walk away from our institutions and not complete.”

From ASEE
Engineering Research Council Meeting
Register now for this event, where ASEE members delve into the federal research funding world, hearing directly from staff at NSF, NIH, DoD, and others. This short video explains why attendance is valuable.

Start Smart with “Smart Start”
Researchers and innovators will want to be in this FREE, two-week course to improve STEM education in both formal and informal settings, at all levels. The course kicks off at the ASEE Annual Conference in June. Learn more and apply here.

NEW Report on Engineering Technology Education
The report, from the National Academy of Engineering, was written with the input of several ASEE members. It is available online for free.

Research and Development

University Of New Mexico Wins AFRL Contract To Develop Semiconductors.

The Albuquerque (NM) Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports that the Air Force Research Laboratory has given the University of New Mexico School of Engineering a $7 million contract “to help develop alternative semiconductor materials for electronics that may perform better than today’s products in harsh conditions.” Engineers at the school will develop and build “next-generation materials and devices for electronics in space.” AFRL Program Manager Jesse Mee said the contract is “part of an AFRL project to build faster, and possibly more robust, electrical devices for satellites.”

UT Austin Researchers Develop Ultra-Thin Nanoelectronic Thread For Durable Neural Implants.

IEEE Spectrum Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Johnson) reports about new developments in nanoelectronic thread, highlighting research out of the University of Texas at Austin that “developed neural probes” made of this NET that “are so thin and tiny that when they are implanted, they don’t trigger the human body to create scar tissue, which limits their recording efficacy” for single-unit recording.

Virginia Tech Project Brings Together Artists, Designers, Engineers To Make Better Robots.

The Augusta (VA) Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20) reports on the ESCHER “humanoid robot created to respond to natural or man-made disasters,” developed at Virginia Tech’s Terrestrial Robotics Engineering & Controls Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The story focuses on the collaboration among “artists, designers, and engineers…to create better products,” in this case a humanoid robot that has “a contoured suit of 3-D printed body panels for ESCHER to promote familiarity and recognition of the robot as an emergency first responder, while also providing protection from impact, heat, and water damage.”

Professor Outlines Prospects For Construction On Mars.

On its website, CNN Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Springer) posts an interview with University of Southern California Professor of Engineering Behrokh Khoshnevis about the prospects for a colony on Mars and his research of technologies intended to facilitate construction on the planet. Last year, Khoshnevis won NASA’s In-Situ Materials Challenge for his 3D-printing method designed to produce construction materials using Mars’ surface powder. In the interview, Khoshnevis explained the requirements for transporting such a system to Mars and the infrastructure system needed before establishing human habitats. He said that bigger payloads and increasing commercial interest in space could make space construction common within 50 years.

Global Developments

German Court Bans Disclosure Of Emissions Scandal Documents In Audi Case.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports a German labor court Tuesday prohibited the public disclosure of documents pertaining to VW’s emissions scandal while conducting “a hearing for wrongful dismissal brought by a former employee at VW subsidiary Audi (NSUG.DE).” The hearing originally started in public, but Audi’s lawyers sought privacy “when the plaintiff’s lawyer mentioned an email exchange in 2012 between engineers about emissions of Audi cars in the United States.” The court approved Audi’s motion and observers were asked to leave the hearing. Hans-Georg Kauffeld, the lawyer for fired Audi engineer Ulrich Weiss, said, “I regret that the public was barred.”

Industry News

Boeing Planning Overhaul Of Satellite Building Process.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Pasztor, Subscription Publication) reports that Boeing is taking steps to streamline its process for building satellites, including plans to adopt simpler, modular designs that incorporate technologies like 3-D printing for faster assembly requiring fewer workers. Paul Rusnock, who leads Boeing’s satellite business, explained that the changes to the company’s highly-customized, by-hand assembly procedures are necessary to keep Boeing competitive in a business landscape increasingly occupied by small-satellite makers already using standardized processes that enable faster, cheaper production.

Boeing Awarded Contract For JCSAT-18/Kacifit-1 Satellite. Space News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Subscription Publication) reports that on Monday, Boeing announced that it has won the contract to produce a satellite that will be owned jointly by Sky Perfect JSAT Corporation and Kacific Broadband Satellites. The JCSAT-18/Kacific-1 spacecraft, which is scheduled to launch in 2019, “will provide mobile and broadband services in the Asia Pacific region.”

Uber Rolls Our Self-Driving Cars Available For Pickups In Arizona.

TechCrunch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Dickey) reports Uber announced its fleet of self-driving Volvo XC90s is now available to passengers in Arizona. The vehicles will be available to users in Tempe, Arizona, and will feature two driver engineers to help each car operate or take over if necessary. Running into legal issues after not obtaining a California self-driving test permit, the company’s pilot self-driving program moved in December from San Francisco to Arizona, where Governor Doug Ducey has “been a proponent of the plan since the day these automated vehicles showed up,” telling the company it was welcome in the state “with open arms and wide open roads.” CNET News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) notes that because Arizona’s autonomous regulations are more relaxed, “there’s a good chance the XC90s will stick around for a while.”

The step is a positive one for Uber, but as The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Hawkins) reports, the company still faces hurdles after several bad press incidents. The company recently faced a #DeleteUber campaign and allegations of widespread sexism, so its unsure “the rollout of a new self-driving pilot will do much to repair the company’s reputation.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Automakers Urge Pruitt To Withdraw Obama-era Fuel-efficiency Rules.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Shepardson) reports the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers on Tuesday asked EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to withdraw an Obama administration decision to lock in vehicle emission rules through 2025. Mitch Bainwol, the group’s president, said in a letter to Pruitt the decision was “the product of egregious procedural and substantive defects” and is “riddled with indefensible assumptions, inadequate analysis and a failure to engage with contrary evidence.” Bainwol’s request follows a separate letter to President Donald Trump earlier this month from auto industry executive urging Trump to revisit the decision. Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/22, Beene) reports the group asked the EPA chief “to resume a review of the standards in conjunction with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is developing vehicle fuel economy regulations for 2022-2025.”

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Spector, Subscription Publication) reports a week before President Trump came into office, the EPA announced it was keeping its fuel economy targets, even though the full review with NHTSA and other partners was not supposed to finish until 2018. The EPA’s decision on the matter cannot be revised lightly, however, as environmental groups would surely take any changes to the midterm review of the regulations to court.

Scholar Urges Replacement Of CAFE Standards. Ian Adams with the R Street Institute writes for The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) “Pundits Blog” that the fuel economy standards “force Americans to pay more for cars and light trucks while providing few ecological, economic or security benefits.” CAFE standards are regulated by the EPA and NHTSA, and Adams writes that when the EPA finalized stricter standards 14 months earlier than scheduled, NHTSA was pressed to conform to avoid divergent policies. Adams says the CAFE standards should be replaced with a “unified supply-side solution” offering tax incentives to companies whose fleets outperform emissions targets.

WTimes: Fuel Efficiency Raising Auto Fatalities. The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) editorializes that auto fatalities that wee falling for years but are rising again, are “likely the fault of government supervision gone awry.” The Times blames CAFE, standards imposed by the Obama administration which drive automakers to use more plastic and composites, and less steel “in pursuit of Mr. Obama’s radical environmental agenda of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions.”

Sources: Trump Set To Issue Orders On Emissions, Waterways Rules.

Drawing on reporting by the Washington Post, The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Henry) reports that according to unnamed sources, President Trump is poised to issue executive orders instructing the EPA to rewrite a 2015 rule limiting greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants. Another order would “instruct the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to redo another 2015 rule that gives the federal government more regulatory power over waterways,” and immediately lift a moratorium on federal land coal leasing. Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports that EPA employees were not given the details of the orders, according to two EPA sources.

Trump Administration Prepares “Review” Of Clean Power Plan.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Subscription Publication) reports that the EPA’s new administrator “is expected to begin unraveling landmark climate policies in the opening days of his job.” White House officials have already begun reviewing an executive order that would weaken the Clean Power Plan and cancel the Climate Action Plan, “the aspirational framework” aimed at reducing greenhouse gases nationwide.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21, Subscription Publication) reports that in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Pruitt openly questioned whether the EPA has the “tools” to restrict carbon dioxide emissions. His statements seemed to contrast his testimony at last month’s confirmation hearing, where he said, “I believe EPA has a very important role at regulating the emissions of CO2,” during one exchange with Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Republican Plan For Clean Air Act May Target Carbon.

E&E Daily Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Subscription Publication) reports House and Senate panels with jurisdiction over the Clean Air Act aim to adjust the EPA’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the law. House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Rep. John Shimkus predicted a “rifle shot” approach to reforming the Clean Air Act with Vice Chairman Rep. Joe Barton the point man on any effort targeting carbon dioxide, according to Shimkus. “My intent would be to clarify as originally written CO2 was not a criterion pollutant,” Barton told E&E News this week. “It does not mean that it’s not a greenhouse gas — it is — but it was not one of the regulated ones.” Barton and Shimkus both have disputed scientists’ consensus on the role of carbon dioxide in global warming.

Elementary/Secondary Education

High School Teacher Wins AIAA Foundation Educator Achievement Award.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports that Lyons Township High School aviation and engineering teacher Dave Root was selected as one of five educators across the country to receive the AIAA Foundation Educator Achievement Award, which recognizes “outstanding achievement in aeronautics instruction through the use of integrative STEM learning activities.” An Aerospace Spotlight Awards Gala will be held in May at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington DC to distribute the awards.

Kansas Women Engineers’ Group Seeks To Introduce Girls To Engineering Careers.

Next week, the Society of Women Engineers’ Kansas City Section is hosting its seventh annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day, the Kansas City (MO) Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports. At least 270 female high school students are expected to attend, and more than 100 female mentors will assist students at the event. International Space Station associate program scientist Tara Ruttley is participating as the event’s keynote speaker. Society of Women Engineers president Adriana Aguilar commented, “While women represent a significant portion of the workforce, they are still grossly underrepresented in engineering.” The Star notes ED on Tuesday released data by Change the Education, a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) literacy advocacy group, that claimed Kansas and other states using the Next Generation Science Standards “are showing improvement in efforts to integrate engineering and technology into their science classrooms.”

Dyson Hosts Chicago-Area High School Students For National Engineering Week.

In an online video, the Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) highlighted the National Engineering Week event held at Dyson’s Chicago-based location. Area high school students collaborated with Dyson and showcased their prototype designs. Dyson graduate talent acquisition partner Kyle Polke commented, “Our main focus is to inspire the next generation of engineers.”

Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan Discusses Violence, STEM Careers With Chicago Students.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/21) reports former Education Secretary Arne Duncan spoke with Chicago Vocational Career Academy students on Friday afternoon. During a round table discussion, the conversation “veered between violence and ideas for apps that might help.” Duncan expressed alarm at how many students knew people who had been shot and told them, “That’s not OK. It’s not fair that you guys are growing up like that, and that we as adults have let you guys down. And we’ve got to do a lot better.” He also reiterated the importance of science, technology, engineering, and math instruction as a means to introduce students to life beyond violence. “We have to give them a glimpse of what exists outside of their block or their neighborhood,” Duncan asserted, and added that instruction in coding, research, or even app design “has to start to become the norm.”

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 101 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 101 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 101 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Physical modeling for selective laser sintering process Gobal, A., Ravani, B. 2017 Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering ,
17 ( 2 ) , art. no. 021002
2 . Influence of regional nighttime atmospheric regimes on canopy turbulence and gradients at a closed and open forest in mountain-valley terrain Wharton, S., Ma, S., Baldocchi, D.D., Falk, M., Newman, J.F., Osuna, J.L., Bible, K. 2017 Agricultural and Forest Meteorology ,
237-238 pp. 18 – 29 .
3 . Search for high-mass diphoton resonances in proton–proton collisions at 13 TeV and combination with 8 TeV search Khachatryan, V., Sirunyan, A.M., Tumasyan, A., Adam, W., Asilar, E., Bergauer, T., Brandstetter, J., Brondolin, E., Dragicevic, M., Erö, J., Flechl, M., Friedl, M., Frühwirth, R., Ghete, V.M., Hartl, C., Hörmann, N., Hrubec, J., Jeitler, M., König, A., Krätschmer, I., Liko, D., Matsushita, T., Mikulec, I., Rabady, D., Rad, N., Rahbaran, B., Rohringer, H., Schieck, J., Strauss, J., Waltenberger, W., Wulz, C.-E., Mossolov, V., Shumeiko, N., Suarez Gonzalez, J., Dvornikov, O., Makarenko, V., Zykunov, V., Alderweireldt, S., De Wolf, E.A., Janssen, X., Lauwers, J., Van De Klundert, M., Van Haevermaet, H., Van Mechelen, P., Van Remortel, N., Van Spilbeeck, A., Abu Zeid, S., Blekman, F., D’Hondt, J., Daci, N., De Bruyn, I., Deroover, K., Lowette, S., Moortgat, S., Moreels, L., Olbrechts, A., Python, Q., Tavernier, S., Van Doninck, W., Van Mulders, P., Van Parijs, I., Brun, H., Clerbaux, B., De Lentdecker, G., Delannoy, H., Fasanella, G., Favart, L., Goldouzian, R., Grebenyuk, A., Karapostoli, G., Lenzi, T., Léonard, A., Luetic, J., Maerschalk, T., Marinov, A., Randle-conde, A., Seva, T., Vander Velde, C., Vanlaer, P., Vannerom, D., Yonamine, R., Zenoni, F., Zhang, F., Cimmino, A., Cornelis, T., Dobur, D., Fagot, A., Garcia, G., Gul, M., Khvastunov, I., Poyraz, D., Salva, S., Schöfbeck, R., Sharma, A., Tytgat, M., Van Driessche, W., Yazgan, E., Zaganidis, N., Bakhshiansohi, H., Beluffi, C., Bondu, O., Brochet, S., Bruno, G., Caudron, A., De Visscher, S., Delaere, C., Delcourt, M., Francois, B., Giammanco, A., Jafari, A., Jez, P., Komm, M., Krintiras, G., Lemaitre, V., Magitteri, A., Mertens, A., Musich, M., Nuttens, C., Piotrzkowski, K., Quertenmont, L., Selvaggi, M., Vidal Marono, M., Wertz, S., Beliy, N., Aldá Júnior, W.L., Alves, F.L., Alves, G.A., Brito, L., Hensel, C., Moraes, A., Pol, M.E., Rebello Teles, P., Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E., Carvalho, W., Chinellato, J., Custódio, A., Da Costa, E.M., Da Silveira, G.G., De Jesus Damiao, D., De Oliveira Martins, C., Fonseca De Souza, S., Huertas Guativa, L.M., Malbouisson, H., Matos Figueiredo, D., Mora Herrera, C., Mundim, L., Nogima, H., Prado Da Silva, W.L., Santoro, A., Sznajder, A., Tonelli Manganote, E.J., Vilela Pereira, A., Ahuja, S., Bernardes, C.A., Dogra, S., Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.R., Gregores, E.M., Mercadante, P.G., Moon, C.S., Novaes, S.F., Padula, S.S., Romero Abad, D., Ruiz Vargas, J.C., Aleksandrov, A., Hadjiiska, R., Iaydjiev, P., Rodozov, M., Stoykova, S., Sultanov, G., Vutova, M., Dimitrov, A., Glushkov, I., Litov, L., Pavlov, B., Petkov, P., Fang, W., Ahmad, M., Bian, J.G., Chen, G.M., Chen, H.S., Chen, M., Chen, Y., Cheng, T., Jiang, C.H., Leggat, D., Liu, Z., Romeo, F., Shaheen, S.M., Spiezia, A., Tao, J., Wang, C., Wang, Z., Zhang, H., Zhao, J., Ban, Y., Chen, G., Li, Q., Liu, S., Mao, Y., Qian, S.J., Wang, D., Xu, Z., Avila, C., Cabrera, A., Chaparro Sierra, L.F., Florez, C., Gomez, J.P., González Hernández, C.F., Ruiz Alvarez, J.D., Sanabria, J.C., Godinovic, N., Lelas, D., Puljak, I., Ribeiro Cipriano, P.M., Sculac, T., Antunovic, Z., Kovac, M., Brigljevic, V., Ferencek, D., Kadija, K., Micanovic, S., Sudic, L., Susa, T., Attikis, A., Mavromanolakis, G., Mousa, J., Nicolaou, C., Ptochos, F., Razis, P.A., Rykaczewski, H., Tsiakkouri, D., Finger, M., Finger, M., Carrera Jarrin, E., Abdelalim, A.A., El-khateeb, E., Salama, E., Kadastik, M., Murumaa, M., Perrini, L., Raidal, M., Tiko, A., Veelken, C., Eerola, P., Pekkanen, J., Voutilainen, M., Härkönen, J., Järvinen, T., Karimäki, V., Kinnunen, R., Lampén, T., Lassila-Perini, K., Lehti, S., Lindén, T., Luukka, P., Tuominiemi, J., Tuovinen, E., Wendland, L., Talvitie, J., Tuuva, T., Besancon, M., Couderc, F., Dejardin, M., Denegri, D., Fabbro, B., Faure, J.L., Favaro, C., Ferri, F., Ganjour, S., Ghosh, S., Givernaud, A., Gras, P., Hamel de Monchenault, G., Jarry, P., Kucher, I., Locci, E., Machet, M., Malcles, J., Rander, J., Rosowsky, A., Titov, M., Zghiche, A., Abdulsalam, A., Antropov, I., Baffioni, S., Beaudette, F., Busson, P., Cadamuro, L., Chapon, E., Charlot, C., Davignon, O., Granier de Cassagnac, R., Jo, M., Lisniak, S., Miné, P., Nguyen, M., Ochando, C., Ortona, G., Paganini, P., Pigard, P., Regnard, S., Salerno, R., Sirois, Y., Strebler, T., Yilmaz, Y., Zabi, A., Agram, J.-L., Andrea, J., Aubin, A., Bloch, D., Brom, J.-M., Buttignol, M., Chabert, E.C., Chanon, N., Collard, C., Conte, E., Coubez, X., Fontaine, J.-C., Gelé, D., Goerlach, U., Le Bihan, A.-C., Skovpen, K., Van Hove, P., Gadrat, S., Beauceron, S., Bernet, C., Boudoul, G., Bouvier, E., Carrillo Montoya, C.A., Chierici, R., Contardo, D., Courbon, B., Depasse, P., El Mamouni, H., Fan, J., Fay, J., Gascon, S., Gouzevitch, M., Grenier, G., Ille, B., Lagarde, F., Laktineh, I.B., Lethuillier, M., Mirabito, L., Pequegnot, A.L., Perries, S., Popov, A., Sabes, D., Sordini, V., Vander Donckt, M., 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Kilminster, B., Ngadiuba, J., Pinna, D., Rauco, G., Robmann, P., Salerno, D., Yang, Y., Zucchetta, A., Candelise, V., Doan, T.H., Jain, S., Khurana, R., Konyushikhin, M., Kuo, C.M., Lin, W., Lu, Y.J., Pozdnyakov, A., Yu, S.S., Kumar, A., Chang, P., Chang, Y.H., Chang, Y.W., Chao, Y., Chen, K.F., Chen, P.H., Dietz, C., Fiori, F., Hou, W.-S., Hsiung, Y., Liu, Y.F., Lu, R.-S., Miñano Moya, M., Paganis, E., Psallidas, A., Tsai, J.F., Tzeng, Y.M., Asavapibhop, B., Singh, G., Srimanobhas, N., Suwonjandee, N., Adiguzel, A., Cerci, S., Damarseckin, S., Demiroglu, Z.S., Dozen, C., Dumanoglu, I., Girgis, S., Gokbulut, G., Guler, Y., Hos, I., Kangal, E.E., Kara, O., Kayis Topaksu, A., Kiminsu, U., Oglakci, M., Onengut, G., Ozdemir, K., Sunar Cerci, D., Tali, B., Turkcapar, S., Zorbakir, I.S., Zorbilmez, C., Bilin, B., Bilmis, S., Isildak, B., Karapinar, G., Yalvac, M., Zeyrek, M., Gülmez, E., Kaya, M., Kaya, O., Yetkin, E.A., Yetkin, T., Cakir, A., Cankocak, K., Sen, S., Grynyov, B., Levchuk, L., 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S., Tapper, A., Uchida, K., Vazquez Acosta, M., Virdee, T., Wright, J., Zenz, S.C., Cole, J.E., Hobson, P.R., Khan, A., Kyberd, P., Leslie, D., Reid, I.D., Symonds, P., Teodorescu, L., Turner, M., Borzou, A., Call, K., Dittmann, J., Hatakeyama, K., Liu, H., Pastika, N., Cooper, S.I., Henderson, C., Rumerio, P., West, C., Arcaro, D., Avetisyan, A., Bose, T., Gastler, D., Rankin, D., Richardson, C., Rohlf, J., Sulak, L., Zou, D., Benelli, G., Berry, E., Cutts, D., Garabedian, A., Hakala, J., Heintz, U., Hogan, J.M., Jesus, O., Kwok, K.H.M., Laird, E., Landsberg, G., Mao, Z., Narain, M., Piperov, S., Sagir, S., Spencer, E., Syarif, R., Breedon, R., Breto, G., Burns, D., Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M., Chauhan, S., Chertok, M., Conway, J., Conway, R., Cox, P.T., Erbacher, R., Flores, C., Funk, G., Gardner, M., Ko, W., Lander, R., Mclean, C., Mulhearn, M., Pellett, D., Pilot, J., Shalhout, S., Smith, J., Squires, M., Stolp, D., Tripathi, M., Bravo, C., Cousins, R., Dasgupta, A., Everaerts, P., Florent, A., Hauser, J., Ignatenko, M., Mccoll, N., Saltzberg, D., Schnaible, C., Takasugi, E., Valuev, V., Weber, M., Burt, K., Clare, R., Ellison, J., Gary, J.W., Ghiasi Shirazi, S.M.A., Hanson, G., Heilman, J., Jandir, P., Kennedy, E., Lacroix, F., Long, O.R., Olmedo Negrete, M., Paneva, M.I., Shrinivas, A., Si, W., Wei, H., Wimpenny, S., Yates, B.R., Branson, J.G., Cerati, G.B., Cittolin, S., Derdzinski, M., Holzner, A., Klein, D., Krutelyov, V., Letts, J., Macneill, I., Olivito, D., Padhi, S., Pieri, M., Sani, M., Sharma, V., Simon, S., Tadel, M., Vartak, A., Wasserbaech, S., Welke, C., Wood, J., Würthwein, F., Yagil, A., Zevi Della Porta, G., Amin, N., Bhandari, R., Bradmiller-Feld, J., Campagnari, C., Dishaw, A., Dutta, V., Franco Sevilla, M., George, C., Golf, F., Gouskos, L., Gran, J., Heller, R., Incandela, J., Mullin, S.D., Ovcharova, A., Qu, H., Richman, J., Stuart, D., Suarez, I., Yoo, J., Anderson, D., Apresyan, A., Bendavid, J., Bornheim, A., Bunn, J., Chen, Y., Duarte, J., Lawhorn, J.M., Mott, A., Newman, H.B., Pena, C., Spiropulu, M., Vlimant, J.R., Xie, S., Zhu, R.Y., Andrews, M.B., Azzolini, V., Ferguson, T., Paulini, M., Russ, J., Sun, M., Vogel, H., Vorobiev, I., Weinberg, M., Cumalat, J.P., Ford, W.T., Jensen, F., Johnson, A., Krohn, M., Mulholland, T., Stenson, K., Wagner, S.R., Alexander, J., Chaves, J., Chu, J., Dittmer, S., Mcdermott, K., Mirman, N., Nicolas Kaufman, G., Patterson, J.R., Rinkevicius, A., Ryd, A., Skinnari, L., Soffi, L., Tan, S.M., Tao, Z., Thom, J., Tucker, J., Wittich, P., Zientek, M., Winn, D., Abdullin, S., Albrow, M., Apollinari, G., Banerjee, S., Bauerdick, L.A.T., Beretvas, A., Berryhill, J., Bhat, P.C., Bolla, G., Burkett, K., Butler, J.N., Cheung, H.W.K., Chlebana, F., Cihangir, S., Cremonesi, M., Elvira, V.D., Fisk, I., Freeman, J., Gottschalk, E., Gray, L., Green, D., Grünendahl, S., Gutsche, O., Hare, D., Harris, R.M., Hasegawa, S., Hirschauer, J., Hu, Z., Jayatilaka, B., Jindariani, S., Johnson, M., Joshi, U., Klima, B., Kreis, B., Lammel, S., Linacre, J., Lincoln, D., Lipton, R., Liu, T., Lopes De Sá, R., Lykken, J., Maeshima, K., Magini, N., Marraffino, J.M., Maruyama, S., Mason, D., McBride, P., Merkel, P., Mrenna, S., Nahn, S., Newman-Holmes, C., O’Dell, V., Pedro, K., Prokofyev, O., Rakness, G., Ristori, L., Sexton-Kennedy, E., Soha, A., Spalding, W.J., Spiegel, L., Stoynev, S., Strobbe, N., Taylor, L., Tkaczyk, S., Tran, N.V., Uplegger, L., Vaandering, E.W., Vernieri, C., Verzocchi, M., Vidal, R., Wang, M., Weber, H.A., Whitbeck, A., Wu, Y., Acosta, D., Avery, P., Bortignon, P., Bourilkov, D., Brinkerhoff, A., Carnes, A., Carver, M., Curry, D., Das, S., Field, R.D., Furic, I.K., Konigsberg, J., Korytov, A., Low, J.F., Ma, P., Matchev, K., Mei, H., Mitselmakher, G., Rank, D., Shchutska, L., Sperka, D., Thomas, L., Wang, J., Wang, S., Yelton, J., Linn, S., Markowitz, P., Martinez, G., Rodriguez, J.L., Ackert, A., Adams, J.R., Adams, T., Askew, A., Bein, S., Diamond, B., Hagopian, S., Hagopian, V., Johnson, K.F., Khatiwada, A., Prosper, H., Santra, A., Yohay, R., Baarmand, M.M., Bhopatkar, V., Colafranceschi, S., Hohlmann, M., Noonan, D., Roy, T., Yumiceva, F., Adams, M.R., Apanasevich, L., Berry, D., Betts, R.R., Bucinskaite, I., Cavanaugh, R., Evdokimov, O., Gauthier, L., Gerber, C.E., Hofman, D.J., Jung, K., Kurt, P., O’Brien, C., Sandoval Gonzalez, I.D., Turner, P., Varelas, N., Wang, H., Wu, Z., Zakaria, M., Zhang, J., Bilki, B., Clarida, W., Dilsiz, K., Durgut, S., Gandrajula, R.P., Haytmyradov, M., Khristenko, V., Merlo, J.-P., Mermerkaya, H., Mestvirishvili, A., Moeller, A., Nachtman, J., Ogul, H., Onel, Y., Ozok, F., Penzo, A., Snyder, C., Tiras, E., Wetzel, J., Yi, K., Anderson, I., Blumenfeld, B., Cocoros, A., Eminizer, N., Fehling, D., Feng, L., Gritsan, A.V., Maksimovic, P., Martin, C., Osherson, M., Roskes, J., Sarica, U., Swartz, M., Xiao, M., Xin, Y., You, C., Al-bataineh, A., Baringer, P., Bean, A., Boren, S., Bowen, J., Bruner, C., Castle, J., Forthomme, L., Kenny III, R.P., Khalil, S., Kropivnitskaya, A., Majumder, D., Mcbrayer, W., Murray, M., Sanders, S., Stringer, R., Tapia Takaki, J.D., Wang, Q., Ivanov, A., Kaadze, K., Maravin, Y., Mohammadi, A., Saini, L.K., Skhirtladze, N., Toda, S., Rebassoo, F., Wright, D., Anelli, C., Baden, A., Baron, O., Belloni, A., Calvert, B., Eno, S.C., Ferraioli, C., Gomez, J.A., Hadley, N.J., Jabeen, S., Kellogg, R.G., Kolberg, T., Kunkle, J., Lu, Y., Mignerey, A.C., Ricci-Tam, F., Shin, Y.H., Skuja, A., Tonjes, M.B., Tonwar, S.C., Abercrombie, D., Allen, B., Apyan, A., Barbieri, R., Baty, A., Bi, R., Bierwagen, K., Brandt, S., Busza, W., Cali, I.A., Demiragli, Z., Di Matteo, L., Gomez Ceballos, G., Goncharov, M., Hsu, D., Iiyama, Y., Innocenti, G.M., Klute, M., Kovalskyi, D., Krajczar, K., Lai, Y.S., Lee, Y.-J., Levin, A., Luckey, P.D., Maier, B., Marini, A.C., Mcginn, C., Mironov, C., Narayanan, S., Niu, X., Paus, C., Roland, C., Roland, G., Salfeld-Nebgen, J., Stephans, G.S.F., Sumorok, K., Tatar, K., Varma, M., Velicanu, D., Veverka, J., Wang, J., Wang, T.W., Wyslouch, B., Yang, M., Zhukova, V., Benvenuti, A.C., Chatterjee, R.M., Evans, A., Finkel, A., Gude, A., Hansen, P., Kalafut, S., Kao, S.C., Kubota, Y., Lesko, Z., Mans, J., Nourbakhsh, S., Ruckstuhl, N., Rusack, R., Tambe, N., Turkewitz, J., Acosta, J.G., Oliveros, S., Avdeeva, E., Bartek, R., Bloom, K., Claes, D.R., Dominguez, A., Fangmeier, C., Gonzalez Suarez, R., Kamalieddin, R., Kravchenko, I., Malta Rodrigues, A., Meier, F., Monroy, J., Siado, J.E., Snow, G.R., Stieger, B., Alyari, M., Dolen, J., George, J., Godshalk, A., Harrington, C., Iashvili, I., Kaisen, J., Kharchilava, A., Kumar, A., Parker, A., Rappoccio, S., Roozbahani, B., Alverson, G., Barberis, E., Hortiangtham, A., Massironi, A., Morse, D.M., Nash, D., Orimoto, T., Teixeira De Lima, R., Trocino, D., Wang, R.-J., Wood, D., Bhattacharya, S., Charaf, O., Hahn, K.A., Kubik, A., Kumar, A., Mucia, N., Odell, N., Pollack, B., Schmitt, M.H., Sung, K., Trovato, M., Velasco, M., Dev, N., Hildreth, M., Hurtado Anampa, K., Jessop, C., Karmgard, D.J., Kellams, N., Lannon, K., Marinelli, N., Meng, F., Mueller, C., Musienko, Y., Planer, M., Reinsvold, A., Ruchti, R., Smith, G., Taroni, S., Wayne, M., Wolf, M., Woodard, A., Alimena, J., Antonelli, L., Brinson, J., Bylsma, B., Durkin, L.S., Flowers, S., Francis, B., Hart, A., Hill, C., Hughes, R., Ji, W., Liu, B., Luo, W., Puigh, D., Winer, B.L., Wulsin, H.W., Cooperstein, S., Driga, O., Elmer, P., Hardenbrook, J., Hebda, P., Lange, D., Luo, J., Marlow, D., Mc Donald, J., Medvedeva, T., Mei, K., Mooney, M., Olsen, J., Palmer, C., Piroué, P., Stickland, D., Svyatkovskiy, A., Tully, C., Zuranski, A., Malik, S., Barker, A., Barnes, V.E., Folgueras, S., Gutay, L., Jha, M.K., Jones, M., Jung, A.W., Miller, D.H., Neumeister, N., Schulte, J.F., Shi, X., Sun, J., Wang, F., Xie, W., Parashar, N., Stupak, J., Adair, A., Akgun, B., Chen, Z., Ecklund, K.M., Geurts, F.J.M., Guilbaud, M., Li, W., Michlin, B., Northup, M., Padley, B.P., Redjimi, R., Roberts, J., Rorie, J., Tu, Z., Zabel, J., Betchart, B., Bodek, A., de Barbaro, P., Demina, R., Duh, Y.T., Ferbel, T., Galanti, M., Garcia-Bellido, A., Han, J., Hindrichs, O., Khukhunaishvili, A., Lo, K.H., Tan, P., Verzetti, M., Agapitos, A., Chou, J.P., Contreras-Campana, E., Gershtein, Y., Gómez Espinosa, T.A., Halkiadakis, E., Heindl, M., Hidas, D., Hughes, E., Kaplan, S., Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R., Kyriacou, S., Lath, A., Nash, K., Saka, H., Salur, S., Schnetzer, S., Sheffield, D., Somalwar, S., Stone, R., Thomas, S., Thomassen, P., Walker, M., Delannoy, A.G., Foerster, M., Heideman, J., Riley, G., Rose, K., Spanier, S., Thapa, K., Bouhali, O., Celik, A., Dalchenko, M., De Mattia, M., Delgado, A., Dildick, S., Eusebi, R., Gilmore, J., Huang, T., Juska, E., Kamon, T., Mueller, R., Pakhotin, Y., Patel, R., Perloff, A., Perniè, L., Rathjens, D., Rose, A., Safonov, A., Tatarinov, A., Ulmer, K.A., Akchurin, N., Cowden, C., Damgov, J., De Guio, F., Dragoiu, C., Dudero, P.R., Faulkner, J., Gurpinar, E., Kunori, S., Lamichhane, K., Lee, S.W., Libeiro, T., Peltola, T., Undleeb, S., Volobouev, I., Wang, Z., Greene, S., Gurrola, A., Janjam, R., Johns, W., Maguire, C., Melo, A., Ni, H., Sheldon, P., Tuo, S., Velkovska, J., Xu, Q., Arenton, M.W., Barria, P., Cox, B., Goodell, J., Hirosky, R., Ledovskoy, A., Li, H., Neu, C., Sinthuprasith, T., Sun, X., Wang, Y., Wolfe, E., Xia, F., Clarke, C., Harr, R., Karchin, P.E., Sturdy, J., Belknap, D.A., Caillol, C., Dasu, S., Dodd, L., Duric, S., Gomber, B., Grothe, M., Herndon, M., Hervé, A., Klabbers, P., Lanaro, A., Levine, A., Long, K., Loveless, R., Ojalvo, I., Perry, T., Pierro, G.A., Polese, G., Ruggles, T., Savin, A., Smith, N., Smith, W.H., Taylor, D., Woods, N. 2017 Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics ,
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1
4 . Increased recovery of touch DNA evidence using FTA paper compared to conventional collection methods Kirgiz, I.A., Calloway, C. 2017 Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine ,
47 pp. 9 – 15 .
5 . Threat-related amygdala activity is associated with peripheral CRP concentrations in men but not women Swartz, J.R., Prather, A.A., Hariri, A.R. 2017 Psychoneuroendocrinology ,
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6 . A comparative study of signal transformation techniques in automated spectral unmixing of infrared spectra for remote sensing applications Singh, K.D., Ramakrishnan, D. 2017 International Journal of Remote Sensing ,
38 ( 5 ) pp. 1235 – 1257 .
7 . Abdominal adhesions: A practical review of an often overlooked entity Tabibian, N., Swehli, E., Boyd, A., Umbreen, A., Tabibian, J.H. 2017 Annals of Medicine and Surgery ,
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8 . Unraveling the contact patterns and network structure of pig shipments in the United States and its association with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) outbreaks Lee, K., Polson, D., Lowe, E., Main, R., Holtkamp, D., Martínez-López, B. 2017 Preventive Veterinary Medicine ,
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9 . Neurologic Examination of the Ruminant Fecteau, G., Parent, J., George, L.W. 2017 Veterinary Clinics of North America – Food Animal Practice ,
33 ( 1 ) pp. 1 – 8 .
10 . The contraceptive efficacy of intravas injection of Vasalgel™ for adult male rhesus monkeys Colagross-Schouten, A., Lemoy, M.-J., Keesler, R.I., Lissner, E., VandeVoort, C.A. 2017 Basic and Clinical Andrology ,
27 ( 1 ) , art. no. 4
11 . Uncovering hidden variation in polyploid wheat Krasileva, K.V., Vasquez-Gross, H.A., Howell, T., Bailey, P., Paraiso, F., Clissold, L., Simmonds, J., Ramirez-Gonzalez, R.H., Wang, X., Borrill, P., Fosker, C., Ayling, S., Phillips, A.L., Uauy, C., Dubcovsky, J. 2017 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America ,
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13 . Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Cognitive Trajectories in a Diverse Longitudinal Cohort Meyer, O.L., Mungas, D., King, J., Hinton, L., Farias, S., Reed, B., DeCarli, C., Geraghty, E., Beckett, L. 2017 Clinical Gerontologist ,
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14 . Lateralization of ERPs to speech and handedness in the early development of Autism Spectrum Disorder Finch, K.H., Seery, A.M., Talbott, M.R., Nelson, C.A., Tager-Flusberg, H. 2017 Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders ,
9 ( 1 ) , art. no. 4
15 . Tolerance for audiovisual asynchrony is enhanced by the spectrotemporal fidelity of the speaker’s mouth movements and speech Shahin, A.J., Shen, S., Kerlin, J.R. 2017 Language, Cognition and Neuroscience ,
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16 . Complete genome sequence of Jiangella gansuensis strain YIM 002<sup>T</sup> (DSM 44835<sup>T</sup>), the type species of the genus Jiangella and source of new antibiotic compounds Jiao, J.-Y., Carro, L., Liu, L., Gao, X.-Y., Zhang, X.-T., Hozzein, W.N., Lapidus, A., Huntemann, M., Reddy, T.B.K., Varghese, N., Hadjithomas, M., Ivanova, N.N., Göker, M., Pillay, M., Eisen, J.A., Woyke, T., Klenk, H.-P., Kyrpides, N.C., Li, W.-J. 2017 Standards in Genomic Sciences ,
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18 . A Comprehensive Examination of Reading Heterogeneity in Students with High Functioning Autism: Distinct Reading Profiles and Their Relation to Autism Symptom Severity McIntyre, N.S., Solari, E.J., Grimm, R.P., E. Lerro, L., E. Gonzales, J., Mundy, P.C. 2017 Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders ,
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19 . Barbiturates bind in the GLIC ion channel pore and cause inhibition by stabilizing a closed state Fourati, Z., Ruza, R.R., Laverty, D., Drège, E., Delarue-Cochin, S., Joseph, D., Koehl, P., Smart, T., Delarue, M. 2017 Journal of Biological Chemistry ,
292 ( 5 ) pp. 1550 – 1558 .
20 . Diversity analysis of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm using the CottonSNP63K Array Hinze, L.L., Hulse-Kemp, A.M., Wilson, I.W., Zhu, Q.-H., Llewellyn, D.J., Taylor, J.M., Spriggs, A., Fang, D.D., Ulloa, M., Burke, J.J., Giband, M., Lacape, J.-M., Van Deynze, A., Udall, J.A., Scheffler, J.A., Hague, S., Wendel, J.F., Pepper, A.E., Frelichowski, J., Lawley, C.T., Jones, D.C., Percy, R.G., Stelly, D.M. 2017 BMC Plant Biology ,
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21 . ABRF Proteome Informatics Research Group (iPRG) 2015 Study: Detection of Differentially Abundant Proteins in Label-Free Quantitative LC-MS/MS Experiments Choi, M., Eren-Dogu, Z.F., Colangelo, C., Cottrell, J., Hoopmann, M.R., Kapp, E.A., Kim, S., Lam, H., Neubert, T.A., Palmblad, M., Phinney, B.S., Weintraub, S.T., MacLean, B., Vitek, O. 2017 Journal of Proteome Research ,
16 ( 2 ) pp. 945 – 957 .
22 . Association of DPP-4 activity with BMD, body composition, and incident hip fracture: the Cardiovascular Health Study Carbone, L.D., Bůžková, P., Fink, H.A., Robbins, J.A., Bethel, M., Isales, C.M., Hill, W.D. 2017 Osteoporosis International ,
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Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
23 . Dynamics of Co-Infection with Bartonella henselae Genotypes I and II in Naturally Infected Cats: Implications for Feline Vaccine Development Huwyler, C., Heiniger, N., Chomel, B.B., Kim, M., Kasten, R.W., Koehler, J.E. 2017 Microbial Ecology ,
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24 . The Fecal Microbial Community of Breast-fed Infants from Armenia and Georgia Lewis, Z.T., Sidamonidze, K., Tsaturyan, V., Tsereteli, D., Khachidze, N., Pepoyan, A., Zhgenti, E., Tevzadze, L., Manvelyan, A., Balayan, M., Imnadze, P., Torok, T., Lemay, D.G., Mills, D.A. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 , art. no. 40932
25 . Small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements containing different amounts of zinc along with diarrhea and malaria treatment increase iron and vitamin A status and reduce anemia prevalence, but do not affect zinc status in young Burkinabe children: A cluster-randomized trial Abbeddou, S., Yakes Jimenez, E., Somé, J.W., Ouédraogo, J.B., Brown., K.H., Hess, S.Y. 2017 BMC Pediatrics ,
17 ( 1 ) , art. no. 46
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Emerald celebrates 6th annual High Usage Awards
Academic publisher Emerald Publishing is celebrating the top 20 international academic institutions with the highest downloads of its eJournal content for the 6th consecutive year. The Emerald High Usage Awards celebrate the relationship between Emerald and each winning institution; all of which have access to a growing collection of over 300 journals covering business and management research
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Cardiff University to use OCLC Sustainable Collection Services to redefine library collections
OCLC has announced that Cardiff University, one of Britain’s leading research universities, will use OCLC Sustainable Collection Services (SCS) to analyze and inform decisions about consolidating print collections in preparation for a move to a new purpose-built library in a few years. Collectively, Cardiff University Libraries hold approximately 1.3 million catalogued items. A collection of 595,000 print monographs will form the basis of this analysis.
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Frontiers in Medicine launches new specialty section – Translational Medicine
Frontiers in Medicine has launched a new specialty section – Translational Medicine. The section is led by Prof. Hans-Dieter Volk, Director of the Institute for Medical Immunology at the Medical Faculty (Charité) of Humboldt University, Berlin and Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT). Prof. Volk’s key research area is clinical immunology, specifically the immunology of infection, transplantation regenerative medicine and allograft rejection.
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The BMJ Awards 2017 finalist announced
Medical knowledge provider BMJ has announced that more than 60 healthcare teams from across the UK have made it to the final judging stages for The BMJ Awards 2017. Now in its ninth year, The BMJ Awards is organised by The BMJ, one of the world’s leading medical journals. This year’s awards attracted 290 entries across 14 categories, with three new categories: imaging, surgery, and mental health.
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SMU Libraries Join HathiTrust
SMU Libraries are now among the newest members of HathiTrust. SMU faculty, students, and staff now have access to in-copyright works and additional text mining tools as part of the new membership in the HathiTrust Digital Library. As a digital repository for the nation’s great research libraries, HathiTrust brings together the immense collections of partner institutions.
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Leading the News

Trump Orders To Roll Back Emissions, Water Rules.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20, Eilperin, Mufson) reports President Trump is preparing two executive orders that “will send an unmistakable signal that the new administration is determined to promote fossil-fuel production and economic activity even when those activities collide with some environmental safeguards.” According to unnamed sources, the first order will instruct the EPA to begin rewriting limits on greenhouse-gas emissions from existing electric utilities and will instruct BLM to immediately lift a moratorium on federal coal leasing. The second order will instruct the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers to revamp the Waters of the United States rule, which restricts waterways development as well as some farming operations that impact smaller or intermittent bodies of water.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Dlouhy) reported that opponents say that the changes would mark a reversal in the role the US plays internationally on climate change. John Coequyt, global climate policy director for the Sierra Club, said, “If Trump does follow through, it would mean he is declaring open season on our air, water and climate while further destabilizing our role in the world.”

Higher Education

College Students Take Part In Johns Hopkins Hackathon.

The Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19) reports that teams of students from colleges across the US competed in Johns Hopkins University’s biannual HopHacks hackathon event on Sunday, building “software to help people seek out money lenders from remote parts of the world, even if they can’t read or write. An app that uses technology known as augmented reality to help the elderly fix their printers or log into their Facebook accounts. A program that maps out President Donald Trump’s personal connections through an analysis of news articles.” The Sun explains that a hackathon is en event “in which engineers compete to build the most inventive and useful software applications over a sleep-deprived, Red Bull-fueled weekend.”

Illinois Program Aims To Keep Local Minority STEM Students Close To Home After Graduation.

The Springfield (IL) State Journal-Register Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20) runs a piece on the Grow Our Own Minority Participation Program, a partnership between engineering firm Hanson Professional Services, the city of Springfield, Illinois, and Sangamon County, which “started three years ago in the midst of debates about minority hiring for Springfield’s rail Consolidation Project.” The piece profiles Nick Moore, a Southern Illinois University Edwardsville engineering graduate from Springfield who “says he probably wouldn’t have returned to Springfield after college if not for his internship with the local firm that he found through the Grow Our Own Minority Participation Program.”

From ASEE
Engineering Research Council Meeting
Register now for this event, where ASEE members delve into the federal research funding world, hearing directly from staff at NSF, NIH, DoD, and others. This short video explains why attendance is valuable.

Start Smart with “Smart Start”
Researchers and innovators will want to be in this FREE, two-week course to improve STEM education in both formal and informal settings, at all levels. The course kicks off at the ASEE Annual Conference in June. Learn more and apply here.

NEW Report on Engineering Technology Education
The report, from the National Academy of Engineering, was written with the input of several ASEE members. It is available online for free.

Research and Development

DHS Funds Projects Aimed At Countering DDoS Cyberattacks.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Chalfant) reports on new research being funded by the Department of Homeland Security to counter distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, of the type that “brought down Twitter, PayPal and other websites last year.” Several projects with this goal were announced Thursday by the agency’s Science and Technology Directorate. Cybersecurity research project Daniel Massey said, “The goal of the DDoS project is to build effective and easily implemented network defenses and promote adoption of best practices by the private sector to bring about an end to the scourge of DDoS attacks.”

West Virginia University Researchers Developing Portable Wearable PET Scanner.

The Springfield (MA) Republican Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19) reports that West Virginia University Assistant Professor Julie Brefczynski-Lewis is working on expanding on the wearable electronic trend by creating what she and her research team call “the world’s first portable, wearable positron emission tomography (PET) scanner that obtains ‘live’ internal depictions of the human brain working while a person walks or is involved in other physical movement.” Researchers say the technology “holds great promise for looking deeper and more completely into an active human brain, potentially paving the way for advancements in understanding and, eventually, curing brain-based ailments ranging from Parkinson’s disease to dementia.” The researchers unveiled the technology at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.

Clemson Researchers Looking To Improve Dosimeters.

The Greenville (SC) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/18) reports that Clemson University researchers are investigating “electronic traps that are found in materials used for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation.” Luiz Jacobsohn, the assistant professor in Clemson’s Department of Material Science and Engineering who is leading the work, says that the research “could mean a future with safer medical imaging, tighter national security and even more efficient lighting.” The project involves research on dosimeters, “which measure the amount of accumulated ionizing radiation absorbed, and scintillators, which display luminescence, or light, when exposed to ionizing radiation.”

Pentagon Program Lets Students Design Military Tech.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19, Gregg) reports that while the US military “usually develops its advanced technology in classified labs staffed by gigantic defense companies,” a DOD program called Hacking for Defense (H4D) “is a graduate school course designed to let students invent new products for the military. Students without security clearances — including some foreign nationals — are put to work on unclassified versions of real-world problems faced by military and intelligence agencies.” The program was piloted at Stanford University last spring, and is expanding to at least 12 other schools.

For-Profit Schools Seeing A Resurgence Under Trump.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20, Cohen, Subscription Publication) reports that “for-profit college companies have been on a hot streak” as “officials in Washington who spearheaded a relentless crackdown on the multibillion-dollar industry have been replaced by others who have profited from it.” Education Secretary DeVos “is an ardent campaigner for privately run schools and has investments in for-profit educational ventures.”

NYTimes A1: NYU Announces Plans To Help Students Cut Cost By Graduating Sooner.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, A1, Harris, Subscription Publication) reports on its front page that New York University on Friday announced a number of measures to help undergraduates complete their education in less than four years, which the Times says is “part of an initiative aimed at diminishing the university’s enormous affordability problem.” According to the head of the university’s affordability steering committee Ellen Schall, the school already graduates about 20 percent of its undergraduates ahead of schedule. She said, “We were surprised. …That’s part of what convinced us we needed to make this more transparent and more available to more students.” This includes an effort to increase 2-credit coursework to help fill credit gaps in what students pay for and “will also allow many students to transfer in up to eight credits from other schools.”

Georgia Researchers Suggest Proactive Interventions Increased College Graduation Rates.

Georgia State University researchers “spent four years analyzing students’ grades, test scores and other information in order to identify those in potential trouble, and promptly assisted them,” the AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20) reports. The researchers claimed their proactive interventions helped increase the school’s graduation rate by 30 percent. The study’s principal investigator, GSU enrollment management and student success vice president Timothy Renick, called the gains “really encouraging” and added, “Because of these proactive interventions all students benefited, but the students who benefited the most were first generation, low-income and students of color.” ED awarded Renick with “a four-year $8.9 million grant that will significantly expand his study,” and Renick launched a project last year that “will involve 10,000 low-income and first generation students at Georgia State and 10 other large public research universities.”

AP Analysis Details Universities’ Use Of Private Planes.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20) compiles information it requested “from dozens of public universities and found that at least 20 own or share ownership of planes for school business, often employing a few full-time pilots to fly them.” Furthermore, many other universities “charter private flights through outside companies.” Colleges are increasingly using private planes to “try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations.” The universities said despite the costs of the private planes, the practice enables efficient and effective travel for officials, coaches, and administrators. Yet, Center for College Affordability and Productivity director Richard Vedder criticized the trend. “The students are paying for it or the taxpayers are paying for it, and it’s usually the students,” Vedder explained. Some schools, such as Ohio State, apply private donations and athletic revenue to cover the costs of the flights. Many other public universities, however, allocate the costs in “budgets that include tuition and tax dollars.”

Maryland HBCUs Join Coalition Partnering With DOE To Advance Research In Energy.

The Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20, Prudente) reports Coppin and Morgan state universities and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore “have joined a national coalition of historically black colleges” working with the Energy Department “to foster joint research projects, student internships and expanded access to solar power.” Last month “the coalition signed a memorandum of understanding” with DOE “to request grant funding for research projects.” In addition, the agreement is “intended to help increase the number of graduates from historically black colleges who work in science, technology, engineering and math.” In a statement Morgan’s vice president for research and economic development Victor McCrary said, “This coalition opens the door for an era of cooperation among the HBCUs and the Department of Energy.”

Workforce

NYTimes Analysis: Oil Companies Hire Fewer, Higher-Skilled Employees.

According to the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19, Krauss, Subscription Publication), the crash in oil prices led companies to adopt remote and automation technologies that have led to a 30 percent drop in oil jobs from the 2014 peak. Oil companies rely on a smaller workforce with skills in data analysis, computer science, mathematics, robotic design, and communications. New technologies make activities such as drilling, finding leaks, and checking tank levels possible from remote locations and put data quickly in the hand of expert analysts, changes that have led to increased safety and production.

Uber Hires Former AG Holder To Probe Sexual Harassment Claims.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20) reports that Uber Technologies Inc has hired former Attorney General Eric Holder “to conduct a review of sexual harassment claims at the ride-hailing service made by a former employee.” Holder and Tammy Albarran, both partners at the law firm Covington & Burling, “will look into the complaints about a manager at Uber, as well as general questions about diversity and inclusion, Chief Executive Travis Kalanick told his employees in a memo on Monday.” Reuters notes that last year, Airbnb hired Holder “to help craft a policy to combat discrimination occurring through the online lodging service’s platform.”

Industry News

President Trump Celebrates American Manufacturing At Boeing 787-10 Unveiling.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Phillip, Ehrenfreund) reported that President Trump attended a ceremony on Friday marking the unveiling of the Dreamliner 787-10 at Boeing’s South Carolina facility, during which he vowed to “fight for every last American job” and to dedicate his administration to defending US manufacturing. President Trump said, “We’re here today to celebrate American engineering and American manufacturing. … We’re also here today to celebrate jobs. Jobs!” Similarly, CBS News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Sherter) reported that Trump “touted Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner as a sign of a manufacturing resurgence in the U.S.” CBS added that Boeing’s shares jumped 1.1 percent on Friday after Trump’s visit. The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Boak) reported Trump “proudly referenced the evolution of airplanes as proof of U.S. competitiveness” and “hailed it as a sign of steps toward generating more U.S factory jobs.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Thrush, Subscription Publication) reported that Trump embraced the “photo op” in front of the new jetliner, and “could not have chosen a more impressive backdrop to emphasize his commitment to preserving jobs.” Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Mason) reported that although the President has “feuded” with Boeing, he “gave a ringing endorsement to the company” as he “used the event to highlight his pitch to boost homegrown job growth,” and praised the aircraft as “an amazing piece of art.”

Trump Suggests Potential Large Purchase Of F/A-18s. Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Talev, Johnsson) reported that Trump also “suggested that a larger purchase of Boeing Co.’s F/A-18 Super Hornet may be in the offing.” He said, “We are looking seriously at a big order,” but acknowledged Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg “is a tough negotiator.” USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Jackson, Jansen) noted that the President “has threatened to buy F-18 fighters because the rival F-35 Joint Strike Fighter from Lockheed Martin was too expensive.” However, Trump told reporters on Friday the cost of the F-35 program had been “out of control,” but “now it’s very much in control.’”

Engineering and Public Policy

“Hundreds” Attend Protest Against Trump’s Science Policies.

The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19, Ransom, Guerra) reports from Boston that “hundreds of people attended a rally in Copley Square Sunday in a call to fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science.” The protest “coincided with a gathering of thousands of scientists in Boston for the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting at the Hynes Convention Center.” The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19, Mooney) says those in attendance demanded “that the Trump administration accept empirical reality on issues such as climate change and highlighting the centrality of objective information to making policy.” The Post adds, “As these were scientists marching, the event naturally featured some colorful signs, reading ‘Objective Reality Exists,’ ‘Make America Smart Again,’ and ‘Poetry Nerds for Science.’” The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19, Calfas) notes that “some” of the protesters were “wearing white lab coats.”

Sportsmen Groups Working With Environmentalists Against Opening More Public Lands To Energy Development.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Volcovici, Knox) reports “Outdoor sporting groups” and “liberal environmentalists” are cooperating in opposition to moves to transfer federal lands to state ownership, and President Trump’s “push to open more public lands to energy development.” Reuters says that Backcountry Hunters and Anglers and the Outdoor Alliance both have been given large grants from “liberal foundations” mentioning the Turner Foundation and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Reuters points out that Donald Trump Jr., is “a lifetime member” of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers.

Army Corps Of Engineers Ends Environmental Study On Dakota Access Pipeline.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/17, Nicholson) reports the Army Corps of Engineers Friday “formally ended” its “environmental study” of the Dakota Access pipeline crossing beneath Lake Oahe in North Dakota, a reservoir on the Missouri River. The study was started January 18 in response to “concerns from the Standing Rock Sioux and other Native American tribes.” Energy Transfer Partners, which received permission to make the crossing February 8, has said the pipeline may be operational in March.

WPost Analysis: Scientists Concerned Trump Administration May Cut Research Funding.

A Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/18, Mooney) analysis examines concerns of scientists that the Trump Administration may cut back on science research. The Heritage Foundation has proposed to eliminate the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, which the Post says would be a “major blow to renewable energy research.” Comparing these fears to some raised during the Bush Administration, the piece also points out that research funding was not cut back then. On Sunday, some of these scientists will march in Copley Square, Boston in an event dubbed “a rally to stand up for science.”

NYTimes Analysis: Nuclear Power Has “Murky Future” In US.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/18, Cardwell, Subscription Publication) reports on the “murky future of nuclear power in the United States” pointing out that while there had been plans “for a new atomic age, in part to help tame a warming global climate,” those plans now may be at “an end, capped in recent days by Toshiba’s decision to take a $6 billion loss and pull Westinghouse…out of the construction business.” The Times points out that “only the Tennessee Valley Authority, itself a government corporation, has been able to bring a new nuclear reactor into operation in the last 20 years.”

Thune: GOP Will Approach Internet, Driverless Car Regulation With “Light Touch.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/19, Kang, Subscription Publication) publishes an edited interview with Senator John Thune, chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, in which he discusses the Republican-led Congress’ moves to address Obama-era tech policies. Thune says lawmakers are looking to scale back FCC overreach of classifying the Internet as a utility and approach regulation with a “light touch.” He also favors having the FCC to take action first to encourage Democrats to increase GOP-led legislation and streamlining broadband privacy rules. Ensuring the Universal Service Fund that subsidizes Internet connection for low-income families is efficiently run and decreasing barriers to driverless cars are also important goals, says Thune.

Elementary/Secondary Education

Carnegie Mellon University Hosts Inaugural “Explore Engineering!” Festival.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/20) reports Carnegie Mellon University hosted its inaugural “Explore Engineering!” festival on Sunday. Thousands of students in grades K-12 gathered for “an afternoon of hands-on demos and interactive activities designed to expose kids to a variety of engineering disciplines.” The Engineering Research Accelerator impacts program at Carnegie Mellon College of Engineering “does a lot of programs to share its research with the community, and is equally committed feeding the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) pipeline at the elementary, middle school and high school level with more hands-on, inquiry-based learning.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier features award-winning integrated clinical decision support solutions at HIMSS17
STM publisher Elsevier will showcase its Integrated Clinical Decision Support solutions at booth #2961 at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2017 annual meeting in Orlando, Fla, Feb. 19-23. A leader in bringing evidence-based content into the care process, Elsevier focuses on encouraging quality, enhancing efficiency and improving outcomes – providing empowering knowledge that enables action at the point of care.
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Thomson Reuters appoints Shawn Malhotra VP, Toronto Technology Centre
Thomson Reuters has announced that Shawn Malhotra has been appointed Vice President of the new Thomson Reuters Toronto Technology Centre. In this role, Shawn will help drive the centre’s focus on emerging skills such as cognitive computing, visualization, user experience and cloud development.
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Thieme appoints Caroline Birkle as Managing Director of Thieme Chemistry
Medical and scientific publisher Thieme has announced that effective April 1, 2017, Caroline Birkle will assume full responsibility for Thieme Chemistry as Managing Director. Under her direction Thieme Chemistry will continue to expand its publishing program that provides chemists in research, science and industry with highly evaluated specialist information on synthetic, organic and general chemistry.
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FH Münster now live with OCLC’s cloud-based WorldShare Management Services
OCLC and the library of Münster University of Applied Sciences have announced that FH Münster is now live with OCLC’s cloud-based WorldShare Management Services (WMS). FH Münster’s decision last March to adopt WMS as its library management system was followed by a period of preparation and training. The migration from SISIS-SunRise to the new system began in mid-December, and the library was able to begin operations with WMS on schedule in January.
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New Cochrane Scientific Committee to strengthen scientific integrity and oversight of methodological practice within Cochrane
Cochrane has announced the launch of the inaugural Cochrane Scientific Committee which will strengthen the scientific integrity and oversight of methodological practice within Cochrane. This important Committee will support the Editor in Chief and the work of Methods and Cochrane Review Groups, as well as colleagues working in the Centres and Fields across the world.
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Prof. Samuel B. Adeloju named Editor-in-Chief of the Applied Chemistry Section
Academic open-access publisher Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) has announced the appointment of Prof. Samuel B. Adeloju as Editor-in-Chief of the Applied Chemistry Section of the Applied Sciences journal. His appointment started in January 2017. Prof. Adeloju is a Professor of Chemistry at the Monash University (Australia) and a Visiting Professor of Sensors and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia).
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Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Joseph Esposito (Monograph Output of American University Presses, 2009-2013); Matthew Guest (Increasing REF’s impact weighting could offer incentive for institutions to address societal, economic and global challenges); Angelina Giordano (The academic journal detectives behind Retraction Watch); Phill Jones (Why Hindawi Left the STM Association and What It All Means for the Industry); and Joe Wikert (Which digital book format has the most growth potential?). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

London Book Fair announces dedicated scholarly publishing conference programme
The London Book Fair has announced its dedicated academic publishing conference, The Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum to be held at Kensington Olympia, March 15. Speakers from Wiley, Elsevier and Taylor & Francis are among the prestigious names participating in LBF’s The Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum in 2017.
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Elsevier publishes updated version of Foodborne Diseases and announces four additional food science books
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of an updated version of Foodborne Diseases, edited by Christine Dodd, Tim Aldsworth and Richard Stein. The foundational reference offers a practical understanding of diseases to help researchers and scientists manage foodborne illnesses and prevent and control outbreaks. Also, Elsevier has announced four additional food science books.
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Wiley ChemPlanner selected as one of five LAUNCH Innovators
Wiley ChemPlanner has been selected as one of the five LAUNCH: Smarter Chemistry Innovation Challenge Innovators. LAUNCH was founded by NASA, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. Department of State and NIKE, Inc. The LAUNCH: Smarter Chemistry Challenge aims to identify the most innovative technologies that shift problem solving in chemistry away from the traditional model and towards data-driven, predictive design.
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Wolters Kluwer moves 175 customers and migrates nearly 1M procedure notes from EndoWorks to ProVation MD
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced that its roster of EndoWorks conversions to ProVation MD® for Gastroenterology (GI) continues to grow exponentially in advance of Olympus’ departure from the endowriter market. Among the 175 healthcare organisations that moved from EndoWorks to Wolters Kluwer’s gastroenterology structured reporting software in 2016 was Tampa General Hospital, whose 25 GI physicians are benefiting from streamlined documentation and accelerated workflows.
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Loughborough University London receives research funding from UKIERI for development of healthcare Internet of Things platform
Loughborough University London has been awarded research funding from the UK-India Education Research Initiative (UKIERI) to build a secure Internet of Things (IoT) platform for use in healthcare. IoT platforms connect devices, allowing them to collect and use data. Examples include smart fridges that alert owners when food supplies are running low or thermostats that learn about heating habits in the home in order to conserve energy.
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NISO publishes updated version of ResourceSync Framework Specification
The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has announced the formal publication of an updated version of the ResourceSync Framework Specification (ANSI/NISO Z39.99-2017). Approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), this 1.1 revision improves a web standard that details various capabilities that a server can implement to allow third-party systems to remain synchronised with evolving resources.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Trump Signs Measure Ending Stream Protection Rule.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Natter) reports President Trump signed legislation repealing the Stream Protection Rule under the Congressional Review Act. “In eliminating this rule I am continuing to keep my promise to the American people to get rid of wasteful regulations,” Trump said at a White House signing ceremony. The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(2/16, Henry) reports the rule “is among the most controversial environment regulations” of the Obama administration and the coal industry “said it would be costly to implement and lead to job losses across the sector.”

The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Wolfgang) reports that “the legislation has at least some bipartisan support.” West Virginia Democrat Sen. Joe Manchin was “present at Thursday’s event and has urged Mr. Trump to roll back Obama-era regulations on the coal industry.”

Meanwhile, CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that the rule “would have caused relatively few layoffs within the industry and created nearly as many new jobs, according to a government report.” The Congressional Research Service “found the rule would reduce coal-related employment by an average of 260 jobs a year.” CRS also “projected the rule would generate an average of 250 jobs a year,” and “some of the new jobs would be in high-skilled areas like engineering and biology.”

Higher Education

ED Recommends Renewal For Embattled Accreditor.

Inside Higher Ed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that ED is recommending that the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity renew its recognition of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, “a controversial regional accreditor of two-year colleges in California and other Western states.” NACIQI is scheduled to review its recognition of the accreditor next week. ED, the piece reports, “had given the accreditor a year to fix several problems, including concerns about the consistency of its decision making, acceptance of its policies by academics and others, and its adherence to due process in the accreditation process.” The piece notes that the accreditor came under a cloud over its “longstanding feud over sanctions it imposed on City College of San Francisco. But last month the accreditor renewed City College’s accreditation for seven years.”

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that the decision to accredit CCSF ended “a five-year legal and political battle over the fate of the college and its more than 60,000 students.” However, “the long-simmering controversy over” ACCJC “is coming to a head. The accreditor’s fate will once again be on the line when a federal accreditation panel considers it next week.”

Physics Professors: Trump Should Prioritize Investment In Science To Boost Economy.

In a New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Subscription Publication) op-ed, CUNY Professor Michael Lubell and Stanford Professor Burton Richter argue that President Trump needs to boost federal support for long-term scientific research in order to keep pace with global competitors. Lubell and Richter say the President should surround himself with competent scientific advisers and fully populate science and technology-focused government agencies in order to address three main science and technology opportunities that would boost the economy: making science infrastructure part of the proposed national infrastructure revival program, using corporate tax reform to fund a nonprofit research endowment, and making “major investments in clean energy research.”

Bob Jones University To Regain Tax-Exempt Status.

The Greenville (SC) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Cary) reports that Bob Jones University “says it will regain its federal tax-exempt status on March 1, more than three decades after the IRS stripped its nonprofit ranking following a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling.” The issue in the court case “was the university’s refusal to allow interracial dating or marriage among students, staff or faculty of the university, a rule it has since abandoned.” The “conservative Christian” university “dropped its interracial dating ban in a nationally televised interview with past president Bob Jones III on CNN in 2000,” and in 2008, “past president Stephen Jones, great-grandson of evangelist and university founder Bob Jones, apologized for the school’s past racial discrimination,” but the university “didn’t seek to reinstate its tax-exempt status until 2014 after Steve Pettit took over as the fifth president in the school’s 90-year history.”

From ASEE
Engineering Research Council Meeting
Register now for this event, where ASEE members delve into the federal research funding world, hearing directly from staff at NSF, NIH, DoD, and others. This short video explains why attendance is valuable.

Start Smart with “Smart Start”
Researchers and innovators will want to be in this FREE, two-week course to improve STEM education in both formal and informal settings, at all levels. The course kicks off at the ASEE Annual Conference in June. Learn more and apply here.

NEW Report on Engineering Technology Education
The report, from the National Academy of Engineering, was written with the input of several ASEE members. It is available online for free.

Research and Development

Researchers Develop High-Tech Mosquito Trap.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Neergaard) reports that researchers have developed a new high-tech robotic mosquito trap which “is promising to catch the bloodsuckers while letting friendlier insects escape — and even record the exact weather conditions when different species emerge to bite.” The piece reports that in recent tests, the traps “accurately captured particular mosquito species — those capable of spreading the Zika virus and certain other diseases — that health officials wanted to track, researchers reported Thursday” at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston. The piece reports that Microsoft lead researcher Ethan Jackson said “the traps act like ‘a field biologist in real time that’s making choices about the insects it wants to capture.’”

San Diego State University Researchers Develop New Electrodes For Use With Spinal Cord Injuries.

The Times of San Diego Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that San Diego State University researchers announced Thursday that they “have developed a new generation of electrodes that can take brain signals and prompt limb movement in people suffering from spinal cord injuries.” The piece explains that SDSU, the University of Washington, and MIT have formed the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, which has developed glassy carbon electrodes that “could lead to an improved implantable brain chip that records neural electrical signals and transmits them to receivers in the limb, bypassing the damage and restoring movement.”

Winners Announced For NASA’s “Space Poop Challenge.”

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Guarino) reports that on Wednesday, the winners were announced for the NASA-backed “Space Poop Challenge,” hosted on crowdfunding platform HeroX. For the challenge, NASA sought ideas for better ways to contain human waste in space suits. Retired US Air Force Col. Thatcher R. Cardon, a physician, won the $15,000 first-place prize for his small airlock designed to expel waste while protecting the suit’s oxygen supply. While “none of these technologies will necessarily be directly implemented,” Kirstyn Johnson, a NASA engineer specializing in space suit technology, said in a news release that “we’ll be able to use aspects of the winning designs to develop future waste management systems.”

Michigan State University Team Develops Stretchable OLED Technology.

PC World Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Hachman) reports researchers at Michigan State University have created “a printable OLED circuit within a stretchable material,” opening the possibility for smart fabrics, wearables, or truly foldable displays. Chuan Wang, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at MSU, led the design team to the development and will now work on “[combining] those elements into a working pixel, the foundation for a flexible display,” a process which should only take between one and two years. The stretchable material Wang’s team created can also “be printed with an ordinary inkjet printer, helping to keep manufacturing costs down.” Furthermore, the MSU technology is seemingly different from current patents for foldable displays, like Samsung’s OLED which “was still built upon inelastic materials, whereas” Wang says his smart fabric “could be folded and placed in a pocket without breaking.”

MIT Reveals Development Plan For Volpe Center In Kendall Square.

The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Logan) reports the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Thursday revealed its “first vision” for the development of the Volpe Center in Kendall Square. The university’s plans include “more than 1,000 apartments and condos, offices and stores across eight new buildings.” However, MIT Investment Management Co.’s first construction project on the grounds will be a new research facility for the US Department of Transportation.

Workforce

Alexa Could Take Over IT Management.

A piece from Venture Beat Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) yesterday questioned whether at some point in the near future, Al-based assistants such as Alexa could one day be used to displace standard IT roles. According to VB, in lieu of employing human personnel for some IT management positions – particularly in monitoring and troubleshooting – machine learning tools could instead take over basic IT responsibilities and thereby refocus engineering and development teams on improving other areas such as product and service delivery.

Occidental Growing After Refusing To Layoff Workforce In Downturn.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports Occidental Petroleum’s strategy during the market downturn was to hold onto talent by putting young engineers to work supervising drilling rigs, replacing outside contractors. Now that the market has started to rebound, Occidental is in a position to ramp up quickly and take advantage as their competitors who laid off a large amount of workers scramble to convince people to come back. Occidental felt that companies resort too quickly to layoffs in times of crisis, and that taking a longer view helps to retain talent and engender loyalty in its workforce. To weather the downturn, the company cut capital spending, capped bonuses and sold land holdings, but it committed to keeping employees at work. New hires were sent to work on projects that would expand their knowledge and skills, while veteran employees worked on ways to help the company operate more efficiently.

Tech Industry’s Concerns Over Lack Of Skilled US Workers May Be Unfounded.

Decode DC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that not every is “buying” the tech industry’s argument that cutting back on H-1B visas “would restrict their access to the world’s best and brightest and blunt their competitive edge.” The article say the industry has argued “there’s a shortage of high-skilled workers in the US because not enough students are graduating with science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) degrees.” Yet, Rutgers University technology education expert Hal Salzman is cited as saying there is a lack of proof to back up this claim that the US is lacking in skilled workers. In reference to tech companies, he said, “I mean it’s the height of hypocrisy… they’re laying off workers and yet claiming they can’t find people.”

Industry News

Analysts Expect iPhone 8 To Feature 5.8-Inch Flexible Display, Facial Recognition Technology.

BGR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports a new research note from Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo indicates the new iPhone 8 will likely be the same size as the 4.7-inch iPhone 7 but will offer a display with 5.15 inches of usable space. In other words, the new screens will have barely-there bezels on the sides and top of the display, while the bottom of the device is rumored to feature a “function area” that will “presumably be similar to in utility to the Touch Bar on Apple’s recently released MacBook Pro.” Phone Arena Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports Kuo also claims the iPhone 8 will feature a wrap-around, flexible OLED panel, which will bring the display surface area to 5.8 inches with 2800 x 1242 resolution. A second article from Phone Arena Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports JPMorgan analyst Rod Hall’s projection seems to line up with Kuo’s that Apple is doing away with the Touch ID Home Button, claiming the iPhone 8 will incorporate a 3D laser scanner for facial recognition.

The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) and 9 to 5 Mac Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) also provide similar coverage of this story.

Engineering and Public Policy

New Coalition Calls For More Federal And Private Infrastructure Dollars.

Engineering News-Record Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Ichniowski) reports on the new Coalition to Modernize American Infrastructure which was launched on Feb. 13 and includes the National Association of Manufacturers, the US Chamber of Commerce, and the Business Roundtable, among others. In announcing the Coalition to Modernize American Infrastructure’s launch, former US House Majority Leader Eric Cantor “told reporters that U.S. infrastructure needs total an estimated $3.3 trillion” and “that the coalition members believe that ‘it is essential that the momentum for an infrastructure solution continue.’” In addition, the coalition “states that a new infrastructure program must include private-sector investment.”

Report: More Than 55,000 US Bridges Are Deficient.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Halsey) reports that according to the “yearly American Road and Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) report on bad bridges,” which is set to be released Wednesday, 55,710 bridges nationwide “were found to be deficient.” The FHA “estimates an annual investment of $20.5 billion is needed over the next 16 years to repair and replace bridges.” The Post adds that while “the number of bridges needing repair dropped by 2,785 last year…at that pace of improvement it will be a generation before the last needy bridge is addressed.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

CEO Responds To Seven-Year-Old Girl Who Wants To Work At Google.

The Christian Science Monitor Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that after asking her father where he would most like to work, British seven-year-old Chloe Bridgewater learned about “the slides and beanbag chairs” at Google’s offices. “Chloe then put pen to paper and wrote herself an application, in the form of a letter addressed to ‘Dear Google boss,’ to send to the massive corporation.” The Monitor says the girl’s “impressive résumé caught the attention of Google chief executive Sundar Pichai, who personally responded to Chloe’s letter four days later.”

Local Robotics Team Heading To State Championships.

The North Jersey (NJ) Media Group Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that the high school robotics team in Wayne, New Jersey is set to compete in the state championships in the coming weeks, noting that this year’s competition is dubbed the “Velocity Vortex,” and “tasks robots with pushing and tossing wiffle-like balls into goals for points on a 12-foot playing field. Robots must also activate beacons lining the field and can cap the rotating vortex with a large ball for a point bonus.”

Colorado High School Hosts FIRST Competition State Qualifier.

The Rifle (CO) Citizen Telegram Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16) reports that students from seven Colorado high schools met at Coal Ridge High School last Saturday “to compete in the ‘For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology’ (FIRST) Tech Challenge.” The state qualifier “served as an innovative way for the students to connect with peers from across Garfield County as they learned new skills by playing with robots.”

Northern Illinois University Holds Star Wars-Themed STEM Outreach Event.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Barrows) reports that Northern Illinois University recently held a STEM Outreach program based on the Star Wars films. One student was able to “program her own droid, marvel at 3-D images through a hologram projector and create her very own lightsaber.” The article relates the stories of a number of local elementary school students describing their enthusiasm for science and technology, and quotes local STEM educator Jeremy Benson saying, “‘Star Wars’ is a big thing culturally right now. Everyone loves ‘Star Wars,’ and we’re using the allure of it to get kids thinking about STEM fields.”

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Thursday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier restores journal access to 60 German institutions
STM publisher Elsevier has reportedly announced that it would restore journal access to German universities after being blocked for over a month now. Negotiations, however, continue between the company and DEAL, a consortium of institutions calling for a nationwide license.
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Wiley-VCH announces the release of the 5th Edition of MPW Spectral Library
Wiley-VCH, part of the scientific and technical publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc., has announced the release of the 5th Edition of the Maurer/Pfleger/Weber (MPW) spectral library for clinical and forensic toxicologists. The Mass Spectral Library of Drugs, Poisons, Pesticides, Pollutants and their Metabolites, 5th Edition, is an indispensable tool for compound identification and has been extensively updated with 1,780 new data sets containing new compounds, their metabolites and derivatives.
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Springer Healthcare launches new medical education website, Medicine Matters
Springer Healthcare, part of the Springer Nature group, has launched Medicine Matters, a new medical education website. The content-rich portal will provide physicians and healthcare professionals with a reliable, free source of medical education, designed to promote best clinical practice and improved health outcomes.
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Wolters Kluwer releases cloud-based Reference Data Management solution within its Health Language platform
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced the release of a cloud-based Reference Data Management (RDM) solution within its Health Language® platform. The new RDM offering provides the data management infrastructure needed to establish a single source of truth, enable interoperability, and optimise analytics for regulatory and value-based programs.
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BMJ appoints Dr. Declan Walsh as new editor in chief of BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
Medical knowledge provider BMJ has announced Dr. Declan Walsh, an internationally recognised medical oncologist and innovator, as the new editor in chief of BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. Dr Walsh joined BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care in January 2017 and will lead the journal, including its editorial board of top experts, to produce high quality content across many disciplines and specialties in supportive and palliative care.
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Ingenta announces landmark collaboration with CEPIEC in China
Ingenta has signed an agreement with China Educational Publications Import & Export Corporation Ltd (CEPIEC), which will enable publishers on Ingenta Connect to market and sell their content to Chinese researchers and institutions. The two year deal with China’s largest academic digital resource importer will provide international publishers who host their content on Ingenta Connect with access to the burgeoning Chinese scholarly market via a new scholarly pay-per-view platform, launched by CEPIEC and major Chinese search engine Baidu.
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Unbound Medicine and APSA launch Pediatric Surgery Library
Unbound Medicine, a provider of knowledge management solutions for healthcare, and the American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) have launched the Pediatric Surgery Library – the premier digital resource for pediatric surgical education, training, and research. In the past, pediatric surgeon authors would spend hours recording their knowledge and expertise in book chapters that were published once a decade by commercial publishers. The Pediatric Surgery Library was created as an alternative – to be current, affordable, and accessible on any device.
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Copyright Clearance Center announces enhancements to RightFind XML for Mining
Global licensing and content solutions provider Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC) has announced enhancements to its cloud-based RightFind® XML for Mining software solution, which empowers organisations using text mining to glean important insights from vast amounts of scientific, technical, and medical (STM) content. XML for Mining is built on CCC’s RightFind® platform, which helps customers access, share and manage content anytime, anywhere, while respecting copyright.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Crews Still Racing To Repair Oroville Dam Ahead Of Rainstorms.

According to ABC World News Tonight (2/15, story 5, 1:25, Muir), emergency crews are racing to reinforce the Oroville Dam’s emergency spillway, bringing in 1,200 tons of material per hour, as approaching rainstorms threaten to require renewed evacuation. ABC reported that lake levels have fallen 20 feet since Sunday, resulting in areas 30 miles downstream being covered in several feet of water. Permanent repair of the structure may cost up to $200 million.

American Rivers President: “Work With Nature, Not Against It.” In a Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) op-ed, American Rivers President and Chief Executive William Robert Irvin writes that the Oroville Dam emergency only emphasizes that dams and levees are neither effective nor economical ways to address flood threats. By allowing rivers “more room, not less,” Irvin argues, many benefits will result: improved public safety, clean water, open recreation space, and wildlife habitat. While the immediate priority is the safety of those threatened by the Oroville Dam emergency, Irvin recommends the Administration and Congress adopt long-term infrastructure plans to “work with nature, not against it.”

WSJournal: Building Up Infrastructure Should Come Before Climate Action For California. The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Subscription Publication) editorializes that California’s Democrat-led government has failed to provide the state with sufficient infrastructure to deal with weather fluctuations. According to the Journal, the recent excess precipitation has pushed California’s largest reservoirs to near capacity, but the state Legislature has stalled efforts to expand its surface storage for years despite it being relatively affordable compared to other projects. In addition to financing Oroville Dam repairs with state funds, Governor Jerry Brown should focus on current infrastructure needs instead of climate change predictions, writes the Journal.

Higher Education

US News Looks For Clues On How DeVos Will Approach Federal Student Loans.

U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Mayotte) reports that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has made little mention of her possible higher education policy plans, but suggests that “DeVos’ written answers to the almost 1,400 questions she received from senators leading up to her confirmation hearing” could contain some clues. A number of Senators “started their series of higher education-related questions by asking about DeVos’ intent on preserving the Direct Loan program, as opposed to reinstating some type of private lender-funded federal student loan program, which existed up until 2010.” DeVos “answered these questions generally by stating that, if confirmed, she looks forward to discussing these issues as part of the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.” The piece suggests that this “noncommittal answer” means that “because she admittedly has no experience in the student loan policy arena, she is unwilling to commit to a position on these issues before vetting them fully.”

Groups Release Papers Arguing Against Letting Private Lenders Back Into Student Loan Business.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Douglas-Gabriel) reports that while there has been rising enthusiasm for “bringing private lenders back into the federal student loan program” since President Trump took office, “a pair of new papers argue it is not a solution to problems with the loan program.” The piece quotes the American Enterprise Institute resident fellow Jason Delisle, the author of one of the papers, saying, “People want to go back to this because they think it has something to offer over the current direct loan program. But if you look at their motivation, there is a lot of confusion and a lot of misinformation about how the program worked.” While “opponents of direct federal lending say banks could do a better job” if the government returned to the old Federal Family Education Loan program, Delisle counters that “the $60 billion program was private in name only as it relied on government spending and operated under the government’s terms.”

Diverse Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) reports that Delisle’s paper argues that “if private lenders are allowed back into the federal student loan program — a program from which they were removed during the Obama administration under the Affordable Care Act of 2010 — it would preclude ‘universal access to student loans at universal terms.’” Delisle’s paper “comes at a time when questions abound about whether the administration of President Donald J. Trump and a Republican-controlled Congress will seek to revert to the bank-based system that President Barack Obama and a Democratic-controlled Congress scrapped back in 2010.”

Two Dozen Yemeni Students In US Face Uncertain Future.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Brown) reports two-dozen Yemeni students who “left their families in Yemen nearly three years ago through an exchange program that aimed to introduce Muslim high school students from overseas to America” face an uncertain future. The students remained indefinitely in the US after a “civil war broke out at home, [and] they couldn’t return.” The State Department, which has “sponsored the program and has supported these two dozen students since they arrived in 2014,” notified the students that “they’ll be on their own in a few months.” State Department spokesman Nathan Arnold “said the agency made what arrangements it could to allow the students to stay in the country two years after their initial program ended.” The State Department “has sought to ensure that the students understand their options for the future, he said.”

Students Increasingly Using Crowdfunding To Raise Money For College.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) reports that “more students are turning to GoFundMe online fundraising campaigns to raise money for college costs,” noting that in Illinois alone, “about $2.6 million has been raised since 2014 from nearly 5,300 campaigns to assist with tuition, housing and other higher education expenses.” Over 130,000 such campaigns nationwide “have raised $60 million from over 850,000 donations for college tuition and related expenses” during the past three years.

From ASEE
Engineering Research Council Meeting
Register now for this event, where ASEE members delve into the federal research funding world, hearing directly from staff at NSF, NIH, DoD, and others. This short video explains why attendance is valuable.

Start Smart with “Smart Start”
Researchers and innovators will want to be in this FREE, two-week course to improve STEM education in both formal and informal settings, at all levels. The course kicks off at the ASEE Annual Conference in June. Learn more and apply here.

NEW Report on Engineering Technology Education
The report, from the National Academy of Engineering, was written with the input of several ASEE members. It is available online for free.

Research and Development

DARPA Planning To Demonstrate Drone Swarm Technology.

The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Ernst) reports that DARPA “is planning a demonstration for late 2018 that will prove to the world that it can blanket the globe with versatile drones.” The agency is funding “Phase III of its Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node (TERN) project,” which “will give officials the ability to launch long-range, high-endurance operations from anywhere in the world.” TERN “will use vertical launch drones with offensive and defensive capabilities from over 100 small deck helicopter-capable ships.”

NASA Seeks Expedited Timetable For Crewed Deep Space Missions.

According to the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Chang, Subscription Publication), NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot announced at a Wednesday conference the agency’s interest in adding a crew to the first flight of the Space Launch System for deep space missions. In a memo released to NASA employees, Lightfoot also acknowledged that increased research and preparations would push back the crew-less launch which was scheduled for late 2018 and said the mission likely would be shorter. Contractors Boeing and Lockheed Martin issued statements of support for accelerating the timetable for crewed missions.

Huawei Developing Its Own Digital Assistant Technology To Take On Big Competitors.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Gurman) reports, citing “people familiar with the matter,” that Huawei Technologies Co. is has “A team of more than a hundred engineers is in the early stages of developing” a digital assistant technology. The “extensive” efforts “are aimed at” the likes of Apple, Amazon, Google, “not smaller players.” Bloomberg says the assistant will use Chinese, targeting the domestic market, where the move “may help Huawei devices stand out” as “many Google services that come with the dominant Android smartphone operating system are blocked.” Beyond China, Huawei “will continue to work with Google and Amazon’s Alexa service.” Bloomberg adds that Huawei “trails only Apple and Samsung Electronics Co. in global smartphone shipments as it pushes upmarket with premium features.”

Vigilant Tests UAV Avoidance System At NASA Armstrong.

Aviation Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Fuller) reports that Vigilant Aerospace has announced that it successfully tested its “FlightHorizon detect-and-avoid collision avoidance system” for UAVs in over 100 encounters at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. For the 18 different collision scenarios, two DJI Phantom 4 UAVs were used, with one acting as the intruder. The FAA’s senior UAV regulator and an FCC representative observed the tests.

Workforce

Spotify Announces NYC Office Relocation, 1,000 New Jobs.

Spotify’s announcement that it will relocate its Manhattan office and add 1,000 jobs has received heavy coverage from financial, music, and local New York City press. The Wednesday announcement was made with New York City Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who also unveiled a curated playlist to mark the occasion. According to the Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Morris, Subscription Publication), Spotify said it plans to move its office from Chelsea to Four World Trade Center, for which it will receive up to $11 million in rent-reduction credits from the state. Horacio Gutierrez, general counsel at Spotify, is quoted saying that the company decided to remain in the city due to the access it provides to a diverse talent base. “This is in many significant ways the media capital of the world,” Gutierrez is quoted saying.

Gutierrez said the new jobs will be focused on areas including engineering and marketing, Billboard Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Schneider, Gensler) reports. “We will bring more diversity and a whole lot of music to the area. … I hope that Spotify’s expansion sends a message to the tech community that NYC is open for business,” he is quoted saying. AM New York Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Pereira) quotes Gutierrez as saying: “Where in the world can you really find the technological talent and the richness of the music tradition in New York?”

Global Developments

Basic Energy, Vintage Engineering Partnering On Renewable Energy Projects.

The Philippine Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/16, Rivera) reports that in a Wednesday disclosure, Basic Energy announced that it has entered into a subscription agreement with Thai-based Vintage Engineering Public Co and will sell shares to VTE in line with an agreement to develop renewable energy projects. Basic Energy senior vice president and general manager Anthony Cuaycong said, “The price is yet to be determined and will be finalized upon the signing of the subscription agreement. There will be two or three tranches.” He added, “VTE is interested in the gamut of Basic’s projects. Likewise, Basic is in discussion with VTE regarding the latter’s own projects.”

Industry News

GM Discusses Potential Sale Of Opel To Peugeot.

CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Meredith) reports Evercore ISI analysts predict General Motors could be prepared to sell Opel, its European division, to PSA Group for around $1 billion. Although European car sales are at a nine-year high, carmakers have shown difficulty drawing profit, as evidenced by Opel’s more than $15 billion losses since 2000. Evercore analysts believe that GM was retaining the “European operations to allow it to develop compact cars and diesel engines.” But global demand for diesel is rapidly declining, setting the stage for GM “to benefit from a potential split with Europe.” The deal is attractive to GM according to Eversore because “and if we equated a sale price of PSA paying up to $1 billion to GM, it would be the equivalent of 6-8 times the potential earnings of a restructured GME.” Speaking on a Bloomberg Markets: European Open Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) segment, Evercore ISI analyst George Galliers speculates on why Peugeot would be interested in acquiring Opel, questioning the company’s motives. Galliers states Peugeot CEO Carlos Tavares “may see some near term gains” in “opportunities for synergies on capex, R&D, and also white collar jobs.” Tavares may also believe that incremental scale is what PSA currently needs to compete among emerging technologies.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Colias, Subscription Publication) attributes Opel’s decline to a growing consumer rejection of passenger cars. Low fuel prices have shifted consumer demand toward SUVs for which American engineers are recognized. Although several models, including redesigned Opel Astra and Chevrolet Malibu, have been showing decent sales, GM executives said selling more sedans harms overall margins in critical regions. The Opel-PSA deal might “indicate GM is further stepping back” from passenger vehicles according to RBC Capital Markets analyst Joseph Spak.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) reports General Motors CEO Mary Barra assured employees Wednesday that combining Opel and Vauxhall with Peugeot would benefit both companies. She also encouraged “employees not to let speculation about Opel’s fate distract the carmaker from” focusing on the proposal. Barra said, “While there can be no assurance of any agreement, any possible transaction would enable PSA Groupe and Opel Vauxhall to leverage their complementary strengths, enhancing their competitive positions for the future in a rapidly changing European market.” According to the Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Boston, Kostov, Subscription Publication), her comments come as the sale faces political resistance in Germany over the imminent job cuts through the deal. Barra and GM President Dan Ammann flew to Germany to meet with Opel’s management and representatives in attempt to assuage some concerns.

Engineering and Public Policy

Boeing Calls On Congress To Streamline FAA Certification Process.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Zanona) reports that at a congressional hearing on Wednesday, a top Boeing official called on lawmakers to streamline the FAA’s foreign certification process when they reauthorize the agency later this year. Manufacturers have “long lamented” that validating FAA-certified airplanes with foreign authorities takes too long, undercutting profits and competitiveness. Boeing Vice President of Engineering for Commercial Airplanes John Hamilton told a House Transportation and Infrastructure subcommittee that validation should “be quick and efficient,” but can take as long as 14 months. He cited that for the company’s 737 MAX, Boeing and the FAA must seek approval from the governments of each of the 43 countries where companies have ordered the plane. Committee ranking member Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) suggested that foreign certification is “the number one issue” raised by the industry.

Solar Largest Source Of New Capacity In US.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Martin) reports a record 14.6 gigawatts of solar capacity was added to US grids in 2016, almost double the total from 2015 and “enough to make photovoltaic panels the largest source of new electric capacity for the first time.” According to a report Wednesday from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association, solar accounted for 39 percent of new generation last year, beating natural gas (29 percent) and wind (26 percent). The San Jose (CA) Mercury News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Hansen) and the Triad (NC) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Subscription Publication) also report.

Utilities Will Still Pursue Clean Energy Even Without Clean Power Plan.

ClimateWire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15, Subscription Publication) reports that utilities continue to plan to reduce carbon emissions even as the EPA’s Clean Power Plan “seems doomed under the Trump administration.” Speaking on the sidelines of the NARUC meeting this week, Arkansas Public Service Commission chairman Ted Thomas said, “If [Republicans in Congress] don’t get it together, we’re going to have a different administration in four years, and that’s when folks might wish they had the Clean Power Plan” as the following administration may seek a stricter plan. Thomas explained that most of the price risk of the CPP would have come in the second half of the next decade anyway. Speakers at the conference said the oil and gas and renewables will create jobs, but none were optimistic outlook for the coal sector. Jonathan Weisgall, at Berkshire Hathaway Energy Weisgall said corporate demand, technological advances, aggressive state policies and remaining federal tax incentives will all drive carbon reductions, as will a “customer-driven pull,” rather than a “mandate-driven push.”

Handy: Power Sector Coal Use Could Rise Without Clean Power Plan. Randy Handy writes for the San Antonio Express-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) that without the Clean Power Plan “fewer coal-fired power plants will be retired and additions to renewable energy capacity will drop.” Handy cited an EIA report stating, “In the scenario where the Clean Power Plan is not implemented, coal again becomes the leading source of electricity generation by 2019 and retains that position through 2032.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Ohio Governor’s Budget Proposal Would Cut Funding To State’s CTE Schools.

The Canton (OH) Repository Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/14) reports that Ohio CTE schools “soon could be feeling the squeeze of Ohio’s tightening purse strings,” noting that 35 of 49 such schools in the state “would receive less state funding next year under Gov. John Kasich’s proposed 2018-19 budget.” The state’s Office of Management and Budget says most of these cuts are related to reduced enrollment.

Tennessee Elementary School Team Wins First-Place In State LEGO Tourney.

The Greeneville (TN) Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) reports that the “‘Block Jocks’ of Hal Henard Elementary School returned with a first-place trophy from the First LEGO League state competition in Cookeville this past weekend.” The school’s team topped rivals “in the category of ‘Innovative Solution’ for a research project undertaken as part of the First LEGO League challenge.”

UMass Dartmouth Professor Gets NSF Grant To Help Improve STEM Teacher Training.

The New Bedford (MA) Standard-Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) reports the National Science Foundation has given UMass Dartmouth Associate Professor of STEM Education and Teacher Development Walter Stroup a “$457,755 grant to develop new strategies for middle school and high school teachers to excite their students about science, technology, engineering and math careers.” Stroup and his team “envision classrooms where students engage in collaborative problem solving projects — untangling traffic jams or mapping the potential spread of the Zika virus — using math and science skills and knowledge.”

The Providence (RI) Business News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (2/15) reports that the project “focuses on demonstrating the benefits of collaborative, cloud-based learning, in which students work in groups to solve real-world problems – from traffic jams to the spread of infectious diseases – using math and science skills.” The piece quotes Stroup saying, “Young people are curious, creative and social beings, so it only makes sense to get them into a hands-on problem solving endeavor with their peers. They will be motivated to learn the math and science needed to succeed in their mission.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

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