Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier wins eight PROSE Awards categories, including Award for Excellence, and nine honorable mentions
STM publisher Elsevier has announced that it has won top honours in eight 2016 PROSE Awards categories, including a PROSE Award for Excellence, and nine honourable mentions. The 40th annual PROSE Awards – the American Publishers Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence – were presented at the Association of American Publisher’s Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division Annual Conference in Washington, DC.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

ITHAKA S+R releases new report on costs of publishing scholarly monographs
AAUP heralds ITHAKA S+R’s publication of ‘The Costs of Publishing Monographs: Towards a Transparent Methodology.’ The study, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and conducted by Nancy Maron and Kimberly Schmelzinger, developed a ground-up, activity-based methodology for understanding the full cost of publishing high-quality university press monographs.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

European University Association publishes ‘Roadmap on Open Access to Research Publications’
European University Association (EUA) has published its ‘Roadmap on Open Access to Research Publications’ after an endorsement from the EUA Council at its meeting on January 29, 2016. The main objective of the roadmap is to assist universities in the transition to Open Access (OA). More broadly, it is the first step in a series of EUA initiatives aimed at addressing the implications of Open Science.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

New publishing platform to improve reproducibility of preclinical research
Championed by Amgen’s Senior Vice President for Research, Sasha Kamb, and former Editor-in-Chief of Science and F1000Research International Advisory Board member Bruce Alberts (University of California, San Francisco), the Preclinical Reproducibility and Robustness channel is open for everyone to publish and discuss confirmatory or non-confirmatory scientific research results. The channel will provide an environment for reinforcing the acceptability of being open about the results of researchers who are attempting to assess the robustness of major scientific findings, whether they are confirmatory or not.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

SHARE initiative to host preconference workshop and curate-a-thon at FORCE2016 Conference
The SHARE initiative is offering a preconference workshop and curate-a-thon on April 17 in Portland, Oregon, at the FORCE2016 Conference organised by FORCE11, which aims to improve knowledge creation and sharing by encouraging better use of new technologies. SHARE is building a free, open data set of research and scholarly activities across their life cycle in order to make such output widely accessible, discoverable, and reusable.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

National Library of Medicine unveils MedPix, a free online medical image database
The National Library of Medicine has announced the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Ingram Content Group announces leadership change
Ingram Content Group has named Pep Carrera as Chief Operating Officer of VitalSource Technologies Inc., Ingram’s leading educational platform company. Carrera will transition into this role from his current position as Chief Information Officer at Ingram. Kent Freeman, currently VitalSource’s COO, will move into a newly created strategic position at Ingram Content Group as Chief Strategy and Development Officer.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

ICIS launches Data Express, introduces two new data delivery options
ICIS, a trusted source of market intelligence for global chemical, energy and fertilizer markets, has enhanced its market intelligence delivery platforms with a new service, Data Express, which offers two options to make downloading and organising data easier for customers. Subscribers to ICIS can now choose to access their data via an application programming interface (API) streamed directly into their proprietary systems or via a Microsoft Excel plug-in, depending on which service best suits their business needs.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Obama To Propose Doubling Investment In Clean Energy.

President Obama used his weekly address  on Saturday to announce he will ask Congress to double the country’s investment in clean energy to $12.8 billion by 2021 as part of his upcoming budget proposal.

Bloomberg Politics  (2/6, Keane) reports Obama “wants to double US investment in clean-energy research and development, to $12.8 billion by 2021, as part of a broader commitment to curb the effects of climate change.” A White House fact sheet released on Saturday says the Administration is asking for “$7.7 billion in discretionary funding in fiscal 2017 to boost funding for the research at 12 federal agencies” and the amount would increase by 15 percent each year of the period.

USA Today  (2/6, Wolf) adds Obama’s proposal “is part of the historic ‘Mission Innovation’ agreement reached in November by world leaders in Paris.”

Higher Education

Maker Spaces Appear In Growing Numbers.

The New York Times  (2/5, Schwartz, Subscription Publication) reports on the growth of “tinkering” with “makers faires” and universities offering space for people to make things with 3D printers, laser cutters, and more traditional machinery. Students are said to be excited about it. The engineering department at Rutgers has a maker space, and one professor there says that American colleges have not been “so good at finding and nurturing people who…think with their fingers. The next Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, he said, are more likely to emerge from a maker space than a garage.”

Group To Offer Approaches To Controlling Cost Of Higher Education.

The Washington Post  (2/5, Mcfarland) reports on Entangled Solutions and Michael Horn, who likens universities to cable TV packages in which students pay for a great deal they do not need or want including “new dorms, administrative costs and sports stadiums.” Horn also argues that accreditation as it now exists “hampers innovative programs that could address the affordability issue.” The group is planning to release a report this summer to propose changes.

GE Grant To Aid MSU College Of Engineering.

The AP  (2/5) reports that General Electric is giving $200,000 to Michigan State University’s College of Engineering in order to update some space in a dorm that “is home to a program for engineering students that integrates academic programs with the place where they live.” GE says the new space will be “a place where student[s] can fine tune team-building skills.”

University Of California Boosts Recruiting Of Minority Students.

The Los Angeles Times  (2/5, Watanabe) reports on the efforts by the University of California to recruit more “African Americans and Latinos.” Last year, they “helped 12,000 students…learn how to prepare themselves to become competitive applicants, navigate the admissions process and access financial aid.” The university is expanding that program.

University Of Colorado Program Helps Undergraduates Learn To Compete For Graduate School Places.

The Denver Post  (2/8, Writer) reports on the University of Colorado’s Bachelor to Graduate, B2G, program, “that helps undergraduates prepare for graduate school starting their sophomore year.” The university pairs students “with a graduate-student mentor,” invites guest speakers, and generally helps students “understand what they need to do as undergraduates to be competitive graduate school candidates.”

University of Colorado And Michigan State Professors Rewrite General Chemistry Text.

The Boulder (CO) Daily Camera  (2/7, Kuta) reports on the work of University of Colorado biology professor Michael Klymkowsky and Michigan State University chemistry professor Melanie Cooper, who “have revamped the introductory chemistry course taken each year by thousands of undergraduates to make it more engaging and to help students think critically about science more broadly.” The work was supported by “a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation,” under which the book will be “provided to students for free.” MSU is using the new text for its general chemistry course that includes “students studying science, technology, engineering and math.”

From ASEE
International Association of Continuing Engineering Education
Call for papers for May 17-20 conference in Porto, Portugal. January 31 deadline.

Surmounting the Barriers
The joint NAE-ASEE report makes recommendations for breaking down long-identified barriers to diversity in higher education.

Research and Development

SunShot Grant To Help Research Problems Solar Energy Poses To Grid.

Tennessee Today  (2/3) reports on SunShot, “a U.S. Department of Energy research initiative that holds the potential to reshape the way we think about, gather and use solar energy.” The program “awarded a $2.3 million, 36-month project to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Engineering and its collaborators.” Asst. Prof. Yong Liu explained, “Our study will look at problems inherent to current photovoltaic power generation, its effect on the U.S. power grid frequency stability, and how to mitigate its effect in order to avoid large blackouts.”

INL Researchers Improving Grid Reliability For Critical Services.

The Idaho Falls (ID) Post Register  (2/5, Ramseth) reports that Idaho National Laboratory researchers are planning to use the lab’s microgrid testing facility in Idaho Falls to improve the energy reliability of the city’s electric grid. INL engineer Rob Hovsapian said they are researching how to “quickly island pieces of the grid in order to get the critical services up and running.”

The AP  (2/8) also covers this work by INL researchers.

New Flexible Ceramics Could Make Foldable Devices A Reality.

Popular Mechanics  (2/5, Bennett) reported that Eurekite, “a Dutch materials science startup company,” has created a new kind of “ceramic material that can bend and fold like paper” called “flexiramics,” which “can reportedly withstand heats of at least 1,200 degrees Celsius—about 2,190 degrees Fahrenheit.” The company says the material could replace plastic in electronics and, according to Popular Mechanics, could be used “to make foldable mobile devices a reality.”

Industry News

Large Firms Cutting Back On Capital Spending.

The Wall Street Journal  (2/7, Francis, Subscription Publication) reports large companies are cutting back on capital spending, and in some cases implementing layoffs amid slow industrial demand and the unpredictability of US consumers. The Journal cites the spending reductions and layoffs as an indication that executives are cautious as a strong dollar and slow growth in developing markets hinder foreign sales and the declining stock market and fears of a sluggish economy upset US investors and consumers.

Engineering and Public Policy

Salina Seeks To Boost Agricultural Technology.

The Los Angeles Times  (2/5, Mohan) reports that Salinas, California “is trying to reboot itself as the agricultural technology center” of the state, and “hopes to turn the sons and daughters of farmworkers…into coders for the next generation of data-driven, automated farming.” The town is working to improve its education and to build ag-tech startup companies.

Elementary/Secondary Education

California Educators Working On Next Generation Science Standards.

The San Diego Union-Tribune  (2/6, Maio) reports on science teachers in the Vista Unified that are developing “new science lessons that could have ripple effects across the nation.” That’s because they are “working on how to implement so-called ‘next generation science standards.’” Vista is one of 10 systems statewide working on the standards.

South Dakota Schools Sees Quadrupling Of Robotics Class Enrollment.

The Black Hills (SD) Pioneer  (2/7, Pearson) reports that at Lead-Deadwood High School, robotics “class sizes have more than quadrupled for the 2015-2016 school year,” from 14 to 61. Principal Tony Biesiot said, “The kids are into creating their own projects,” adding, “They can create, discover, and they’re using technology. I find myself going in there quite a bit to watch the kids and see what they’re building. Now they’re getting into drones.” Robotics instructor Duane Cunningham explained, “We go through all the LEGOs, program and build those robots. Then we go to VEX competition robots and the advanced kids compete, while the other kids build other robots.”

Penn Hosts Lego League Regional Championship.

Philly (PA)  (2/6, Burney) reports on the annual Lego League regional championship at the University of Pennsylvania where 48 teams competed. The teams, from middle schools, “used software and technology to build and program a Lego robot,” and were awarded “points based on how well their robot manipulated a tabletop obstacle course and completed missions or tasks.”

Science Competition Held At Duquesne.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette  (2/7, Boselovic) reports on the regional Pennsylvania Junior Academy of Science Competition at Duquesne University where “about 800 students presented projects and were judged on the basis of scientific thought, how their experiments were designed, their analysis, and how they presented their theory and results to a panel of judges.” In all, “about $5,000 in prize money” was awarded.

Also in the News

Inquiry Launched Into Construction Of Taiwanese Complex Toppled By Earthquake.

ABC World News (2/7, story 5, 0:25, Llamas) broadcast “new drone images” of the devastation in Taiwan caused by a 6.4-magnitude earthquake Saturday. At least 32 people have been confirmed dead at the time of the news segment. The majority of the deaths occurred at the Wei Guan Golden Dragon Tower apartment complex in Tainan. Another 100 are believed to be buried underneath the ruble.

The New York Times  (2/7, Bradsher, Subscription Publication) reports “sophisticated sensors” were “deployed at the site” of the 17-story residential building.

Meanwhile, CNN  (2/8, Berlinger, Wang, Ap) reports that the Taiwanese government has “ordered an investigation into the collapse” of the highrise building as “images emerged showing tin cans built into the walls of the toppled complex.” They “appear to have been used as construction fillers in beams.” One engineer says “using tin cans ‘for such purposes in construction was not illegal prior to September 1999, but since then styrofoam and formwork boards have been used instead.’”

Three-Dimensional Model Of Taiwan Disaster Posted Online. Mashable  (2/6) reports that the “devastation wrought by the earthquake in Taiwan early Saturday morning has been captured on video and in numerous photos, but a few locals have enhanced the world’s view of the disaster by posting a three-dimensional model of the scene.” Posted by “modelers from the National Cheng Kung University, the 3D construct of the Wei-guan Golden Dragon Building was made available on the Sketchfab 3D modeling community website just hours after the quake.” Indeed, the “3D model isn’t likely to help rescue workers to find them,” but it “will help many following the situation to understand and empathize with the victims as the story continues to unfold.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

Senate Democrats Block Energy Bill Over Flint Amendment.
Chopra’s Appointment To ED May Signal Improved Protections For Student Loan Borrowers.
Football Player May Wear 3D-Printed Brace On Game Day.
Increased Reports Of Sexual Harassment In STEM Fields Attributed To Growing Comfort.
Side Mirrors Could Soon Be Replaced By Cameras.
Lugar Says Shutting Down MOX Project Would Be “Catastrophic.”
Texas High School Students Engineer Prosthesis For Dog Missing Leg.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier announces 2016 list of China’s most cited researchers
STM publisher Elsevier has announced its 2016 list of China’s most influential researchers, which is now available online (http://tinyurl.com/jycfert). This is the second edition of Elsevier’s annual list of Most Cited Chinese Researchers, recognising 1,744 researchers in China across 38 different subject areas.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Dove Medical Press and Library Journal collaborate to launch year-long program exploring issues in Open Access
Open access publisher Dove Medical Press, in collaboration with Library Journal, has announced the launch of a year-long program exploring issues in Open Access. The program, which will be called Open Access in Action, will commence in February 2016. Part of Dove’s Open Outlook series, the program will run for an initial period of 12 months.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Wolters Kluwer releases complimentary Antimicrobial Stewardship Gap Analysis to help hospitals improve Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer has announced the release of a complimentary Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) Gap Analysis to help healthcare organisations evaluate and establish strategies for enhancing AMS programs in response to the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria. The tool helps teams identify the most appropriate starting point and implementation option for upgrading programs based on past accomplishments.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

SAGE Publishing and National Association of Hispanic Nurses announce publishing partnership
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has announced a partnership with the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN) to publish Hispanic Health Care International (HHCI). The quarterly journal disseminates the latest information on clinical practice, education, research and policy issues concerning the Hispanic/Latino population to address their current and future health needs.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

CHORUS members elect Board of Directors
Elections for the CHORUS / CHOR, Inc. Board of Directors were held at the organisation’s Annual Members Meeting on February 3, 2016, in Washington, D.C., further to the expiration of the Interim Board that has served CHORUS during its initial formation, just over 2 years after incorporation. CHORUS members gathered in person or by proxy to vote to elect the members of the Board of Directors.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

The Geological Society and ReadCube partner to enhance discoverability of scholarly journals and books
The Geological Society of London (GSL), a major international Earth science publisher, has announced a partnership with Boston-based publishing technology company ReadCube to index their scholarly journals and books with ReadCube’s Discover service. Over 20,000 articles are now searchable across ReadCube’s web, desktop, and mobile reading portals and also included in ReadCube’s search engines, related article feeds and popular recommendation engine.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Economic Geography announces new publishing partnership with Routledge
Economic Geography (EG), published on behalf of Clark University, has announced a new publishing partnership with Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. A top ranked journal in the Geography and Economic categories with a 2014 Impact Factor of 2.735, EG is a prominent and internationally recognisable journal in the field. The journal will join Routledge’s Geography journal list, adding prestige and lustre to what is already the market-leading programme.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Senate Democrats Block Energy Bill Over Flint Amendment.

After “lawmakers failed to agree on a $600 million amendment” to address the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, the New York Times  (2/5, A17, Davenport, Subscription Publication) reports, Senate Democrats “blocked action on a comprehensive energy bill that had drawn broad bipartisan support,” beating back two attempts to end debate on the bill. The votes “will delay, but not derail, the legislation,” the Times notes, adding that immediately following the votes, Senate Majority Leader McConnell said the bill’s authors “would work through the weekend to find a path forward on both the energy bill and the Flint aid amendment.” Similarly, Reuters  (2/4, Gardner) says negotiators are still hoping a compromise can be reached on the amendment, and Roll Call  (2/4, Lesniewski) reported in its “#WGDB” blog McConnell has “entered a motion to reconsider the vote, meaning it could be called again if an agreement is reached.”

Before the votes, the Huffington Post  (2/4, Barron-Lopez) reported that Senate Minority Leader Reid “delivered scathing remarks on the floor, accusing Republicans of abandoning the people of Flint.” The Washington Times  (2/4, Howell) says energy bill author Sen. Lisa Murkowski “said she tried to offer an amendment that provided $550 million to Flint – $50 million up front – but that it was spurned by Democrats.” Senate Majority Whip Cornyn said, “Our colleagues from Michigan refused to take yes for an answer,” arguing Democrats “were using ‘gamesmanship’ to make the GOP look heartless.”

EPA Targets Homes With High Lead Levels. The CBS Evening News (2/4, story 6, 2:10, Pelley) reported while the EPA said Thursday “that lead levels are dropping and home filters appear to be working,” that “isn’t true everywhere.” CBS (Diaz) added EPA agents are “targeting homes where lead levels remain stubbornly high.” Concern over “lead levels in children’s blood” remains high as state officials released data Thursday showing “2.5% of children have elevated blood lead levels,” compared to 2.1% last year at this time. EPA agents are “conducting tests at homes with the highest lead levels,” and officials said Thursday “they want every child in Flint under six years old tested for lead by April 1.”

Flint Crisis Prompts Calls To Overhaul Federal Lead And Copper Rule. The Wall Street Journal  (2/4, Mcwhirter, Maher, Calvert, Subscription Publication) says the Flint crisis is promoting calls to overhaul the Federal Lead and Copper Rule, which controls how utilities sample water for lead contamination. According to the Journal, an increasing number of experts say the rule underestimates the lead in many cities.

Higher Education

Chopra’s Appointment To ED May Signal Improved Protections For Student Loan Borrowers.

The Street  (2/4) reports that the lame-duck status of the Obama Administration means that “initiatives affecting federal student loans that require Congressional ascent may grind to a halt in 2016.” However, “the appointment of Rohit Chopra to the Department of Education (ED) may make a difference if he can bolster borrower protections in the current year.” The Street says Chopra “unexpectedly” left his position as student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau last year, saying he “was a vocal critic of for-profit colleges and the companies ED hired to service and collect federal student loans.” The piece speculates on how he will “shake up” ED, an “agency that he made the object of pointed criticism.” Under Secretary Ted Mitchell told ED employees in January that Chopra “had joined the Department in an undisclosed capacity.”

ED Rolls Out New Requirements For Accreditors.

Inside Higher Ed  (2/5) reports ED this week added to the new requirements for accreditors that it rolled out in November, saying the agency “has pushed more aggressive reforms to the accreditation process” and called on Congress “to drop its ban on imposing specific standards on accreditors.” The new requirements have to do with transparency regarding “sanctions the agencies slap on colleges, including the reason for those sanctions.” Moreover, ED “will require accreditors to separate their reporting of punitive actions against colleges from the other information they submit to the federal government.” The article quotes Under Secretary Ted Mitchell saying, “Agencies need to do more than certify that institutions make quality offerings available; they must gauge the extent to which the institutions actually help more students achieve their goals. And because of our belief in the importance of equal opportunity to learn and achieve, that means strong outcomes for all students, not just some.”

Georgia House Passes Bill That Gives More Credit For STEM Courses.

The AP  (2/3) reports the Georgia House passed a bill giving applicants to HOPE Scholarships applicants more credit for STEM courses. State representative Jan Jones says the bill, if passed, would encourage students to take more STEM class.

US News & World Report Rankings Declining In Influence.

The Washington Post  (2/4, Selingo) reports the US News & World Report’s college rankings are losing much of their past influence. The then-magazine created the rankings nearly 25 years ago and at their peak popularity were seen as an authoritative guide to American colleges, but in recent years their significance and importance to prospective college students has greatly declined. A recent survey of college freshmen found that the magazine’s rankings were not even a top 10 factor for the majority of students. Part of the decline is attributable to the proliferation of other rankings, such as the College Scorecard and those produced by many other news sources. The rankings’ importance have also declined because what college students are looking for in their institutions have changed as well.

George Washington University Applications Increase After Making Admissions Tests Optional.

The Washington Post  (2/4, Anderson) reports applications to George Washington University surged by 28% in their first admission cycle after they made college admissions test scores optional. George Washington has received over 25,000 applications for the class beginning college in 2016 compared to less than 20,000 last year, and about 20% of applicants did not submit test scores. With its new policy, the university says it received more applications from disadvantaged students, including applicants whose parents did not attend college and belong to racial minorities.

University Of Colorado Professor Changing The Way Science Is Taught.

On its website, NPR  (2/4, Kamenetz) reports University of Colorado Boulder is working to make science classes more interactive and more fun to improve the quality of instruction. The article highlights the work of Professor Steven Pollock whose research specialty is teaching science. In his research, Pollock has found that experiments and interactive lessons are more effective at teaching students science than traditional lectures. With his research in mind, Pollock created the Learning Assistant Program at the university, which trains college students in pedagogy so they can lead small groups of science class students using the methods that Pollock has found to be most effective. Some of the Learning Assistants in the program are now considering becoming science teachers.

From ASEE
International Association of Continuing Engineering Education
Call for papers for May 17-20 conference in Porto, Portugal. January 31 deadline.

Surmounting the Barriers
The joint NAE-ASEE report makes recommendations for breaking down long-identified barriers to diversity in higher education.

Research and Development

Football Player May Wear 3D-Printed Brace On Game Day.

CNET News  (2/4, Kooser) reports that injured NFL player Thomas Davis may play in Sunday’s Super Bowl game wearing a custom arm brace made by 3D printing company Whiteclouds. The company used a scan of Davis’ arm to design and engineer the brace, which was printed and lined with Poron XRD to “absorb shocks” and “protect from impacts,” CNET News reports. If he plays, Davis will be the first to wear 3D printed equipment in an NFL game.

UC Berkeley Researchers Develop Solar Energy Storage Innovation.

Green Car Congress  (2/4) reports that a research team at Berkeley University has developed a technique for “using separate materials for light absorption and carrier transport” in solar water splitting cells. The innovation alleviates poor charge carrier transport properties of metal oxides.

Workforce

Increased Reports Of Sexual Harassment In STEM Fields Attributed To Growing Comfort.

Vice  (2/4, Curry) reports that some women believe a recent “spate of sexual harassment allegations” made against prominent scientists is a sign that women are gaining more acceptance in STEM fields, so they feel more comfortable reporting such behavior. American Association of University Women Vice President of Government Relations Lisa Maatz says, “The culture is changing slowly as more women come into the field”, which allows more women to share incidents of inappropriate sexual harassment. The article also mentions efforts by the White House and ED’s Office of Civil Rights to crack down on sexual harassment.

Industry News

Side Mirrors Could Soon Be Replaced By Cameras.

The New York Times  (2/4, Quain, Subscription Publication) reports on efforts by engineers to eliminate side mirrors in cars in a bid to make them more aerodynamic and get rid of blind spots, using cameras.” Almost two years ago, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and Tesla Motors petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to allow video cameras to replace side mirrors,” the article reports. “Continental, a major parts and systems supplier to automakers, calls them digital mirrors,” the article adds. Dean McConnell, director of customer programs for advanced driver assistance systems at Continental said, “There’s significant noise reduction, and there’s potential for CO2 reduction because of reduced drag and improved fuel economy,” adding, “There’s also the increased field of view.” The article explains that “thumb-size video cameras on the exterior of the car replace the side-mounted mirrors and use interior screens on the left and right side of the dashboard to deliver views of what is next to and behind the car.”

Experts Raise Concern About Hackers Targeting Aircraft.

Flightglobal  (2/5, Hemmerdinger) reports that “though there have been no proven cases in which a passenger aircraft has been electronically commandeered by a hacker, experts note that at least one hacker claims to have done so.” Meanwhile, “other hackers have exposed security flaws in various aircraft systems, such as” aircraft communications addressing and reporting systems and automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. Flightglobal cites Marco Wolf, head of engineering and consulting at Escrypt, and colleagues Moritz Minzlaff and Martin Moser, who “co-wrote a 2015 paper about aviation cyber vulnerability, in which they highlight recent hackings and specific risks.” Meanwhile, the FAA and DOD have launched an 18-month study of aviation cybersecurity, and Susan Cabler, the FAA’s assistant manager of design, manufacturing, and airworthiness, has said the agencies are “seeking to acquire a passenger commercial aircraft, which they intend to ‘dissect’” in order “to see if there are cyber vulnerabilities that have not yet identified themselves.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Lugar Says Shutting Down MOX Project Would Be “Catastrophic.”

The Aiken (SC) Standard  (2/4, Asberry) reports former Sen. Richard Lugar said that shutting down the MOX facility at the Savannah River Site would be “catastrophic.” The former Republican senator spent yesterday “morning touring the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility – the main building in the MOX project that is expected to convert 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into commercial nuclear fuel.” The Standard says yesterday was also a “day of concern because of President Barack Obama’s budget rollout scheduled for Feb. 9.” Obama’s “proposal may include language to kill MOX and move forward with a downblending method that would dilute the plutonium and ship it to a repository.” The article adds that “plutonium disposition language in Obama’s Feb. 9 budget proposal will be influenced by a report spearheaded” by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.

The Augusta (GA) Chronicle  (2/4, Highfield) reports that last year Moniz “said it would require $1 billion annually to complete MOX, which, according to contractors, is about 70 percent finished.” Meanwhile, “others say life-cycle costs could reach $30 billion.” But Lugar said, “On a basis of my visit today and some research that I’ve done before, I think those figures are way out of line. … They really have no relationship to the actual cost that will be involved. But there really will be costs if we don’t get the job done.” The AP  (2/4, Kinnard) reports that Lugar warned that not completing MOX “gives the Russians an opportunity really to back out of the project.”

White House Tells SCOTUS Effort To Block Climate Rule Is “Unprecedented.”

The Hill  (2/5, Cama) reports officials in the Administration told the Supreme Court yesterday to deny an “extraordinary and unprecedented” request by Republican states to block the EPA’s new climate change rule. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli “accused the states…of trying to bypass the normal process for challenging the climate regulation, and said they haven’t demonstrated a strong case for why that should happen.” In a Thursday brief to the Supreme Court, Verrilli said, “Applicants seek a stay before any court has expressed a view about, let alone rendered a final decision concerning, the merits of their legal claims. … Applicants identify no case in which this court has granted a stay of a generally applicable regulation pending initial judicial review in the court of appeals.”

Krugman: Reductions In Greenhouse Gas Emissions Via Renewable Resources “Well Within Reach.”

Paul Krugman writes in his New York Times  (2/4) blog that his previous piece on the “prospects for a renewables revolution” turned out to be on target, citing a recent Bloomberg article reporting that solar and wind “accounted for two-thirds of the generation capacity added last year.” Krugman says, however, this is “not enough,” and the process of replacing coal-fired generation with renewable energy sources “needs to go much faster.” Replacing coal with natural gas could “in principle be a net positive” because it reduces carbon, but “in practice the leaks associated with fracking make that highly doubtful.” Nevertheless, Krugman says his point is that “dramatic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are well within reach.”

California Legislative Leaders Question Proposal To Expand Electric Grid.

The Los Angeles Times  (2/4, Penn) reports California legislative leaders expressed concern in a letter to Gov. Jerry Brown about a “proposal to expand the electric grid to include one of the largest users of coal-fired power plants in the west.” Senate President Kevin de Leon and House Speaker Anthony Rendon, both Democrats from Southern California, said in their letter that utility company PacifiCorp has a record of blocking clean energy innovation in favor of coal plants. The utility, owned by Berkshire Hathaway Energy, “recently forced hundreds and potentially thousands of Nevada workers out of a job by killing rooftop solar in the state.” The proposal to add the utility to California’s energy market, they state, could jeopardize the state’s efforts to address climate change and expand clean energy.

Santa Fe’s Mayor Advocates For Extending New Mexico’s Solar Tax Credit.

Sante Fe Mayor Javier Gonzales advocates for New Mexico extending the solar tax credit to all state residents in an op-ed for the Albuquerque (NM) Journal  (2/5). Gonzalez writes that “local communities like Santa Fe are proud to be at the forefront of the solar industry’s growth in New Mexico,” and calls for aligning “state and federal policies with these local priorities.” Only by working in concert will help New Mexico reach its “renewable energy portfolio goals by 2020 and Santa Fe’s goal of being carbon neutral by 2040.” Gonzalez also boasts about how the solar energy industry is bringing more jobs to the state and how the solar tax credit has “helped 5,500 families across the state install solar panels” since 2009. Considering it has one of the worst unemployment rates in the nation, “New Mexico must position itself to bring more of these jobs to our state.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Texas High School Students Engineer Prosthesis For Dog Missing Leg.

WRC-TV  Washington (2/4, Scott) reports a group of high school engineering students at Career Center East in Lewisville, Texas are “working to create a prosthetic leg for a 5-year-old Labrador named Macey.” The dog is owned by a staff member at the school, and lost its leg to cancer. The students have “spent the school year working through various different designs created specifically for the Labrador using 3D printing, as well as other materials.”

Arizona Lawmakers Considering Bills To Restore Most Of the Funding For Career And Technical Education.

The Arizona Republic  (2/4, Cano and Sanchez) reports Arizona state lawmakers introduced legislation in the House and Senate that would repeal $28 million of the cuts in state spending on career and technical education programs. Educators, students, and business leaders all called for the programs’ funding to be restored after being cut by nearly $30 million in a budget deal last year.

Iowa Middle School Students Learn About Cybersecurity At School Club.

Daily Nonpareil (IA)  (2/5, Stewart) reports students at Kirn Middle School in Pottawattamie County, Iowa are learning about cybersecurity through a school club. Anthony Kava, a local IT professional that works for the county sheriff’s department, meets with students every week to teach them about cybersecurity. Kava says the club gives students practical skills and also teaches them about professional career opportunities in the field.

Students Competing In Robotics Tournaments Learn Valuable Team-Building And Technical Skills.

On its website, WCPO-TV  Cincinnati (2/4, Swift) reports that young students who participate in Lego robotics programs learn valuable STEM skills that can help them in future academic endeavors and their careers. Participants have to work together in teams to solve difficult problems by using technical skills to program Lego robots. The program has three levels for students of different ages: The Junior FIRST Lego League, the FIRST Lego League, and the FIRST Tech Challenge.

Massachusetts Will Be Represented At FIRST Lego League World Festival.

The Westborough (MA) Community Advocate  (2/4, Wambolt) reports the “Angry Owls” a Lego robotics team formed by students in Southborough and Westborough, Massachusetts will represent the state at the FIRST Lego League World Festival in St. Louis this year. The team won the regional qualifier back in December.

Also in the News

San Francisco 49ers Legend Representing Chevron’s STEM Zone At Super Bowl.

CNBC  (2/4, Wells) reports that former San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Dwight Clark attended events at Super Bowl City “as part of Chevron’s ‘STEM zone.’” Chevron “is using the Super Bowl to promote education in science, technology, engineering and math” to explain the science of football, even dissecting Clark’s famous play, “The Catch,” a touchdown catch that sent the 49ers to the Super Bowl in 1982. Chevron engineer Stephanie Reeves said, “Chevron is very passionate about STEM education, and we know that STEM careers are going to grow by 17 percent in the next two years.” The San Francisco Chronicle  (2/3, Matier, Ross, Subscription Publication) and the Baltimore Sun  (2/4, Bracken) each featured pictures from Chevron’s STEM Zone in their galleries of pre-Super Bowl festivity photos.

Thursday’s Lead Stories

Fight Over Flint Funding Threatens Energy Bill.
King, Donovan Tout Pell Grant Improvements To Foster College Completion.
EasyJet Releases Plans For Hydrogen Fuel Cell Jet.
Auto Hackers Will Go After Money, Data.
Some Ferguson Residents Denied Entrance To Public Hearing On DOJ Agreement.
Utah STEM Bill Advances, Arts Bill Dies.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Wiley and Dutch universities announce combined open access and subscription agreement
Publisher John Wiley and Sons, Inc. and the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) have announced an agreement of unlimited open access publication of Dutch academic articles combined with expanded subscription access to high-quality research. The negotiations between VSNU and Wiley resulted in an unprecedented agreement covering 2016 – 2019.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

New report identifies datasets to be explored to increase the UK’s global competitive advantage in research and innovation
A wide range of datasets across the research and innovation landscape have been identified and described in a recently published report, setting out a plan for exploiting these to their full potential to help maintain and develop the UK’s excellence in research and innovation. The UK Knowledge and Research Landscape: A report on available resources is the first step in refining and bringing together datasets that can be used and exploited further to inform strategic decision-making and enable funders to identify how future funding could be targeted to achieve the best value for money.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Future Science Group launches EpigenomicsNet, an interactive community for experts
Publisher Future Science Group (FSG) has announced the launch of EpigenomicsNet, a new online community for professionals with an interest in this area of scientific development. The portal, which is free to join, will allow users to share their own written content and video blogs using the platform’s unique, user-friendly tools.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

HighWire and TrendMD announce technology partnership
HighWire Press, Inc., a technology platform and strategic partner to scholarly publishers and societies, and TrendMD, a scholarly content discoverability recommendation engine, have announced a technology partnership to increase research discoverability to millions of readers. HighWire will enable publishers to easily integrate the TrendMD recommendation engine, proven to increase article awareness and readership by providing suggested articles personalised to individual readers’ interests and behaviour.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

IPR License hosts free licensing seminar series
IPR License, the global rights and licensing solution, has announced it will be embarking upon a series of free licensing seminars throughout 2016 due to demand within the publishing community. The first of these sessions will be London-based and will take place on February 16 and 18.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Unbound Medicine releases new disaster preparedness app
Unbound Medicine, a provider of knowledge management solutions for healthcare, has announced the release of Disaster Nursing, a new evidence-based mobile application that prepares nurses with the knowledge and skills to respond to disasters and public health emergencies in a timely and appropriate manner. Disaster Nursing is authored by Dr. Tener Goodwin Veenema, an internationally recognized expert in disaster nursing and public health emergency preparedness.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Dragonfly Sales and Marketing and ACCUCOMS announce new sales representation deal with the Independent Scholarly Publishers Group
Dragonfly Sales and Marketing Consulting and ACCUCOMS, both providers of sales and marketing services for publishers, have announced a major new agreement for sales representation for the Independent Scholarly Publishers Group (ISPG) in Europe, India, South Korea and Hong Kong. ACCUCOMS currently represents ISPG in Latin America, Southeast Asia, the Middle East and North Africa. Representation for the new territories commenced at the beginning of this year.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Fight Over Flint Funding Threatens Energy Bill.

The Hill  (2/4, Cama, Henry) reports that the battle over the Flint water crisis “is threatening to tank the Senate’s broad energy reform bill.” Negotiations to attach an “aid package were increasingly breaking down on Wednesday, with one key Democrat warning her caucus could block the underlying legislation if it isn’t satisfied.” Sen. Debbie Stabenow said, “We want to do something that will help people that need help,” and warned that Democrats are “not going to support moving forward” without assistance to the people of Flint. Senate Democrats “want a $600 million aid package, with $400 million to match state funds to repair and replace old pipes in the city and the balance going to a research and education center on lead poisoning.” Republicans are hesitating “at the cost of the package and are irked at the threats to delay the underlying bill, which has had bipartisan support.”

The “Floor Action” blog of The Hill  (2/4, Carney) reports that Sen. Jim Inhofe has offered an amendment that would “pay for the emergency Flint funding that Democrats are pushing for by using rescinded funds from a Department of Energy alternative vehicles program.” But Stabenow said, “I personally feel it’s an insult. It’s being done to embarrass us,” adding that it is a “slap in the face.” The Michigan Democrat “said that while she and other lawmakers are negotiating in ‘good faith’ that she was ‘amazed that this would be offered.’” She stated, “Now we are hearing in an amendment to the people of Flint, well, you’ve got a choice. You can either drink the water, have safe water or you can have a job.”

The Hill  (2/4, Cama, Henry) also reports that the Senate is slated “to hold a cloture vote on the energy reform bill” today but the “late maneuvering over the Flint aid package could derail that vote.”

Energy Bill Aims To Protect Grid From Hackers. The Hill  (2/3, Bennett) reports the Senate energy reform bill being negotiated “includes a number of cybersecurity provisions” that supporters “say will help bolster the power grid’s lagging digital defenses.” A section of the bill “dedicated to cyber threats” would “empower” the Energy Department “to take swifter action in the event of a major hack, authorizing it to direct energy companies in a cyber crisis.” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell praised “the cyber passages on Tuesday while encouraging his colleagues to vote for the bill, which is expected to pass sometime Thursday.”

Higher Education

King, Donovan Tout Pell Grant Improvements To Foster College Completion.

In commentary in the Huffington Post  (2/3), Education Secretary John King and OMB Director Shaun Donovan write about the Administration’s efforts to improve college affordability, saying that despite heavy investment and progress, “only 60 percent of those enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs complete their education.” To further improve college completion rates, the writers say the Administration is pushing for increased funding and other improvements for the Pell grant program.

Administration Increasing Pressure On College Accreditors.

The Wall Street Journal  (2/4, Belkin, Subscription Publication) reports that ED is increasing regulation of college accreditors in an effort to move against colleges with low student performance. The Journal reports Under Secretary Ted Mitchell is calling on accreditors to focus their efforts more on underperforming colleges, quoting him saying, “Accreditors’ evaluations must increasingly put a premium on student outcomes.”

Student Loans Can Affect Mortgage Eligibility.

US News & World Report  (2/4, Mayotte) reports a person’s student loans debt can affect their eligibility for a mortgage. The article details how student loans can affect eligibility for mortgages from the FHA, Veterans Administration, or Department of Agriculture.

“Cambridge 2 Cambridge” Hackathon Will Be Competition Between US And UK College Students.

The Boston Globe  (2/2, Subbaraman) reports college students from Cambridge, Massachusetts and Cambridge, England will compete against each other in the “Cambridge 2 Cambridge” hackathon in early March. President Barack Obama and UK Prime Minister David Cameron announced the event last January while Cameron was visiting the US. The event will include a virtual “capture the flag” contest between college teams and the winner will receive a $70,000 prize.

From ASEE
International Association of Continuing Engineering Education
Call for papers for May 17-20 conference in Porto, Portugal. January 31 deadline.

Surmounting the Barriers
The joint NAE-ASEE report makes recommendations for breaking down long-identified barriers to diversity in higher education.

Research and Development

EasyJet Releases Plans For Hydrogen Fuel Cell Jet.

CNBC  (2/2, Frangoul) reports, “European airline easyJet unveiled its plans for a zero emissions hydrogen fuel system on Tuesday,” saying the system is “based around the idea of stowing a hydrogen fuel cell in the hold of the aircraft.” The company said its “zero emissions system” could reduce fuel use by 50,000 tons per year, and “would capture energy when the aircraft brakes during landing, and would then charge lightweight batteries while the aircraft is on the ground.” This energy would be used while taxiing, “negating the need to use its conventional jet engines.”

Government R&D Can Be A Catalyst For Technological Progress.

In The Hill’s  (2/3, Brooks, Contributor, Logsdon) “Pundits Blog”, Chuck Brooks and David Logsdon discuss the role government research and development funding plays as a catalyst for technological advances and economic growth. The story notes the National Human Genome Research Institute, “a $3.8 billion federal investment to launch the Human Genome Project, jointly conceived and executed by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy, has resulted in an estimated economic impact of $965 billion between 1988 and 2012.”

Carnegie Mellon Launches IARPA-Funded Effort To “Reverse-Engineer” The Brain.

CIO Magazine  (2/3, Noyes) reports that a new $12 million effort was launched on Wednesday looking to “reverse-engineer” the human brain. The five-year project “seeks to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain’s learning methods” and is led by Tai Sing Lee, a professor in Carnegie Mellon. The project is funded by IARPA “through its Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks (MICrONS) research program, which is working to advance President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative.”

Sandia Labs Developing Nondestructive Techniques To Analyze Damage In Composites.

Azom  (2/3) reports researchers David Moore and Timothy Briggs from Sandia National Laboratories are “creating nondestructive techniques to spot damage in composites with the aid of conventional medical inspection method,” which includes sonograms, X-rays, plus modern techniques like ultrasonic spectroscopy, infrared imaging and computed tomography. The research into composite material is “part of Sandia’s national security mission, which includes energy efficiency and performance optimization in wind turbine blades, or lightweight vehicle.”

Industry News

Auto Hackers Will Go After Money, Data.

The Detroit Free Press  (2/3, Snavely) reports as cars become more connected to other systems, hackers will have an easier time accessing and taking control over vehicles for lucrative purposes. This view was posited by Anuja Sonalker, VP of engineering for TowerSec, “who spoke Wednesday during a discussion on cyber security at an Automotive Press Association event in Detroit,” the article reports. “Connectivity means (your car) is connected to something else. So, your car might be connected to your financial network. Or if it’s an electric vehicle it’s connected back to the electric grid,” said Sonalker, whose firm develops cyber security technology for the automotive industry. Therefore, hackers could potentially infiltrate “your car … and springboard to another network from there and get access to financial information.” NHTSA administrator Mark Rosekind said in January, “The fact that industry, in cooperation with NHTSA, is working to address this threat before, and not after, Americans are directly at risk, is an example of proactive safety.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Some Ferguson Residents Denied Entrance To Public Hearing On DOJ Agreement.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch  (2/3) reports “roughly 75 people were denied entrance” to the first public meeting in Ferguson over the proposed agreement with the DOJ that the council will vote on next Tuesday. A second hearing on Saturday will be held at Ferguson Community Center, which “can accommodate a significantly larger crowd.” Some of those who attended argued that the city should sign the agreement to avoid the cost of litigation, while others say the “agreement went too far and that Ferguson lacked the financial ability to comply.” New City Manager De’Carlon Seewood said Tuesday that at “first blush,” the agreement would cost $1.5 million a year.

Activist Mckesson Files To Run For Baltimore Mayor.

The Baltimore Sun  (2/3, Broadwater) reports civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson entered the “crowded” contest for Baltimore Mayor “minutes before the deadline to file” on Wednesday night. Mckesson, who “gained widespread attention” in Ferguson protests last year, came to Baltimore in April to demonstrate against police brutality following the death of Freddie Gray. He has met with top White House officials and Hillary Clinton, who has called him a “social media emperor.” Mckesson says he plans to release a platform in the next week.

Judge Cites Racism Of Michigan Officer During Sentencing Over Assault.

Mic  (2/3, Cheney-Rice) reports Judge Vonda Evans on Tuesday “laid into” former Inkster, Michigan officer William Melendez as she sentenced him to 13 months to 10 years in prison for assaulting 58-year-old Floyd Dent, an unarmed black man, at a traffic stop in Jan. 2015. Evans “repeatedly emphasized the role of racism in the case in no uncertain terms.”

Legislation Proposed To Support Wind Research At DOE.

E&E Daily  (2/3, Subscription Publication) reports Rep. Paul Tonko has introduced legislation “to support wind research at the Department of Energy.” The “Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 2016” directs the agency “to conduct a research-and-development program to improve the efficiency of wind generation capacity, optimize its design and reduce costs associated with permitting and other issues.” In addition, it “outlines a variety of wind technologies for department attention, such as offshore floating systems and ‘projects to assess and mitigate the impacts of hurricane wind flow.’” The bill “would authorize $200 million for each fiscal year from 2017 through 2021.”

Columbia Linguistics Professor: OJ Trial Showed Racial Divide Over Police.

In an op-ed for the New York Times  (2/3, Mcwhorter, Subscription Publication), John McWhorter, a linguistics professor at Columbia, says that amid continuous coverage of the OJ Simpson murder case, now being dramatized in a FX series, “America learned the difference between what the cops mean to black people versus what they mean to most others.” McWhorter said that during the trial, he saw “people ignoring the facts in favor of a kind of tribalism,” but now he realized that his view was because “my life had spared me from experiencing or even seeing police abuse.” He has found that “what prevents real racial conciliation and understanding in America is the poisonous relations between blacks and the police.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Utah STEM Bill Advances, Arts Bill Dies.

The Deseret (UT) News  (2/3, Franke) reports on the “second annual STEM fest” in Salt Lake City, Utah, “where companies and educators are gathering this week to showcase career opportunities in various STEM fields.” The piece explains that some parents believe that arts instruction ties STEM subjects together, but reports that while a bill to “earmark more than $2 million to expand computer science instruction in Utah schools” advanced in the state legislature this week, one to set a minimum amount to be spent on arts instruction did not.

Arizona Plans Budget Cut To Career And Technical Education That Could End Successful Programs Across State.

Tucson (AZ) Local Media  (2/3, Nintzel) reports Arizona education leaders are warning that many school districts will have to end their career and technical education programs if the state follows through with its plan to reduce funding for the programs by $30 million. The article mentions that the programs have been highly successful with a statewide graduation rate of 96% among program participants and quotes several education officials warning of the consequences if funding is cut. Pima County Superintendent Alan Storm says his district would likely have to end their program without state funding. The Tucson Metro Chamber CEO Mike Varney says local employers are “crying for qualified workers so they can grow.”

Two New Mexico Elementary Schools Going To Lego League World Festival In St. Louis.

The Albuquerque (NM) Journal  (2/3, Devine) reports students from Oregon Elementary and Yucca Elementary in the Alamogordo First Lego League Jr. in New Mexico have been selected to attend the 2016 FIRST Lego League World Festival in St. Louis to be held in April. FIRST is a program that aims to help young people develop STEM skills through various programs. Yucca Elementary’s team is coached by Heather Kangas who says the competition is a great opportunity for the students to meet with STEM professionals and learn more about exciting STEM careers.

California Awards Career Technical Education Incentive Grants To Districts, Charter School In Lompoc Area.

The Lompoc (CA) Record  (2/3, Guista) reports California awarded Career Technical Education Incentive Grants to two high school districts and one charter school in the Lompoc area. The grants aim to help the development of career and technical education programs. The state awarded $1.1 million to the Santa Maria Joint Union High School District, $737,109 to the Lucia Mar Unified School District, and $82,6685 to Orcutt Academy High School.

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

FBI Joins Probe Of Flint Contamination Ahead Of House Committee Hearing.
Prominent Public Universities Accepting More Out-Of-State Students.
University Of Tennessee Added To NNSA’s Nuclear Research Consortium.
Study: Battery-Powered Cars Beating Out Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles.
Johnson Defends EINSTEIN After Critical Audit.
Indiana High School Student Organizes Event To Get Elementary School Girls Interested In STEM.
High School Student Working Full-Time Job As Lead Engineer At Mobile App Startup.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 113 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 113 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 113 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae endophytically colonize cassava roots following soil drench inoculation Greenfield, M., Gómez-Jiménez, M.I., Ortiz, V., Vega, F.E., Kramer, M., Parsa, S. 2016 Biological Control ,
95 pp. 40 – 48 .
2 . Water stress causes stomatal closure but does not reduce canopy evapotranspiration in almond Spinelli, G.M., Snyder, R.L., Sanden, B.L., Shackel, K.A. 2016 Agricultural Water Management ,
168 pp. 11 – 22 .
3 . Inequalities on the spectral abscissa for matrices arising in a stage-structured population model Hastings, A., Van Den Driessche, P. 2016 Linear Algebra and Its Applications ,
494 pp. 90 – 104 .
4 . Unsupervised self-care predicts conduct problems: The moderating roles of hostile aggression and gender Atherton, O.E., Schofield, T.J., Sitka, A., Conger, R.D., Robins, R.W. 2016 Journal of Adolescence ,
48 pp. 1 – 10 .
5 . Twenty-five years of research in the north-central Chilean semiarid zone: The Fray Jorge Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research (LTSER) site and Norte Chico Armas, C., Gutiérrez, J.R., Kelt, D.A., Meserve, P.L. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 1 – 6 .
6 . Determination of silage face surface area on commercial California dairy farms Meyer, D.M., Robinson, P.H., Price, P.L., Heguy, J.M. 2016 Grass and Forage Science ,
71 ( 1 ) pp. 132 – 138 .
7 . Bet-hedging strategies of native and exotic annuals promote coexistence in semiarid Chile Jiménez, M.A., Gaxiola, A., Armesto, J.J., González-Browne, C., Meserve, P.L., Kelt, D.A., Gutiérrez, J.R., Jaksic, F.M. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 62 – 67 .
8 . El Niño Southern Oscillation drives conflict between wild carnivores and livestock farmers in a semiarid area in Chile Acosta-Jamett, G., Gutiérrez, J.R., Kelt, D.A., Meserve, P.L., Previtali, M.A. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 76 – 80 .
9 . Shrub-ephemeral plants interactions in semiarid north-central Chile: Is the nurse plant syndrome manifested at the community level? Madrigal-González, J., Kelt, D.A., Meserve, P.L., Squeo, F.A., Gutiérrez, J.R. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 47 – 53 .
10 . Biotic interactions and community dynamics in the semiarid thorn scrub of Bosque Fray Jorge National Park, north-central Chile: A paradigm revisited Meserve, P.L., Kelt, D.A., Gutiérrez, J.R., Previtali, M.A., Milstead, W.B. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 81 – 88 .
11 . The avifauna of Bosque Fray Jorge National Park and Chile’s Norte Chico Kelt, D.A., Cofré, H., Cornelius, C., Engilis, A., Gutiérrez, J.R., Marquet, P.A., Medel, R., Meserve, P.L., Quirici, V., Samaniego, H., Vásquez, R.A. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 23 – 36 .
12 . Synthesis, spectroscopic and crystal structure of a new 2D coordination polymer of Ni(II) constructed by naphthalene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid; Nanomolar detection of fructose at a nano-structured Ni(II) coordination polymer multiwall carbon nanotube Derikvand, Z., Azadbakht, A., Olmstead, M.M., Karimi, Z., Gharamaleki, J.A. 2016 Journal of the Iranian Chemical Society ,
13 ( 3 ) pp. 563 – 574 .
13 . Patterns in arthropod abundance and biomass in the semiarid thorn scrub of Bosque Fray Jorge National Park, north-central Chile: A preliminary assessment Meserve, P.L., Vásquez, H., Kelt, D.A., Gutiérrez, J.R., Milstead, W.B. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 68 – 75 .
14 . Rainfall, microhabitat, and small mammals influence the abundance and distribution of soil microorganisms in a Chilean semi-arid shrubland Aguilera, L.E., Armas, C., Cea, A.P., Gutiérrez, J.R., Meserve, P.L., Kelt, D.A. 2016 Journal of Arid Environments ,
126 pp. 37 – 46 .
15 . Using the variability of linkage disequilibrium between subpopulations to infer sweeps and epistatic selection in a diverse panel of chickens Beissinger, T.M., Gholami, M., Erbe, M., Weigend, S., Weigend, A., De Leon, N., Gianola, D., Simianer, H. 2016 Heredity ,
116 ( 2 ) pp. 158 – 166 .
16 . Habitat fragmentation and biodiversity conservation: key findings and future challenges Wilson, M.C., Chen, X.-Y., Corlett, R.T., Didham, R.K., Ding, P., Holt, R.D., Holyoak, M., Hu, G., Hughes, A.C., Jiang, L., Laurance, W.F., Liu, J., Pimm, S.L., Robinson, S.K., Russo, S.E., Si, X., Wilcove, D.S., Wu, J., Yu, M. 2016 Landscape Ecology ,
31 ( 2 ) pp. 219 – 227 .
17 . Bark water uptake promotes localized hydraulic recovery in coastal redwood crown Mason Earles, J., Sperling, O., Silva, L.C.R., Mcelrone, A.J., Brodersen, C.R., North, M.P., Zwieniecki, M.A. 2016 Plant, Cell and Environment ,
39 ( 2 ) pp. 320 – 328 .
18 . Comparative International Medical Education Srinivasan, M. 2016 Journal of General Internal Medicine ,
31 ( 2 ) p. 139 .
19 . Erratum to: Habitat fragmentation and biodiversity conservation: key findings and future challenges [Landscape Ecol, DOI: 10.1007/s10980-015-0312-3] Wilson, M.C., Chen, X.-Y., Corlett, R.T., Didham, R.K., Ding, P., Holt, R.D., Holyoak, M., Hu, G., Hughes, A.C., Jiang, L., Laurance, W.F., Liu, J., Pimm, S.L., Robinson, S.K., Russo, S.E., Si, X., Wilcove, D.S., Wu, J., Yu, M. 2016 Landscape Ecology ,
31 ( 2 ) pp. 229 – 230 .
20 . Role of sequential low-tide-period conditions on the thermal physiology of summer and winter laboratory-acclimated fingered limpets, Lottia digitalis Pasparakis, C., Davis, B.E., Todgham, A.E. 2016 Marine Biology ,
163 ( 2 ) , art. no. 23 , pp. 1 – 17 .
21 . Harnessing the power of RADseq for ecological and evolutionary genomics Andrews, K.R., Good, J.M., Miller, M.R., Luikart, G., Hohenlohe, P.A. 2016 Nature Reviews Genetics ,
17 ( 2 ) pp. 81 – 92 .
22 . Social re-orientation and brain development: An expanded and updated view Nelson, E.E., Jarcho, J.M., Guyer, A.E. 2016 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience ,
17 pp. 118 – 127 .
23 . Amoebic meningoencephalitis and disseminated infection caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in a Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) Gjeltema, J.L., Troan, B., Muehlenbachs, A., Liu, L., da Silva, A.J., Qvarnstrom, Y., Tobias, J.R., Loomis, M.R., de Voe, R.S. 2016 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ,
248 ( 3 ) pp. 315 – 321 .
24 . Lipoprotein(a) and apolipoprotein(a) in polycystic ovary syndrome Enkhmaa, B., Anuurad, E., Zhang, W., Abbuthalha, A., Kaur, P., Visla, J., Karakas, S., Berglund, L. 2016 Clinical Endocrinology ,
84 ( 2 ) pp. 229 – 235 .
25 . Symmetries of a generic utricular projection: neural connectivity and the distribution of utricular information Chartrand, T., McCollum, G., Hanes, D.A., Boyle, R.D. 2016 Journal of Mathematical Biology ,
72 ( 3 ) pp. 727 – 753 .
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Comments Off on Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Swiss patients and healthcare practitioners gain access to the Cochrane Library
Swiss patients and healthcare practitioners will now have access to over 6500 published systematic reviews in healthcare interventions through one-click access to the Cochrane Library. The Cochrane Library is a leading resource in evidence-based research across areas including pregnancy, mental health, surgical procedures and preventive care. Cochrane reviews provide independent high-quality evidence to aid healthcare decision making.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Leading physicians to provide commentary for unique peer-tested news magazine
SLACK Inc., publisher of Healio Rheumatology, has announced the members of its Peer Perspective Board for this new publication, launching in March. Published monthly, Healio Rheumatology will compile the most engaging content from medical website Healio.com and distribute it in a print news magazine reaching 6,100 physicians, including the universe of US rheumatologists.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Publishing Technology renews hosting collaboration with ASM
The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has signed an extension to its online hosting contract with Publishing Technology, which will see the organisation solidify its long term commitment to its digital platform ASMscience and continue its development plan for the future. The custom built website, which houses a vast and varying collection of microbiology research available online, has been steadily attracting traffic growth and usage since it was launched in 2013.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

ACCUCOMS and AAP announce continued partnership, expand sales representation into South East Asia
ACCUCOMS and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have announced their continued partnership with an expansion of their sales representation into South East Asia. Since 2006, AAP has been collaborating with ACCUCOMS as their sales representative in Europe, the Middle East, North America and Latin America. South East Asia has now been added to the portfolio with a new 3-year deal.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Allen Press appoints Martine Padilla as VP, Sales
Allen Press, Inc. has announced that Martine Padilla has been appointed Vice President of Sales and will join the organisation in mid-February. Padilla brings over 30 years of print industry experience to the position in which she will lead sales strategy for printing, distribution, online content hosting and publishing management.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Cengage Learning appoints industry leaders to head company’s strategic communications and marketing activities
Cengage Learning has announced the appointment of two industry leaders to head the company’s strategic communications and marketing activities. Sandi Kirshner has taken on the newly created role of Chief Communications Officer, while Sharon Loeb will serve as Chief Marketing Officer. The announcement was made by Cengage Learning CEO Michael Hansen.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Unbound Concepts and Baker & Taylor partner to help publishers improve discoverability of K12 content in classrooms and libraries
Technology company Unbound Concepts and Baker & Taylor, a worldwide distributor of digital and print books, have announced an exclusive partnership to help teachers, librarians and curriculum buyers search, identify, and discover content to best serve students in the classroom and library. Baker & Taylor will integrate and display Unbound Concepts’ newly launched flagship business offering – Artifact Access.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

FBI Joins Probe Of Flint Contamination Ahead Of House Committee Hearing.

Reuters  (2/2, Shepardson) reports the FBI joined the criminal investigation into lead contaminated drinking water in Flint, Michigan on Tuesday, with a bureau spokeswoman saying the agency is looking into whether federal laws were broken. Former federal prosecutor Peter Henning, now a law professor at Wayne State University in Detroit, said it will be difficult to find criminal charges under US environmental laws unless prosecutors can find something like a knowingly false statement. The Wall Street Journal  (2/2, Maher, Subscription Publication) adds that the FBI joins the US Postal Inspection Service and two divisions of the EPA among agencies working on the investigation with the US Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan. The Journal says the crisis has led to several resignations of city, state, and federal officials. On Tuesday, Darnell Earley, the emergency manager of Detroit’s public schools, announced his resignation. Earley was emergency manager for Flint until Jan. 2015.

The Detroit News  (2/2, Carah, Lynch) reports EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, in her first visit to Flint, blamed the crisis on Snyder’s administration and his appointed emergency managers, saying their decision to switch water systems was all in effort to save money. However, Keith Creagh, director of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality, “fired back,” in written testimony submitted ahead of Wednesday’s committee hearing, saying that from the time of the water switch until last month, “my observation is that the EPA did not display the sense of urgency that the situation demanded.” Meanwhile, Snyder spokesman David Murray responded that the governor “has said the crisis in Flint is a result of the failure of government at all levels — including the federal government.”

The Huffington Post  (2/2, Barron-Lopez) reports House Democrats “shamed” Republicans for scheduling a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on the Flint crisis without calling in Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder to testify. House Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier Becerra (CA) said he hopes “heads will roll” and that those responsible will be prosecuted. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD) added that there is “no doubt” Snyder is “culpable.” Meanwhile, Rep. Joe Crowley (D-NY) criticized Republicans for creating special committees to investigate the Benghazi and Planned Parenthood scandals but not for the Flint crisis. While a spokesman for the oversight committee said Snyder wasn’t asked to testify because Michigan is “conducting its own investigation,” Crowley said Michigan officials have “bankrupted their ability to investigate themselves.”

Two congressional staff members told the Detroit Free Press  (2/2, Spangler) that the House Oversight Committee voted to subpoena Earley to testify on Flint’s water crisis, but that he has refused to attend. Earley’s lawyer, A. Scott Bolden, confirmed the subpoena, but said it was issued Tuesday night and required Earley to testify at 9am Wednesday, a timeline Bolden said “borders on the nonsensical” and is “completely unenforceable.” Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings, the ranking Democrat on the committee, said Earley “has a right to assert the Fifth Amendment” and not testify “but his abrupt resignation earlier today and his refusal to testify … make it even more urgent that we hear directly from the governor.”

Higher Education

Prominent Public Universities Accepting More Out-Of-State Students.

The Washington Post  (2/2, Anderson) reports many prominent public universities are recruiting more out-of-state students because of changes in demographics and financial pressure to bring in more revenue through out-of-state tuition. In 2004, only four state flagship universities had more out-of-state than in-state freshmen students, but in 2014, there are now 10. The article includes lists of universities organized by the percentage of freshmen students who are in-state and the change in percentage of in-state students.

Report: College Metrics Need To Be Redesigned To Help Today’s Students.

US News & World Report  (2/2, Camera) reports a new research paper concluded that many traditional metrics of college success are outdated and need to be updated to better serve the need of so-called non-traditional students. The paper’s authors argue that many of the college metrics, including ED’s College Scorecard, assume college students went straight from high school to a four-year institution and are not the first generation of their family to attend college, but many college students today do not fit this mold. The report recommends that new metrics be developed to help prospective and current students discover, which institutions provide the best returns and outcomes so students can make better financial choices.

Opinion: College Students Need Humanities And Sciences To Succeed In Today’s World.

In an opinion piece on the NPR  (2/2, Frank) website, University of Rochester professor of astrophysics Adam Frank argues that “the old barriers between the humanities and technology are falling” and that today’s college students should study both instead of just focusing on one side of the humanities versus sciences divide. Frank says, “a kid who wants to write screenplays may find she must learn how to build web content for a movie related app” and “a kid who started out in programming may find himself working for a video game company that puts a high value on storytelling.”

From ASEE
International Association of Continuing Engineering Education
Call for papers for May 17-20 conference in Porto, Portugal. January 31 deadline.

Surmounting the Barriers
The joint NAE-ASEE report makes recommendations for breaking down long-identified barriers to diversity in higher education.

Research and Development

University Of Tennessee Added To NNSA’s Nuclear Research Consortium.

Tennessee Today  (2/2, Goddard) reports the University of Tennessee has been “named a major player” in the Nuclear Science and Engineering Nonproliferation Research Consortium, with the university receiving $4.25 million over five years to assist the NNSA-backed Consortium with issues concerning “nuclear instrumentation, radiation detection materials, radiochemistry, and forensics.” The article states the Consortium “is aiming to create a pipeline of new talent and generate new concepts and technologies in basic and applied nuclear science that can be transferred to the national laboratories.” The Consortium’s deputy executive director, UCOR Fellow and Associate Professor Jason Hayward “said that the research will help build upon already-strong collaborations with Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories.”

Researchers Developing New Potentials For Electrochromic Polymers.

The Imperial Valley (CA) News  (2/2, Esser) reports that National Institute of Standards and Technology Fellow Henri Lezec and Alec Talin of Sandia National Laboratories have recently published a paper in Nature Communications on their research in “marrying state-of-the-art nanometer-scale gratings with a Space Age-era thin-film polymer” to develop “full-color video displays” that use less power than current video displays. The article details their research and notes their new efforts to adapt the principles they found to develop “sunlight-readable displays that do not require an energy-consuming backlight.”

Yahoo Struggles To Maintain Research Labs.

Business Insider  (2/2, Kim) reports on Yahoo’s struggle to find and maintain a “clear role” for its in-house research lab. Yahoo Labs was forced to abandon longer-term research projects as the company came under financial pressure to develop “product-related initiatives with immediate business potential,” writes Insider. However, Yahoo Labs would like not exist today without CEO Marissa Mayer, reports Insider, adding that the lab initially had the freedom to pursue science and theory research that “might advance Yahoo’s search, advertising, and personalization efforts.”

MediaPost  (2/2) also reports.

Two Texas Universities Added To Top Research Schools List.

The Fort Worth (TX) Star-Telegram  (2/2, Walker) reports the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education named the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas in Denton as doctoral universities with the “highest” research activity placing them on a selective list of the 115 top research universities in the US, which includes Harvard and MIT. The Carnegie Classification analyses data from all colleges and “evaluates research activity for doctoral universities in making its assessments”, which are released every five years.

University Of Texas At Arlington Professor Receives Military Research Grant To Develop New Lasers.

Phys (UK)  (2/2) reports the US Army Research Office has awarded a three-year $600,000 grant to the University of Texas at Arlington engineering professor Weidong Zhou to continue development of “a new type of ultra-thin semiconductor laser.” Zhou says the new technology could be integrated with mainstream electronics to increase capacity and energy efficiency. Zhou has received other grants before to develop laser technology.

Industry News

Study: Battery-Powered Cars Beating Out Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles.

Business Insider  (2/2, Fierman) reports a new study from the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute has found that “hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) are losing badly to battery-powered electric vehicles” (BEVs) largely due to “limited infrastructure.” According to the study, while the costs associated with hydrogen refueling stations can be several times that of conventional gasoline stations, the use of hydrogen rather than electric cars “may better mimic” consumers’ current transportation habits, as it has a quicker refueling time and better overall efficiency. However, the study authors also stated, “No alternative fuel sources have the energy density, ease of use, and ease of transport as current liquid fossil (i.e., hydrocarbon) fuels.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Johnson Defends EINSTEIN After Critical Audit.

The Washington Times  (2/2, Blake) reports after a GAO audit found the “nearly $6 billion National Cybersecurity Protection System” known as EINSTEIN “has lacked the ability to adequate[ly] prevent hackers from breaching government networks,” DHS Secretary Johnson defended the system, saying it “already assisted federal authorities in spotting hack attacks.” Johnson said in a statement, “The first two phases of the EINSTEIN program have been deployed across all federal civilian departments and agencies. This now allows us to detect cybersecurity threats, and EINSTEIN has in fact proven invaluable to identify significant incidents.” Nonetheless, GAO “called into question the capabilities of EINSTEIN after a review revealed that the program has only been properly implemented by five of 23 required federal agencies and lacks adequate intrusion and prevention capabilities.”

Shuster Expected To Unveil Bill To Break Up The FAA.

Politico  (2/2, Wolfe, Caygle) reports House Transportation Chairman Bill Shuster “is on the cusp of launching the biggest shakeup for air travel in four decades” in legislation he’s expected to unveil Wednesday, which would shift thousands of FAA air traffic controllers “to a quasi-government corporation or nonprofit,” according to Republican members briefed on the bill earlier in the week. The legislation is supported by all major airlines other than Delta Air Lines, and is also backed by “three former transportation secretaries and President Barack Obama’s first FAA administrator.” They say the legislation “would aid efficiency, modernize air traffic control technologies faster and insulate the aviation system from fiscal feuds in Congress.” Those against it, including consumers’ groups, small plane manufactures, trade organizations, and some House Democrats, say the bill could give airlines “disproportionate control” over the aviation system.

Sandia Working To Design Revolutionary Offshore Wind Turbine With 200-Meter Long Blades.

Canadian Manufacturing  (2/2) reports that Sandia National Laboratories is working on “an ambitious plan to transform the offshore wind energy industry” involving a “revolutionary new wind turbine” that would rise “hundreds of metres high” and generate enough electricity “to single-handedly power a small city.” According to Sandia’s Offshore Wind Energy Program’s technical lead Todd Griffith, “The U.S. has great offshore wind energy potential, but offshore installations are expensive, so larger turbines are needed to capture that energy at an affordable cost.” These issues spurred the team to design a turbine that “will dwarf even the largest turbines in operation,” featuring blades “twice the length of a football field” and capable of generating 50-megawatts. The article notes the research is funded by DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy program and details some of the “novel features” that the enormous turbines would utilize.

Senate Rejects Six Amendments To Energy Reform Bill.

The Senate on Tuesday rejected six amendments to the energy reform bill that The Hill  (2/2, Cama) said “pursued partisan priorities on political spending and conservation.” By rejecting the amendments, which “included Republican ones…and Democratic ones,” the Senate “kept up the goals of leaders and the Energy and Natural Resources Committee to keep a bipartisan bill that would avoid turning off either party.” According to Majority Whip Cornyn, Majority Leader McConnell “is likely to file for cloture on the bill later Tuesday, which would line it up for a final vote on Thursday.”

The “Floor Action” blog of The Hill  (2/3, Carney) reports Cornyn told reporters “they hope to finish work on the bill that day as well.” In order to have that happen “leadership will need to get a time agreement or consent from every senator to either speed up the votes or skip over procedural hurdles that could otherwise threaten to drag out consideration of the energy bill.”

US Power Grid Vulnerabilities Attracting Attention.

Fox Business  (2/2) reports that “with the hacks into the Ukraine power grid, and the latest cyberattack on Israel’s Electric Authority, attention has returned anew to the vulnerabilities of the US power grid.” Though “Washington is moving to fix the problem,” the estimated 90 percent private ownership of US utilities is “confounding the solution,” and the “rise of the ‘smart grid’” has “poked open more entry points for miscreants to hack the grid’s computer systems.” DHS is cited saying “the US power grid routinely gets hit with hacks or physical attacks, with an estimated 331 from fiscal 2011 to 2014, and now occurring once every four days.” Fox Business goes on to discuss an ICS-CERT warning from early 2014 about a cyberattack on a US public utility conducted via the Internet. Fox Business lists ICS-CERT and NCCIC, among other units, as part of the US government’s “countermeasures.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Indiana High School Student Organizes Event To Get Elementary School Girls Interested In STEM.

Current In Westfield (IN)  (2/2, Skinner) reports Emmalee Severson, a junior at Westfield High School in Indiana, has organized “Girls Rock STEM”, an event aimed at getting more elementary school girls interested in STEM fields. Severson says, “I am currently looking to study engineering when I go to college, and I always felt like I didn’t have the experience that some people had with computer science or programming or anything science related. I just felt everybody else got involved earlier, and I wanted to give girls an opportunity to get involved earlier.” The event will be held at Westfield Intermediate School on February 20 and will feature five different stations for participants to learn about different STEM concepts through experimentation by playing with robots, extracting DNA from fruit, making ice cream, and other activities.

Indiana Class Learning STEM Skills By Building Prosthetic Hands.

The AP  (2/2) reports students in Sue Gore’s fifth grade class at Liberty Intermediate School in Chesterton, Indiana are learning how to be scientists, engineers, and designers. Students built prosthetic hands at home with the help of their parents to learn how to tackle problems the way scientists and engineers do. Gore worked with other teachers at the school to create a “maker space” where students have access to equipment and tools to help them complete STEM projects.

Amazon Promotes “Growth Mindset” In New Campaign To Improve Student Attitudes To Math.

Education Week  (2/2, Cavanagh) reports on the idea of a “growth mindset” being promoted by Amazon Education and TenMarks, an “Amazon company focused on schools,” in an effort to “transform student attitudes about math.” The campaign is called “With Math I Can,” and hopes to improve attitudes in order to improve learning. The effort is focused on a website, www.withmathican.org. It has been endorsed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development), and Common Sense Education. Critics, have suggested that it may lead to “promoting vague-yet-positive attitudes” instead of “concrete-but-difficult classroom strategies.”

Also in the News

High School Student Working Full-Time Job As Lead Engineer At Mobile App Startup.

US News & World Report  (2/2, Cirincione) reports 16-year-old high school student Tejas Manohar in Nashville, Tennessee has a full-time job as the lead engineer at startup AutoLotto. The company is developing an app to let users purchase lottery tickets on their phone instead of having to travel to a convenience store. Manohar contacted the founders and impressed them with his technical knowledge and questions about the backend of the planned app. While he works as a full-time engineer during the day, Manohar is finishing up his high school education at home at night.

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

Michigan Lays Out Plan To Determine If Flint Water Is Safe To Drink.
ED Cuts Student Aid Access To Several Trade Schools.
California Firm Marketing Less-Expensive Exoskeleton To Let Paralyzed Walk.
Israeli Builds Cybersecurity Complex In Desert City.
Rolls-Royce, Norwegian Agree To $2.7 Billion Engine Deal.
Amendments Pose Challenges For Energy Reform Bill.
Connecticut STEM Foundation Announces Increases Prizes At This Year’s STEM Fair.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Springer Nature appoints Rachel Burley as Publishing Director, BioMed Central and SpringerOpen
Springer Nature, a global research, educational and professional publisher, has announced the appointment of Rachel Burley to the role of Publishing Director, BioMed Central and SpringerOpen, effective February 1, 2016. Her responsibilities will include all of BioMed Central and SpringerOpen’s editorial and commercial activity.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Elsevier Foundation launches series of new programs addressing sustainability development goals
The Elsevier Foundation has launched a series of new programs to improve health information delivery, research ecosystems in developing countries, and diversity in science, technology and medicine (STM); a total annual contribution of $1 million. Through 2018, the Elsevier Foundation will build on its experience with a new program aligned with key aspects of the newly ratified Sustainable Development Goals of the UN (SDGs).
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Dr. Timo Hannay joins SAGE Publishing’s Board as Non-Executive Director
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has announced that that Timo Hannay is joining SAGE’s Board of Directors as a non-executive Director. Dr. Hannay recently launched SchoolDash, a company devoted to the analysis and visualization of data about primary and secondary schools in the UK. Until June 2015, he was the founding Managing Director of Digital Science, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Group that invests in and develops scientific software innovations in order to simplify and accelerate the research process.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Follett and EBSCO Information Services announce eBook partnership
Educational materials and technology solutions provider Follett has announced a partnership with EBSCO Information Services to make approximately 600,000 EBSCO-hosted eBooks available for ordering through Titlewave, Follett’s premier collection development and order platform for K-12 schools. EBSCO offers high-quality eBooks from more than 1,500 major publishers, including eBooks from more than 115 worldwide university presses.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

First Editor’s Draft of EPUB 3.1 now available for community review
The EPUB 3 Working Group has announced that the first Editor’s Draft of EPUB 3.1 is now available for community review. A condensed summary of the changes being put forward for review is available in the EPUB 3.1 Changes from 3.0.1 document.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Taylor & Francis Group and the Association for Science Teacher Education announce new publishing partnership
Academic publisher Taylor & Francis Group and the Association for Science Teacher Education (ASTE) have announced a new publishing partnership. Beginning with the 2017 Volume, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute ASTE’s highly regarded Journal of Science Teacher Education under the Routledge imprint.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Erasmus University Rotterdam selects OCLC WorldShare Management Services
Erasmus University Rotterdam, a university in the Netherlands with over 24,000 students and a research community of approximately 1,400 scientists, has selected OCLC WorldShare Management Services as its library management system. WorldShare Management Services (WMS) is a complete, cloud-based library management system that offers all the applications needed to manage a library, including Acquisitions, Circulation, Metadata, Resource Sharing, License Management and a single-search Discovery interface to connect library users to the information they need.
More

Search for more news in this Category
Search for more news in this Theme

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert