Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 The Society of Scholarly Publishing becomes London Info International 2017 Association supporter
London Info International has announced that the Society of Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is to be an Association supporter. Current SSP members will be entitled to special discounts to attend the LII conference. SSP joins LII’s growing list of supporters including SLA Europe (Association), Outsell (Research Partner), STM Publishing News, Research Information, Scope e-Knowledge Center and Wired.gov (Media Partners).
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 SAGE Publishing launches online data science courses for social scientists
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has launched SAGE Campus, a new series of online data science courses, to support social science researchers and equip them with a range of new skills to embrace the data revolution. Created in partnership with world-leading institutions, and with expert learning support from instructors available throughout, the online courses offer social scientists the key data science and programming skills they need to take advantage of the opportunities big data presents.
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 TRAILS selects ProQuest’s Academic Complete and College Complete
Treasure State Academic Information and Library Services (TRAILS), a consortium of 24 colleges and universities throughout Montana, has chosen ProQuest Academic Complete® and College CompleteTM ebook collection subscriptions to provide high-quality content and a powerful, intuitive user experience to its thousands of students, faculty and researchers. Academic Complete and College Complete are renowned as foundational, multi-disciplinary resources with unlimited, multi-user access.
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 Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation and Oxford University Press announce publishing partnership
The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation and Oxford University Press have entered into a new partnership to publish the Foundation’s journal Inflammatory Bowels Diseases, beginning in 2018. The journal is the first journal dedicated exclusively to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). It brings the most current information in clinical and basic sciences to physicians caring for IBD patients and investigators performing research in IBD and related fields.
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 ESMO names Prof. Fabrice André as new interim Editor-in-Chief of Annals of Oncology
ESMO, the leading European professional organisation for medical oncology has announced that Professor Fabrice André will be the new interim Editor-in-Chief of Annals of Oncology, effective September 14, 2017.Annals of Oncology is ESMO’s flagship scientific journal with an Impact Factor of 11.855, according to the latest Journal Citation Reports. The journal is now ranked 10th in the field, within the top 5% of oncology titles.
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 Publons and Wolters Kluwer partnership to empower reviewers
Publons formally announced its partnership with Wolters Kluwer last week. It is expected that this strategic partnership with one of the world’s leading global information service providers will empower Publons’ reviewers with a variety of innovative and time-saving products.
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 HighWire Press partners with PaperHive to enable research annotation and collaboration workflows
HighWire Press has announced a partnership with PaperHive, an annotation system and copyright-compliant collaborative research platform. HighWire offers streamlined integration of PaperHive to world-leading publishers who want to drive reader engagement and improve research workflows.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Study Warns That Plant Closures Will Impact Energy Prices, Reliability.

Platts Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Winston) covers a report by IHS Markit that was released Tuesday which indicates that current “trends in the power sector that favor development of renewable and gas -fired power at the cost of coal and nuclear generation could hurt electric reliability and affordability.” Concerning the study, Karen Harbert, president and CEO of the US Chamber’s Global Energy Institute said, “Policymakers must be focused on maintaining balance, and reject approaches that limit our options.” Platts adds that the research was sponsored by the Edison Electric Institute, the Nuclear Energy Institute and the Global Energy Institute at the US Chamber of Commerce. The study examined the “hypothetical impact” if coal and nuclear were removed from the generation mix, and found that the “retail price of electricity would have increased by 27% and the variability of monthly consumer bills would have gone up 22%.”

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Osborne) also reports on the IHS Markit report which warns that the “shift away from coal and nuclear is likely to leave the U.S. grid overly reliant on natural gas and renewable forms of energy and prone to more expensive and volatile electricity prices than we currently enjoy.” Lawrence Makovich, chief power strategist at IHS and the study’s lead author, sees “a confused energy market with criss-crossing and contradictory incentives for carbon-free energy that favors wind and solar energy through tax incentives but does not do enough to incentivise carbon-free nuclear.”

The Midland (TX) Reporter-Telegram Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Makovich) reports that Makovich said the energy market has “contradictory incentives for carbon-free energy that favors wind and solar energy through tax incentives but does not do enough to incentivise carbon-free nuclear.” Noting these “favored technologies,” he says there is a “clear economic argument behind making these additional interventions because we’re not dealing with a clear market operating without distortion.” Axios Share to FacebookShare to Twitterand the Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Siciliano, Seigel)also report the story

Higher Education

Udacity CEO To Offer Self-Driving “Nanodegree” Program.

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Ohnsman) reports Udacity CEO Sebastian Thrun plans to offer an “online self-driving car ‘nanodegree’ program” through his company in order to help staff rideshare operator Lyft’s autonomous vehicle team. According to Forbes, “Lyft will sponsor 400 scholarships over the next year for qualified candidates to complete Udacity’s…program, which certifies them to work with companies struggling to find engineering talent in that field.” In addition, Thrun is also “creating the first academic program for those wanting to design so-called flying cars.”

Texas A&M-San Antonio President Outlines Women’s Growing Presence In STEM Fields.

Texas A&M University-San Antonio President Dr. Cynthia Teniente-Matson, in a piece for the Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Teniente-Matson, Columnist), says the number of women in NASA’s recent graduating class of astronauts constitutes “a game-changing moment for women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics – or STEM – careers.” Noting the National Student Clearinghouse forecast STEM jobs to grow by almost 25 percent by 2020, Teniente-Matson also outlines higher education institutions’ role in the “increasing shift in the number of women interested in STEM.” She adds that female students interested in STEM fields “do well in Texas, and Texas A&M University ranks first in Texas and 12th nationally on a list of colleges that graduate the most women in STEM, according to BestColleges.com.” On Thursday, Teniente-Matson says, her university will build on this progress by hosting “a topping-out ceremony for the construction of the 136,000-square-foot Science & Technology Building,” slated to open next fall.

ED Approves Purdue’s Plan To Buy Kaplan University.

The Indianapolis Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that Purdue University officials say that ED has approved the school’s plan to purchase for-profit chain Kaplan University. However, ED “has outlined certain conditions that need to be met, which Purdue says it will work to address as it prepares to complete the transaction.” Now, the Star reports, the biggest remaining stumbling block to the deal is the approval of the accreditor the Higher Learning Commission, which “is expected to make a decision in the coming months.” Purdue’s plan to purchase Kaplan and “create a new, online university that Purdue is calling ‘New University’…rocked the higher education world, where for-profit institutions have fought against reputations as predatory debt-traps and struggled against increased regulation imposed by the Obama administration.”

The Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that ED “‘preliminarily concluded’ that it had no objections to the deal,” but “noted that final approval requires more information from the parties involved, and that conditions would be imposed.” The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that the deal had already been approved by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education in August. This piece adds that “some Purdue faculty members have criticized the deal, saying they’re worried about the reputation of Kaplan University and parent Kaplan Higher Education,” both of which “face investigations and lawsuits in several states over hiring and recruitment practices.”

Inside INdiana Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) and the St. Joseph (MO) News-Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) also cover this story.

ED Also Approves Art Institutes Sale. The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Savransky) reports that in addition to the Purdue/Kaplan deal, ED approved the nonprofit Dream Center’s purchase of the Art Institutes, currently owned by EDMC. The Hill reports that ED’s approval of the deals “could signal a change in the way these deals are looked at under Education Secretary Betsy DeVos,” noting that the Obama administration “did not allow for the conversion of one for-profit to nonprofit college.”

Senate Democrats Call On CFPB To Keep Pressure On Student Loan Industry.

Inside Higher Ed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Kreighbaum) reports Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) have written to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau director Richard Cordray calling for the agency “to maintain active oversight of loan servicers and other participants in the student loan industry.” The letter comes “in the wake of a Department of Education decision to terminate two agreements with the agency involving oversight of student loan programs.” The letter calls this move “another example of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos acting in favor of private student loan companies at the expense of borrowers.”

Poll: Most Voters Support Free College.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that according to a Politico/Morning Consult poll, 63% of respondents expressed some level of support for making four-year college free. The concept is, “unsurprisingly, more popular among those who describe themselves as liberal than conservative — though 40 percent of conservatives said they’d support the proposal — and it enjoyed strong support from younger voters.”

American Council On Education Amicus Brief: Travel Ban Harmed American Education’s Global Reputation.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that the American Council on Education is planning to file an amicus brief with the US Supreme Court arguing that “the Trump administration’s travel ban has harmed America’s reputation in a global education market.” The brief says, “From the moment it was signed, prospective students expressed serious concerns about attending American colleges and universities. Faculty recruits were similarly deterred from accepting teaching and research positions. And scholars based abroad pulled out of academic conferences in the United States, either because they were directly affected by the EO or because they are concerned about the EO’s harmful impact on academic discourse and research worldwide.”

Governors Of Western States Discuss Region’s Shortage Of Skilled Workers.

Citing the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Denver Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports four out of the five states with the lowest unemployment rates are in the western half of the US, “a region where economic development is increasingly finding itself handcuffed to workforce development.” At a Western Governors’ Association-hosted workforce development workshop on Monday, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper commented, “Our labor market is way tight,” but companies do not want to relocate to the region because of a shortage of skilled laborers. The WGA, which is comprised of 19 western states, is hoping to address that problem by “better aligning the skills workers have with those that employers want.” South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard told attendees that one goal of workforce development programs is to raise awareness among high school students about the necessity of pursuing post-graduation training and the dangers of dropping out. Those post-graduation options, he said, include pathways outside of the traditional four-year college degree.

Companies, Colleges Partner To Train Workers For Tech Maintenance Jobs.

NBC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that companies and colleges are uniting to train “new collar” students to maintain and program computers. These “new collar” jobs are positions “that require some specialized education (typically in a technical field), but not a four-year college degree.” Some companies “have become so desperate for the right worker, they have started or invested in job training programs of their own, partnering with schools to equip students with the exact skills they will need to get a job, and then to do the job right.” Delta, for example, “has partnered with 37 aviation maintenance schools across the country to give thousands of students the technical knowledge needed to be an aviation maintenance technician (AMT) — and ideally to get them jobs at Delta down the road.”

From ASEE
LIVE WEBINAR – ASEE & National Instruments on “Building a Partnership to Tackle the Challenges in Engineering Education & Research”
On September 26th (2pm eastern), we’ll explore how partnerships between academic institutions and National Instruments are addressing major trends to drive research funding, improve student outcomes, and enable global impact. Register now.

ASEE Board Reorganization – Feedback Needed
ASEE ED Norman Fortenberry presents rationale on a proposed reorganization of the ASEE Board of Directors. Please leave your feedback (ASEE member login required).

NEW Podcast
One energy solution may be found in looking toward the ocean…not necessarily what you’d expect from researchers at land-locked Penn State.

Research and Development

NSF Awards Coalition Of Alabama Universities Grant For Plasma Technology Research.

Alabama Live Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports the National Science Foundation awarded through its Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR a five-year $20 million grant to a coalition “of nine Alabama universities, led by the University of Alabama in Huntsville.” The grant “will fund the ‘development of new predictive plasma-surface interaction technologies for the nation’s aerospace, manufacturing, energy, environment, and agricultural sectors,’ according to a statement from UAH.” UAH Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research director and Department of Space Science chair Dr. Gary Zank, also a National Academy of Sciences member, will serve as the project’s Principal Investigator. Sen. Richard Shelby praised UAH for leading the coalition to land the NSF grant. WZDX-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Huntsville, AL (9/19) reports online, “By leveraging Alabama’s strengths in fundamental low-temperature plasma science, the research team hopes instead to develop new predictive plasma-surface interaction technologies.”

NSF Awards 10 South Carolina Colleges Grant For Advanced Materials Research.

Columbia (SC) State Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports 10 South Carolina colleges were awarded a five-year, $20 million grant from the National Science Foundation “to research and develop new materials – primarily for industries” with preferences in South Carolina, including IBM and Boeing. University of South Carolina vice president for research Prakash Nagarkatti “said the grant will benefit both graduate students doing the research and undergraduates, including USC engineering students, who can take new advanced materials courses.”

University Of Michigan To Fund Civil Engineering Research Projects.

The St. Joseph (MI) Herald Palladium Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) reports University of Michigan researchers and Benton Harbor officials formally announced their new partnership, the SMART and Healthy Cities initiative, on Monday. Tierra Bills, an assistant professor at the school’s Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Engineering, said the collaboratory’s goal is to work together to identify and find solutions to the city’s engineering challenges. Through the partnership, the University of Michigan will fund seven Benton Harbor research projects. Bill commented, “I want to understand the extent at which those improvements to Benton Harbor’s transit system will help Benton Harbor residents better reach desired destinations.”

New York University Engineering Students Win $1 Million In Smart Gun Competition.

The New York Daily News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams announced on Monday that a team of New York University Tandon School of Engineering students won a $1 million smart gun design competition. A retired New York City Police Department captain, Adams “launched the gun competition” in “hopes the idea will one day lead to a reduction in violence.” Students Sy Cohen, Ashwin Raj Kumar, Eddilene Paola Cordero Pardo, and Jonathan Ng designed a high-tech vinyl gun holster with three security options: voice recognition, a sensor-activated release, and fingerprint matching. The student team is now in the process of submitting the design for a patent, and will use the award money to create a working prototype over the next few months.

NASA Images Show Potential For Buried Ice Near Martian Equator.

SPACE Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Howell) reports on new research published in the journal Icarus which states that enhanced imagery from NASA’s Mars Odysses spacecraft detected hydrated salts within recurring slope lineae (RSLs) near the equator of Mars. Principal author Jack Wilson said that the higher- resolution images showed “unexpectedly high amounts of hydrogen — a potential sign of buried water ice or very hydrated salts — around sections of the Martian equator.” Wilson “acknowledged that we can’t know for sure how much water is inside of an RSL unless we sent a rover to excavate,” and that a rover might contaminate a site it was sent to. The study states that it is clear the RSLs were not fed from water “in the near subsurface.” Wilson said that the most interesting part of the study was the lingering question of where “this water came from and why it is still present near the surface.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Block Island Wind Farm Tracking Birds and Bats.

Offshore Wind Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that Deepwater Wind has “installed a wildlife tracking station on the easternmost foundation platform at the Block Island wind farm, America’s first offshore wind farm, to assist researchers in their studies of bird and bat activity off the Atlantic Coast.” The project, funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, will “provide researchers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the University of Rhode Island (URI) and the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst with data on offshore movement of high priority species to inform conservation efforts.”

Additional coverage was provided by North American Windpower Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Lillian) and Power Engineering Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19).

Port of Corpus Christi, Army Corps Of Engineers Agree To Expand Ship Channel.

The San Antonio Express-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Druzin) reports the Port of Corpus Christi and the US Army Corps of Engineers are moving forward with the first phase of a $327 development project that will deepen and widen the Corpus Christi Ship Channel. The port’s executive director John LaRue said the project will help boost oil exports, benefiting companies including NuStar Energy, Buckeye Partners and Occidental Petroleum.

Nearly 200K Floridians Still Without Power After Hurricane Irma.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) reports that Florida utilities say they have restored power to nearly 98 percent of the 7.8 million customers that lost power during Hurricane Irma, leaving nearly 195,000 homes and businesses still without electricity. Florida Power & Light says it has 110,000 customers without power and Duke Energy Corp. reported 57,000 outages.

FPL Fined For The Customers Still Left Without Power After Hurricane Irma. The South Florida Sun Sentinel Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Pounds) reports that 20,000 homes and business in South Florida were still without power on Tuesday morning after Hurricane Irma hit more than a week ago. Despite spending nearly $3 billion since 2006 to upgrade its distribution system, a total of 4.4 million Florida Power & Light customers still lost power after the hurricane. Although South Florida crews were traveling “neighborhood to neighborhood to restore power” in the hardest-hit parts of Miami-Dade, Coral Gables city attorney still thought the progress was not happening fast enough, and “sent a letter to FPL, fining the utility $500 a day per home without power, up to $15,000 a day.” The city is also considering filing a lawsuit against the utility.

Puerto Rico Braces For Major Damage To Power Grid From Hurricane Maria.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, DiSavino) reports that Hurricane Maria is expected to “slam Puerto Rico with a direct hit” on Wednesday, which could “devastate the island’s underfunded power grid.” Less than two weeks ago, Hurricane Irma just “grazed Puerto Rico, knocking out power to more than 1 million of PREPA’s 1.5 million customers,” 60,000 of are still without power. The island’s power provider, Puerto Rico Electric Authority (PREPA) filed for bankruptcy this July due to “years of underinvestment that yielded a system it called ‘degraded and unsafe.’” Experts say even if the system were in prime condition, this hurricane would still do major damage; however, since it is not, “the island could be faced with outages for weeks, straining the resources of a utility whose power plants have a median age of 44 years, compared with an industry average of 18 years.”

Massachusetts Committee Hears Testimony On Bill Seeking To Erase Fossil Fuels From State’s Energy Mix.

The Taunton (MA) Daily Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Lannan) reports that the Massachusetts’ Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy Committee listened to arguments supporting bills calling on the state to get 100 percent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2035. Supporters of the bill, which was filed by Sen. Jamie Eldridge and Reps. Sean Garballey and Marjorie Decker, “said severe weather and sea-level rise brought on by climate change merits urgent and significant action,” while representatives of utilities and the petroleum industry pointed to the major role natural gas plays in the state’s energy mix. Natural gas currently supplies two-thirds of the electricity in Massachusetts. Steve Dodge, the executive director of the Massachusetts Petroleum Council, told the committee in his testimony that the state “cannot cut the cord completely” on fossil fuel even as it adds renewable energy technology because of “heavy demands on oil and natural gas use for electricity generation, transportation and industrial and commercial use.” Dodge added, “I fear that this push to not only eliminate all fossil fuels but to prevent additional fossil fuel infrastructure is going to create a problem when it comes to reliability.”

WBUR-FM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Boston (9/19, Gellerman) reports that “if Benson’s bill or a similar proposal in the state Senate are approve, the state would inflate the cost of carbon-burning fuels.” However, supporters of the bill are already grappling with what to call the additional cost. Rep. Benson avoided the word tax and called it an “investment opportunity,” while Michael Ferrante, president of the Massachusetts Energy Marketers Association, said, “We call it a carbon tax, a carbon fee. Essentially, it’s a tax on a unit of fossil fuel.” Meanwhile, Steve Dodge said he won’t be “buttonholed” into calling it a fee or a tax, stating, “It’s an added expense so legislators, regulators, can call it what they want.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

New York City Program Uses Math To Address Racial Gap In School Admissions.

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, Husock) contributor Howard Husock, the policy research vice president at Manhattan Institute and director of the Social Entrepreneurship Initiative, profiles the Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics, or BEAM, founded by Daniel Zaharopol and Lynn Cartwright-Punnett. BEAM has adopted a different approach than many other advocacy groups in addressing the “small numbers of African-American and Hispanic students” who are admitted to selective New York City high schools. BEAM starts “with sixth- and seventh-grade students in 35 of New York’s middle schools with the most disadvantaged students, identifying those with exceptional raw ability to succeed in high-level mathematics,” and invites them to “intensive summer programs.” At the programs, the students are “taught, to a significant extent, by college and university math faculty looking for ways to reach those whom they would not ordinarily teach.”

Computer Science Initiative In Arkansas Schools Detailed.

The Seventy Four Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) reported that Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson recently visited a North Little Rock high school classroom to “experience firsthand what students across his state are learning, thanks to an ambitious, first-in-the-nation initiative he is spearheading – in partnership with universities, major corporations, and educators – to teach computer science to every student in Arkansas.” The article characterizes Arkansas as “going all in on computer education, spending an initial $5 million to train teachers and help districts pay for staffing and equipment to bring computer literacy to all grade levels.” In the initiative’s first two years, “the number of Arkansas high schoolers taking computer science has exploded, from 1,100 to 5,500 students – nearly 20 percent of the high school senior population.”

Kyyba CEO: America Needs To Encourage Young People Into STEM Careers.

Kyyba President and CEO Tel Ganesan writes in the Detroit News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19) that the economic stability and growth of the nation “is hindered – and is at risk of weakening – due to combined problems in STEM industries,” adding, “We must get American young people interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers.” Some of the problems he lists include “the current lack of quality U.S.-born candidates to fill too many vacant STEM jobs,” the “current demise of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” and “too few H1-B visas permitted annually which allow foreign- born STEM experts into the country for work.” He adds, “Our nation’s strength relies too heavily on the H1-B visa system. Immigration policies and our educational system should support and be a catalyst for creating disruptive, ground-breaking technologies that improve the world and keep the U.S. on the cutting edge in these fields.”

Lafayette Officials Consider Expanding Opportunities For Language Immersion, STEM Education.

The Lafayette (LA) Daily Advertiser Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/19, McElfresh) reports that Lafayette school officials “are considering ways to expand opportunities for language immersion and STEM education.” Lafayette’s David Thibodaux STEM Magnet Academy “has nearly 1,200 students in sixth through 12th grades.” Because of the school’s popularity, the district “has added 75 slots per year, starting last year, said Superintendent Donald Aguillard. Officials plan to add seats for the next couple of years.” School Board President Dawn Morris said on Monday, “It’s my belief we need to expand our STEM offerings across the board.” Morris “suggested a STEM-focused elementary school, and perhaps another site for a STEM middle school, allowing David Thibodaux to become a complete high school site.”

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier launches new, improved HESI review and testing solution
Elsevier, the information analytics business specialising in science and health, has launched a new, more powerful and intuitive version of the HESI assessment platform. This new solution from Elsevier will help nursing schools and educators analyse and improve student performance from admission to graduation.
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 Springer Healthcare’s Medicine Matters expands to include oncology and rheumatology resources
Springer Healthcare, part of the Springer Nature group, has launched two new websites specialising in oncology and rheumatology to complement their flagship medical education platform, Medicine Matters diabetes. The three therapy-specific medical education platforms now form a family of products to support healthcare professionals worldwide.
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 ACS Publications endorses publishing trade group’s approach towards ResearchGate
The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society supports the constructive and user-friendly solution that the International Association of Scientific Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) has proposed to ResearchGate, a venture capital-funded commercial sharing website. STM’s offer was sent to ResearchGate on behalf of its member publishers.
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 Thieme adds Current Research: Concussion journal to its portfolio of expanding open access publications
Medical and scientific publishing house Thieme has announced the addition of an innovative concussion journal to its portfolio of expanding open access publications. New innovations are planned for the coming months and years, starting with the very first complete online publication. In the pipeline are articles on diagnostic and treatment advances as well as on changing concussion policies impacting the workplace and sports.
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 CRC Press announces new expanded edition of highly acclaimed laboratory animal program management book
CRC Press has announced that the new edition of Management of Animal Care and Use Programs in Research, Education, and Testing, Second Edition, by Robert H. Weichbrod, Gail A. (Heidbrink) Thompson, John N. Norton is now available. It has more than doubled the number of chapters in the original volume to present a more comprehensive overview of the current breadth and depth of the field with applicability to an international audience.
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 Frontline Medical Communications expands digital publishing and sales support team
Frontline Medical Communications, a provider of digital, print and live events for physicians and other health care professionals, recently announced expansion of the digital publishing and sales support team. A change in leadership and numerous promotions among Audience Development and Digital Production staff addresses the increasing importance of customer data.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

DOE Investing Up To $50 Million To Improve Security Of Nation’s Critical Energy Infrastructure.

Breaking Energy Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) reports that the Department of Energy is announcing “awards of up to $50 million to DOE’s National Laboratories to support early stage research and development of next-generation tools and technologies to further improve the resilience of the Nation’s critical energy infrastructure, including the electric grid and oil and natural gas infrastructure.” Secretary Perry is quoted saying, “By leveraging the world-class innovation of the National Laboratories and their partners, this investment will keep us moving forward to create yet more real-world capabilities that the energy sector can put into practice to continue improving the resilience and security of the country’s critical energy infrastructure.”

CleanTechnica Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Casey) reports that renewables “take front and center” in the initiative. In fact, the Energy Department announced the new funding program “with a forceful statement in favor of renewables” – the platform for the new program is the Energy Department’s Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium, which will “develop and validate innovative approaches to enhance the resilience of distribution systems – including microgrids – with high penetration of clean distributed energy resources (DER) and emerging grid technologies at regional scale.”

Higher Education

NSF Awards ASEE $473K To Craft Inclusion Training For LGBTQ Engineers.

The Washington Free Beacon Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Harrington) reports that the NSF is spending $587,441 “to create ‘safe zone’ inclusion training so more members of the LGBTQ community become engineers.” The joint study “will not start until January 2018,” and is being conducted by the ASEE, “Rowan University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.” The study aims “to find ways to combat what the researchers call a ‘chilly’ environment for lesbian, gay, and transgender individuals in engineering labs.” Specifically, “a grant worth $473,325 was awarded to the” ASEE.

NSF Grants Cal State LA $465K To Improve STEM Diversity.

Campus Technology Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Bolkan) reports the NSF granted California State University, Los Angeles $464,977 “to help diversify the STEM workforce.” The three-year grant will go toward the university’s “FYrE@ECST” program that aims to “use student cohorts, peer-assisted supplementary mathematics instruction, hands-on labs and a faculty mentor to help promote student success.” The university said “the first-year program was part of a larger California State University initiative aimed at producing more STEM professionals over the next decade and ‘was established to provide more holistic advisement and STEM foundational skills to students, so they can be successful in their majors and be inspired to complete their degrees.’”

From ASEE
LIVE WEBINAR – ASEE & National Instruments on “Building a Partnership to Tackle the Challenges in Engineering Education & Research”
On September 26th (2pm eastern), we’ll explore how partnerships between academic institutions and National Instruments are addressing major trends to drive research funding, improve student outcomes, and enable global impact. Register now.

ASEE Board Reorganization – Feedback Needed
ASEE ED Norman Fortenberry presents rationale on a proposed reorganization of the ASEE Board of Directors. Please leave your feedback (ASEE member login required).

NEW Podcast
One energy solution may be found in looking toward the ocean…not necessarily what you’d expect from researchers at land-locked Penn State.

Research and Development

Pratt & Whitney Completes Tests On Novel Fighter Engine. (9/18)

Engineering360 (9/18) “Pratt & Whitney says it has completed testing a three-stream fan in an engine with an F135 core as part of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory’s Adaptive Engine Technology Development (AETD) program. Modern military turbofan engines have two airstreams, one that passes through the core of the engine, and another that bypasses the core.”

PRNewswire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) also provides coverage of the story.

Arecibo Observatory Closed As Hurricane Maria Advances On Puerto Rico.

SPACE Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Cofield) reports that the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico ceased operations Monday in advance of what Hurricane Maria, what the National Hurricane Center has called a “potentially catastrophic category 5 hurricane.” Officials said on Twitter that Arecibo will remain closed through Thursday, and will keep its visitor center closed through Sept. 28. Facility personnel are carrying out storm preparations including efforts to secure the “telescope, physical facilities and research equipment.” The Arceibo Observatory hosts the “second-largest radio telescope in the world,” which is used to “study a wide variety of cosmic phenomena, look for near-Earth asteroids that could potentially collide with the planet and search for signs of alien civilizations.”

DOT Awards Grants For Research To Improve Transportation For People With Disabilities.

METRO Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) reports the Department of Transportation “awarded six application development research contracts, totaling $6.185 million for a period of performance through 2019.” They are under the department’s Accessible Transportation Technologies Research Initiative, “a multimodal departmental effort geared toward identifying and developing transformative transportation applications for all disabilities.”

Scientists Store Light As Sound Waves On Computer Chip For The First Time.

“For the first time ever, scientists have stored light-based information as sound waves on a computer chip – something the researchers compare to capturing lightning as thunder,” ScienceAlert (AUS) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, MacDonald) reports, and “while that might sound a little strange, this conversion is critical if we ever want to shift from our current, inefficient electronic computers, to light-based computers that move data at the speed of light.” Birgit Stiller, a project supervisor at the University of Sydney in Australia, said, “The information in our chip in acoustic form travels at a velocity five orders of magnitude slower than in the optical domain. … It is like the difference between thunder and lightning.” Moritz Merklein, a member of the research team, added, “For [light-based computers] to become a commercial reality, photonic data on the chip needs to be slowed down so that they can be processed, routed, stored and accessed.” The findings were published in Nature Communications.

NSF Grants UT $15M To Explore Materials For Development Of Medical Devices, Electronics Components.

The Austin (TX) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Subscription Publication) reports that under a $15.6 million NSF grant, the University of Texas at Austin Share to FacebookShare to Twitter “will explore the creation and manipulation of new types of materials that could improve the development of medical devices and electronic components.” Specifically, “the funds will help launch UT-Austin’s Center for Dynamics and Control of Materials” (CDCM). UT professor Edward Yu said the concept “known as dynamic control…can be found in the natural world in applications such as camouflage.” UT-Austin researchers will reportedly “focus on two main streams of research, including nanoparticles, which have applications in drug delivery, water purification and other uses,” and the “other research stream will study the use of illumunation to control the structure of a material and its properties, which has potential applications in communications and information processing technologies.”

Clemson Researcher Develops Tech To Enhance Stem Cell Treatments For Heart Failure.

The Greenville (SC) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Osby) reports Clemson bioengineering professor Ying Mei and researchers from the University of South Carolina, the Medical University of South Carolina, and the University of Chicago are investigating ways to use stem cells to treat heart failure. The NIH awarded them $1.5 million to develop “a technology that blends the cells with silicon nanowires, like those used to make computer chips, into a spherical shaped microtissue that can be injected into the heart.” Mei asserted this will allow more stem cells “to remain in the heart as well as for synchronized heart beats and less opportunity for arrhythmia.” The article calls this research “promising,” but “Mei said a new treatment based on the research is at least a decade off.”

NSF Grants Columbus State $293K For Scanning Electron Microscope.

The Columbus (GA) Ledger-Enquirer Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Berson) reports the NSF granted Columbus State University $293,575 “to purchase a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to use in scientific research programs.” The article says the “award will allow students to work directly with faculty and enhance on-going research programs at field sites, museums, herbarium collections and in biology and chemistry laboratories.” Columbus State University professor Kevin S. Burgess said, “The SEM will facilitate outreach opportunities for recruitment as well as the recruitment of high school students to STEM fields.”

Survey Finds Increase In Confidence In Self-Driving Cars With Experience.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Mitchell) summarizes a survey by global consulting firm AlixPartners that found 18 percent of respondents “reported personal experience with driver-assist features such as automatic braking, lane keeping and adaptive cruise control.” Among those 18 percent, “49 percent said they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ of driverless cars, 21 percent are neutral and 31 percent are not confident.” Yet, “Of respondents with no experience with self-driving features, only 28 percent said they were confident or very confident of driverless cars.” AlixPartners Managing Director Mark Wakefield said conversion to comfort with the technology is quick, once people have experience with it.

Industry News

Hyperloop Competitions Give Students Opportunity To Impress Musk.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, McBride) reports that since Elon Musk’s rocketry firm SpaceX announced its Hyperloop competition two years ago, the company “has found a unique formula for luring talent at little cost. While most companies spend extensively on recruiting, the hyperloop competitions consistently bring in eager, young prospects on their own dime jockeying to show off their abilities.” While winners often get no financial rewards, they do get “a shot at impressing their hero,” Musk.

Honda Investing $267M, Adding 300 Jobs At Two Ohio Factories.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Lippert) reports that “Honda Motor Co. is investing $267 million and adding 300 jobs at two Ohio factories as it begins mass production of the redesigned Accord flagship sedan for 2018.” The investments “include $220 million for hundreds of new welding robots and other upgrades at the company’s Marysville assembly plant, and $47 million for its engine plant in nearby Anna to start building the company’s first turbocharged engine.” Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Carey) reports that “Honda unveiled the newest-generation Accord in July, one of four re-engineered midsize sedans.” The article quotes Honda Manufacturing Leader for Accord Steve Rodriguez saying the new plant investments mean the company “will have a capacity of 440,000 vehicles a year and can add volume for the Accord as necessary.” The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Roberts, Subscription Publication) also reports.

Analysts Have Mixed Reactions To How Fast Tech Will Change Auto Industry.

Quartz Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Coren) reports that advances in technology could change transportation in the US sooner than some people think, but analysts give mixed reactions to how soon technology will change the auto industry. While one Bay Area think tank called RethinkX predicts that by 2030, “shared, autonomous electric vehicles will account for 95% of all U.S. passenger miles traveled,” Sam Abuelsamid of Navigant consulting says that Seba’s projections for shared autonomous vehicles are “ludicrous.” He said, “I think the RethinkX report is wildly optimistic on virtually all fronts.” Meanwhile, analysts at Deloitte, “who also believe shared autonomous transport will eventually win out, still push that point off well past mid-century.” And Boston-based consulting firm Bain “estimates says only 10% of new vehicles systems will be partly or fully automated by 2025.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Houston’s Limited Zoning Laws Reduced Harvey Damage.

In an opinion piece for U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18), George Mason University Mercatus Center Policy Research Manager Emily Hamilton argues that Houston would not have fared better after receiving four feet of rain had its zoning laws been more restrictive. Hamilton claims that the city’s “development policy isn’t as different as advertised from that of other major American cities,” adding, “In the ways it does differ, it may allow for denser urban development rather than causing more sprawl into flood-prone areas.” While some Houston laws for building structures and parking lots encourage suburban sprawl, the city reduced the minimum home lot size to 1,400 square feet in 1999, allowing more townhouses to be built downtown. Hamilton suggests that this policy has facilitated Houston’s rapid growth by reducing “pressure for development on the outskirts of the city,” which in term preserves the surrounding prairies that act as a “sponge” for rainfall.

Auto Safety Advocate: Americans Right To Be Concerned About Self-Driving Cars.

In a Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) op-ed, Center for Auto Safety Executive Director Jason Levine writes that although self-driving vehicles potentially represent the greatest step toward vehicular and pedestrian safety since the installation the air bag, Americans are right to be concerned about their adoption in the near future – an attitude reflected in a recent AAA poll showing 78 percent of respondents would not want to ride in an autonomous car. Levine argues that the Transportation Department’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is responsible for regulating vehicle policy, has maintained a lax enforcement of safety features in the past and recently weakened “an existing set of voluntary guidelines on autonomous vehicles.”

Michigan To Divest Power Plant, New Deep-Water Marine Terminal Expected.

U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) reports that last week the Michigan Public Service Commission approved a Consumer Energy request “to divest the B.C. Cobb plant in Muskegon” Consumers Energy is set to compensate Forsite Development $1 million to own the property. Forsite is expected to demolish the facility within two years after the deal is finalized. Forsite plans to redevelop the site as “a deep-water marine terminal on Muskegon Lake for cross-Lake Michigan shipping.”

Much Of Texas Power Grid Withstands Hurricane Harvey.

Scientific American Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Lott) reports that according to new data provided by the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) on Hurricane Harvey, more than 10,000 Megawatts of electrical generation capacity were disrupted by high winds and flooding. Despite the disruption, many of the power lines throughout the Texas Gulf Coast remained operational despite 130 mph winds. The state’s grid operator (ERCOT) met “customer electricity demand in those areas not impacted by inoperable power lines, in part because of cooler temperatures in the area,” which ranged in the 70’s and 80’s.

EIA Survey Shows Coal Power Plants Installed Mercury Controls To Meet Compliance Deadlines.

PennEnergy Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18) reports that EIA’s preliminary annual electric generator survey shows that “several coal-fired electricity generators in the United States installed mercury control equipment using activated carbon injection systems just prior to compliance deadlines.” The nature and timing of control additions “indicate a strategy to maintain the availability of affected coal-fired generators by requesting extensions to compliance deadlines and investing in flexible, low-cost environmental control technology.”

GE Working On Technology That Could Save $200 Billion Worth Of Power.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Hirtenstein) reports General Electric is working on a way “to use artificial intelligence in electricity grids, a technology that it expects will save $200 billion globally by improving efficiency.” Steven Martin, chief digital officer at GE’s energy connections business, is quoted saying, “We’re also putting a lot into the machine learning side. … We have a lot of people working on this.” The technology “would optimize how electricity flows in and out of storage devices such as batteries and points of consumption, in real time.”

California Lawmakers Agree To Spend $895 Million On Clean Vehicle Programs.

KXJZ-FM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Sacramento, CA (9/17, Bradford) reports California lawmakers have agreed to devote most of the $1.5 billion of funding generated by the state’s cap-and-trade program “to cutting pollution from the transportation sector.” Under measures passed Friday, the state “will spend $895 million on clean vehicle programs, especially replacing diesel engines in buses, agricultural equipment, and at ports.” Lawmakers also approved “more than $150 million for cleaner farming—including reducing methane from cows. Another $225 million goes to fighting wildfires.” Gov. Jerry Brown “is expected to sign the measures.”

The Imperial Valley (CA) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17) quotes Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia (D-Coachella) saying, “We were able to acquire $250 million in agricultural program investments, including renewable energy grants as well as vehicle and equipment rebates. The ability to infuse this magnitude of the state’s resources into the rural, agricultural communities I represent will result in enormous economic stimulants and public health benefits.” She added, “This bill package also makes significant strides to reduce vehicle emissions and improve air quality which is an issue that hits close to home. Imperial County is reported to have 12,000 children with asthma and more than double the state’s rate of young children’s hospital and emergency room visits for this respiratory illness.”

Justin Salters writes in the Bakersfield (CA) Californian Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, Salters, Subscription Publication) that state representatives in the State Senate and Assembly “wrapped up a legislative season on Friday,” but the year was “filled with legislation that hurts the middle class and working poor while doing little to substantively address the causes of poverty or provide opportunities for economic advancement.” Salters says “three of this year’s major legislative ‘accomplishments,’ i.e., transportation funding, Cap and Trade and housing, offer little relief for the Central Valley.” Legislators extended California’s signature “Cap and Trade” program, which he says “has helped accelerate an exodus of middle-class jobs from the state and an increased cost of energy.”

Monday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier announces Global Engineering Academic Challenge 2017
Elsevier, the information analytics business specialising in science and health, has announced that the Engineering Academic Challenge (EAC) 2017 will begin on September 18, 2017. The bi-annual five-week challenge enables engineering teachers and librarians around the world to integrate real-world problem-solving into their STEM education communities.
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 ALPSP Awards 2017 winners announced
The winners of the 2017 ALPSP Awards were announced at the ALPSP Conference Dinner on September 14.The ALPSP Council presented the 2017 ALPSP Award for Contribution to Scholarly Publishing to Sara Miller McCune, Founder and Executive Chairman, SAGE Publishing. Additionally, the judges announced two winners – Publons and SourceData from EMBO – for the ALPSP Awards for Innovation in Publishing.
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 Clarivate Analytics announces Dr. Jian Wang as winner of Eugene Garfield Award
Clarivate Analytics has announced the recipient of its first competition for the Eugene Garfield Award for Innovation in Citation Analysis, at a memorial symposium for Dr. Eugene Garfield, to commemorate and celebrate his contributions to the field of information retrieval and scientometrics. Dr. Jian Wang, Assistant Professor at the Science Based Business Program, Faculty of Science, Leiden University in the Netherlands, was selected for the award among many creative, high-quality applications.
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 Publishers join NLM initiative to launch Emergency Access Initiative, granting free access to books and journals for libraries impacted by hurricanes Harvey and Irma
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters.
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 Hindawi and AAAS sign publishing partnership
Hindawi has announced the signing of a publishing partnership agreement with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Hindawi will support AAAS by providing post-acceptance publishing services for AAAS’s new Science Partner Journal publishing program. AAAS anticipates its first partner journal will launch in early 2018.
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 SPIE Digital Library moves to new site with improved, agile functionality
Scholarly publisher SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, has announced the move of theSPIE Digital Library on August 15 to a new and substantially enhanced website. Developed internally by SPIE to create an improved user experience and incorporate a number of enhancements and new features, the website housing and distributing SPIE’s conference proceedings, journals, and eBooks has been completely redesigned and re-engineered.
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 Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Tony Ross-Hellauer (Open peer review: bringing transparency, accountability, and inclusivity to the peer review process); Phil Davis (Do We Need A Self-Citation Index?); Josh Clark (Altmetric at the University of Surrey); Karin Wulf (Does Born-Digital Mean Rethinking Peer Review?); and Arlyana Saliman (Scientific journal credibility: Would the R-factor be the way to go?). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

NASA’s Cassini Mission Comes To A Close.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, A1, Chang, Subscription Publication), in a front page story, reports that the 20-year mission of NASA’s Cassini spacecraft came to a close Friday when, as planned, the probe relayed its final signal before slipping into Saturn’s atmosphere and disintegrating. The Times explains that Cassini “stretched far beyond the original four-year plan, sending back multitudes of striking photographs, solving some mysteries and upending prevailing notions about the solar system with completely unexpected discoveries” during its 13 years spent in orbit. Thomas H. Zurbuchen, NASA’s associate administrator for science, is cited saying, “Cassini is really one of those quintessential missions from NASA. … It hasn’t just changed what we know about Saturn, but how we think about the world.” The story emphasizes the sad undertone of the mission’s end for many of those who contributed to it – “some of whom had spent decades” on the project.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Kaplan), The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Hernandez, Hotz, Kapadia, Subscription Publication), ABC World News Tonight (9/15, story 12, 0:20, Muir), CBS Evening News (9/15, story 9, 1:50, Mason), NBC Nightly News (9/15, story 13, 2:00, Holt) also report on the mission and its conclusion.

WPost: The Cassini Mission Embodies The Best Of Humanity. The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15) writes in an editorial piece that the Cassini mission “marks a profound accomplishment for humanity and science” and “In many ways…embodies the best of our species.” The Washington Post explains that 27 countries contributed to the mission that has opened the door to questions about microbial life on moons in Saturn’s system and organic compounds – the building blocks of life on Earth – on Enceladus. The story asserts that those “who worked on the Cassini mission should be commended for their decades-long work” as “People across the globe will see the images and read about their discoveries for generations.”

Higher Education

NSF Gives University Of Montana $300,000 Grant To Boost Native American STEM Education.

KSEN-AM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Shelby, MT (9/16) reports that the National Science Foundation has given the University of Montana a $300,000 grant “to launch a pilot project to enhance American Indian participation in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.”

Idaho Engineer Taking Over University Of Maryland Center For Environmental Science.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17, Dance) reports that University of Idaho Professor Peter Goodwin “has spent much of his career engineering ways to restore salmon populations in dammed Pacific Northwest rivers or analyzing the downstream effects of water supply management decisions in drought-stressed California.” But on Monday, Goodwin will begin focusing on the Chesapeake Bay when he takes “over the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, home to the preeminent research on” the bay.

Foreign Students Increasingly Choosing Canada Over The US.

The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/16, Krantz) reports on a trend for foreign students to choose schools in Canada for their study, rather than in the US, due in part to “what many see as the demonization of foreigners and immigrants and a new wave of racism.” At the University of Toronto, numbers of entering foreign students increased 21 percent from last year, while the number of international students in the country as a whole has increased 92 percent since 2008. The article cites “political uncertainty,” and “the tumultuous climate [Trump’s] election ushered in,” as factors, especially as compared to the more “welcoming atmosphere” found in Canada.

NYTimes Analysis: Black, Hispanic College Freshmen More Underrepresented In 2015 Than 1980.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17, Goldstein, Subscription Publication) reports that mid the continuing “debate and legal wrangling over whether college affirmative action efforts are too aggressive, black and Hispanic freshmen were more underrepresented at the nation’s top schools in 2015 than they were in 1980,” according to a Times analysis. The Times adds that “many admissions officials say that affirmative action as it is traditionally understood – taking race into consideration when assessing applications – falls short as a diversity strategy, and that further-reaching efforts are needed to recruit a student body that even comes close to reflecting the country’s demographics.”

College Enrollment Falls For Fifth Straight Year.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17, Selingo) reports that according to the National Student Clearinghouse, “fewer students are going to college this fall, as enrollment in higher education has fallen for five straight years.” The Post reports that the group says around “2.4 million fewer students are enrolled than at the recent peak in 2011.” The Post describes a number of contributing factors to the decline in enrollment such as reduced numbers of high school graduates, shifting population, and “the rise of alternative types of higher-education credentials in an age when we always need to be learning.”

From ASEE
ASEE Board Reorganization – Feedback Needed
ASEE ED Norman Fortenberry presents rationale on a proposed reorganization of the ASEE Board of Directors. Please leave your feedback (ASEE member login required).

NEW Podcast
One energy solution may be found in looking toward the ocean…not necessarily what you’d expect from researchers at land-locked Penn State.


FREE Action on Diversity Webinar: Empathy in Engineering — Why it Matters
Tune in 9/20 at 2:00 PM, ET for a FREE 90-minute webinar on empathy in engineering! Drs. Jo Walther and Nicki Sochacka will explore how faculty can encourage empathetic thoughts and actions in the classroom, and why empathy should be a core skill for future engineers. Dr. Shari Miller will offer her unique perspective on empathy as an expert in the field of social work Register today.

Research and Development

Polaris Testing Two Driverless Electric Cars In Detroit.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/16) reports that Polaris Industries is testing two electric vehicles “outfitted with autonomous-driving software and sensors” in Detroit in October. The vehicles “will have human drivers on board. But unless there is an emergency, the actual driving will be left to the machines.”

New Mexico Engineers Study Termites To Learn Building Strategies.

The Las Cruces (NM) Sun-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/16) reports that New Mexico State University College of Engineering Dean Lakshmi Reddi “has always admired nature” and “is trying to understand biological systems to engineer energy efficient methods for cooling and heating modern structures, with the help of a grant from the National Science Foundation.” The piece reports that termites have “the amazing ability to build soil-based towers that maintain steady internal temperatures of 86 degrees.”

Ford Invests $5 Million Into Willow Run Autonomous Vehicle Test Site.

The Detroit Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Lawrence) reported Ford Motor Co. on Friday announced it “is investing $5 million into the American Center for Mobility in Ypsilanti Township, becoming the second automaker to donate to the driverless vehicle test site and capping a week of news on the self-driving car front.” The Free Press stated that the donation will make Ford a “founder-level” sponsor as well as “a member of a government-industry team developing the autonomous vehicle testing grounds on the site of the former Willow Run bomber plant.” In a release, Ken Washington, vice president of research and advanced engineering and chief technology officer at Ford, said, “The work done at Willow Run will help drive mobility solutions across the globe. … This is an investment in the safe, rapid testing and deployment of transformative technology that will help improve people’s lives.”

Canadian Researchers Develop Safety Technology To Monitor Driver Focus.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Kunkle) reported researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada developed technology that “can tell if a driver’s texting or doing something else that’s a distraction from driving, said Fakhri Karray, a UW professor of electrical and computer engineering.” According to the Post, “The technology uses cameras and artificial intelligence to follow the movements of a person’s head, hands and other movements to assess whether a person is paying attention. The machine then assesses the degree of inattention and what sort of safety threat it poses.”

UK-Developed Dragonfire Laser Cannon Unveiled At DSEI 2017.

The Engineer (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) reports that the turret of a laser cannon “being produced under a £30 million contract for the UK Ministry of Defence” was unveiled at the DSEI conference this week in London. The 50kW Dragonfire directed energy system is being developed by a consortium of companies including “Qinetiq, Leonardo-Finmeccanica, Arke, BAE Systems, Marshall and GK.” The system will test a demonstrator “on UK ranges in 2018, culminating in a major demonstration in 2019.”

Facebook Will Explore AI Research In New Montreal Lab.

MIT Technology Review Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/16, Knight) reports that Facebook said “it is tapping into Canada’s impressive supply of artificial-intelligence talent and expertise by creating a major AI research center in Montreal” that will be devoted to “reinforcement learning.” The goal is to produce “more coherent and useful virtual assistants,” which the Review says means that “the first genuinely impressive AI assistant may well have a Canadian accent.” The piece adds that “several big recent advances in AI can be traced back to Canadian research labs.”

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15) reports Facebook’s lab will be led by Joelle Pineau, co-director of the Reasoning and Learning Lab at McGill University. The newest lab “will be Facebook’s fourth, after sites in Palo Alto, New York, and Paris, and joins similar AI research efforts in the city from Microsoft Corp and Alphabet’s Google.”

Workforce

NYTimes A1: Lurid Lawsuit’s Settlement Illustrates Silicon Valley’s Sexual Misconduct.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, A1, Streitfeld, Subscription Publication), on its front page, reports that a lawsuit brought against virtual reality tech startup, Upload, by its then digital media manager Elizabeth Scott, has been settled for an undisclosed sum and pushed aside by remaining employees, according to two people familiar with the situation. The case, involving allegations of sexual misconduct has reportedly had minimal impact on the company save for a tone that is “a bit more muted” at the events which led to the behaviors in question, as well as the departure of Ms. Scott, who was fired, and 12 employees who quit in solidarity but remained quiet about their grievances. Ms. Scott was reportedly turned away from various VR companies once they discovered she had previously filed a suit against Upload, but has since secured employment.

Global Developments

Fitbit Launches Largest European R&D Center.

ZDNet Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Fiscutean) reported Fitbit has “opened its largest European research and development center in Bucharest,” Romania – home to Vector Watch, a startup the activity tracker firm recently acquired. The new Fitbit “R&D team is formed around the existing 30 Vector employees, all of whom have remained onboard,” and the new facility will be headed by former Vector CTO Andrei Pitis. According to ZDNet, Fitbit, which is looking to hire local techies, has launched the “R&D center hoping to capitalize on some of the technologies Vector Watch has developed and the team’s expertise.”

Industry News

UPS Becomes First US Customers Of Mitsubishi Fuso Electric Trucks.

In continuing coverage, the AutoIndustriya Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/18, De Guzman) reports that the Mitsubishi Fuso eCanter electric truck made its debut in the US with UPS. Carlton Rose, president of Global Fleet Maintenance and Engineering at UPS, said, “At UPS, we constantly evaluate and deploy advanced technologies that enable sustainable, innovative solutions for our fleet. Electric trucks make our fleet both cleaner and quieter, adding to our already more than 8,500 alternative drivetrain vehicles in service today. We have a long-standing global relationship with Daimler, and we welcome the opportunity to trial the Fuso eCanter as UPS continues to realize the benefits of electric trucks.” The article adds that UPS will take three eCanters, while five more will be given to non-profit organizations in New York.

Business Green (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17) also reports on the story.

Engineering and Public Policy

WSJournal: Solar Panel Tariffs Will Hurt US Solar Industry.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Subscription Publication) editorializes that a petition by two solar companies to the International Trade Commission requesting tariffs on foreign-made solar panels will only serve to make solar energy less competitive in the energy market. The Journal warns that the tariff would hurt the US solar industry as a whole, and suggests that US-based manufacturers should focus on adding value to foreign-made panels via innovations like unique framing systems or automated sun tracking technology.

M&Ms Launches “Fans Of Wind” Campaign.

Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Bach) reports M&Ms has launched a “Fans of Wind” campaign, which informs consumers “about sustainable ways to fight climate change, while highlighting the ways Mars is already doing so.” The imitative is part of Mars’ “Sustainable in a Generation” commitment, which aims for “zero net greenhouse gas emissions from direct operations by 2040.”

Trump Administration Pursuing Change To Rules Governing Coal-Fired Power Plants

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Cama) reports that the EPA “could put out a preliminary proposal for a rule to replace the Clean Power Plan” as soon as next moth. The article adds that the president and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt “have long been critics of the Obama climate rule.” The Hill writes that “the regulation is likely to focus solely on the carbon reductions that can be achieved at the coal-fired power plants themselves – mainly improving the efficiency of coal-fired generators, an approach known as ‘inside the fenceline’” that differs from the Obama-era rules’ approach.

FERC Overrules New York’s Millennium Pipeline Water Permit Denial.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15) reports the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Friday overruled New York’s denial of a water permit for the Millennium natural gas pipeline. Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, DiSavino) reports energy companies on Friday praised the decision. However, Sierra Club Atlantic Chapter Director Roger Downs called the decision “an insult to New Yorkers and our right to protect our communities and our water,” adding that FERC has no right to override the state’s decision. Similarly, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation said it will review the decision “and will consider all legal options to protect public health and the environment.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

“Makerspace” Movement A Growing Trend Among Maryland District Elementary Schools.

Mountain View Elementary is the first school in Maryland’s Prince William County Public Schools district to launch a “makerspace,” which the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17, Hunley) describes as “any setting where tools and other resources are shared” and “self-directed, experiential and hands-on learning by students” is encouraged. Mountain View launched its makerspace four years ago, and it now features “hot-glue guns, drills, a 3-D printer and a 3-D scanner, among other tools.” Principal Adriane Harrison said teachers and staff members noticed English-language learners and students in special education programs have particularly benefited from the makerspace. Since Mountain View launched its makerspace, several other Prince William County elementary schools have followed. This year, the district’s Minnieville Elementary School, where about 70 percent of students are English-language learners and 70 percent are economically disadvantaged, launched its own makerspace “to give students an opportunity to use resources that nurture creativity.”

Texas Girl Scouts Assemble 3-D Prosthetic Hands For Disabled Children.

KRBC-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Abilene, TX (9/17) reports online that the “Girls Scouts of Central Texas partnered with Wayside Sci-Tech Preparatory School and EOS North America, an industrial 3D printing company,” for a service project on Saturday through the Helping Hands program. Under the guidance of ninth grade Wayside Sci-Tech engineering students, the girls assembled “15 child-sized prosthetic hands using 3D-printers from EOS North America.” The group will donate the completed prosthetic hands “to e-Nable, a non-profit that matches 3D-printed prosthetic limbs to people in need of upper-limb devices around the world,” for use by disabled children. The groups said the event was established “to teach girls that fields in STEM can allow them to make a positive impact on their community.”

California District’s “Math Academy” Advances Students At Least Four Years Ahead Academically.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17, Mathews) profiles the “Math Academy” in California’s Pasadena Unified School District, where 69 percent of students are from low-income families. Initiated by Jason Roberts, the program accelerates “students at least four years above their grade level.” Students in the program finish “high school math, including calculus, in middle school and devote high school to more complex subjects: multivariable calculus, abstract algebra, probability, game theory and other college subjects.” The Post says Roberts’ “plan appears to be unique for a public school district, and its pace is not the only startling feature,” as “Roberts and his wife, Sandy,” both have “deep backgrounds in math.” The Post says the only other program akin to Math Academy in the nation “is the University of Minnesota’s Talented Youth Mathematics Program,” which serves about 75 middle and high schools.

Indiana Teacher Introduces Middle School Students To Computer Science.

The Times of Northwest Indiana Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/17) profiles Crystal Kistler, a seventh grade teacher at Hobart Middle School in northwestern Indiana, a region that has started “offering computer coding to children as young as the elementary school level.” This fall, Kistler started teaching “Computer Science for Innovators and Makers,” a class that implements “computer science state standards that make sure students at the middle school level learn how to code or program computers.” Kistler said that she “has many plans for the 162 students during the nine-week course before they switch to another science class, including working with the Valparaiso-based Center for Workforce Innovations that will arrange for the students to visit a local manufacturer.” Hobart “Superintendent Peggy Buffington said the changes in 2016 reflect the ever-changing science content and underlying premise that science education should be an inquiry-based and hands-on experience.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 110 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 110 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 110 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Intestinal Lactobacillus in health and disease, a driver or just along for the ride? Heeney, D.D., Gareau, M.G., Marco, M.L. 2018 Current Opinion in Biotechnology ,
49 pp. 140 – 147 .
2 . To engraft or not to engraft: an ecological framework for gut microbiome modulation with live microbes Walter, J., Maldonado-Gómez, M.X., Martínez, I. 2018 Current Opinion in Biotechnology ,
49 pp. 129 – 139 .
3 . Variability of indoor fungal microbiome of green and non-green low-income homes in Cincinnati, Ohio Coombs, K., Taft, D., Ward, D.V., Green, B.J., Chew, G.L., Shamsaei, B., Meller, J., Indugula, R., Reponen, T. 2018 Science of the Total Environment ,
610-611 pp. 212 – 218 .
4 . Structure and thermal expansion of Lu<inf>2</inf>O<inf>3</inf> and Yb<inf>2</inf>O<inf>3</inf> up to the melting points Pavlik, A., Ushakov, S.V., Navrotsky, A., Benmore, C.J., Weber, R.J.K. 2017 Journal of Nuclear Materials ,
495 pp. 385 – 391 .
5 . Palladium membranes applications in reaction systems for hydrogen separation and purification: A review Rahimpour, M.R., Samimi, F., Babapoor, A., Tohidian, T., Mohebi, S. 2017 Chemical Engineering and Processing: Process Intensification ,
121 pp. 24 – 49 .
6 . Growth and morphology of Pb phases on Ge(111) Sato, Y., Chiang, S. 2017 Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces and Films ,
35 ( 6 ) , art. no. 061405
7 . The Effects of an Oxygen Scavenger and Coconut Water on Equine Sperm Cryopreservation London, K.T., Christensen, B.W., Scott, C.J., Klooster, K., Kass, P.H., Dujovne, G.A., Meyers, S.A. 2017 Journal of Equine Veterinary Science ,
58 pp. 51 – 57 .
8 . Digitalization of Human Operations in the Age of Cyber Manufacturing: Sensorimotor Analysis of Manual Grinding Performance Bales, G.L., Das, J., Tsugawa, J., Linke, B., Kong, Z. 2017 Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Transactions of the ASME,
139 ( 10 ) , art. no. 101011
9 . Peripheral Blood Biomarkers Associated With Toxicity and Treatment Characteristics After <sup>131</sup>I- Metaiodobenzylguanidine Therapy in Patients With Neuroblastoma Campbell, K., Karski, E.E., Olow, A., Edmondson, D.A., Kohlgruber, A.C., Coleman, M., Haas-Kogan, D.A., Matthay, K.K., DuBois, S.G. 2017 International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics ,
99 ( 2 ) pp. 468 – 475 .
10 . Race/ethnicity and marijuana use in the United States: Diminishing differences in the prevalence of use, 2006–2015 Keyes, K.M., Wall, M., Feng, T., Cerdá, M., Hasin, D.S. 2017 Drug and Alcohol Dependence ,
179 pp. 379 – 386 .
11 . Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy presenting as Alzheimer’s-type dementia Sandoval-Rodríguez, V., Cansino-Torres, M.A., Sáenz-Farret, M., Castañeda-Cisneros, G., Moreno, G., Zúñiga-Ramírez, C. 2017 Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders ,
17 pp. 230 – 233 .
12 . Evaluating the Toxicity Reduction With Computed Tomographic Ventilation Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy Faught, A.M., Miyasaka, Y., Kadoya, N., Castillo, R., Castillo, E., Vinogradskiy, Y., Yamamoto, T. 2017 International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics ,
99 ( 2 ) pp. 325 – 333 .
13 . Stimulating Innate Immunity to Enhance Radiation Therapy–Induced Tumor Control Baird, J.R., Monjazeb, A.M., Shah, O., McGee, H., Murphy, W.J., Crittenden, M.R., Gough, M.J. 2017 International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics ,
99 ( 2 ) pp. 362 – 373 .
14 . Clinical benefit of antiangiogenic therapy in advanced and metastatic chondrosarcoma Jones, R.L., Katz, D., Loggers, E.T., Davidson, D., Rodler, E.T., Pollack, S.M. 2017 Medical Oncology ,
34 ( 10 ) , art. no. 167
15 . Evaluation of the immunocrit method to detect failure of passively acquired immunity in dairy calves Thompson, K.A., Rayburn, M.C., Chigerwe, M. 2017 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ,
251 ( 6 ) pp. 702 – 705 .
16 . Theriogenology question of the month Boye, J.K., Byrne, B.A., Alex, C.E., Affolter, V.K., Christensen, B.W., Dujovne, G.A. 2017 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ,
251 ( 6 ) pp. 657 – 660 .
17 . Complexes of Ni(i): A “rare” oxidation state of growing importance Lin, C.-Y., Power, P.P. 2017 Chemical Society Reviews ,
46 ( 17 ) pp. 5347 – 5399 .
18 . A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice Roberts, M.N., Wallace, M.A., Tomilov, A.A., Zhou, Z., Marcotte, G.R., Tran, D., Perez, G., Gutierrez-Casado, E., Koike, S., Knotts, T.A., Imai, D.M., Griffey, S.M., Kim, K., Hagopian, K., Haj, F.G., Baar, K., Cortopassi, G.A., Ramsey, J.J., Lopez-Dominguez, J.A. 2017 Cell Metabolism ,
26 ( 3 ) pp. 539 – 546.e5 .
19 . Synthesis of Benzodihydrofurans by Asymmetric C−H Insertion Reactions of Donor/Donor Rhodium Carbenes Lamb, K.N., Squitieri, R.A., Chintala, S.R., Kwong, A.J., Balmond, E.I., Soldi, C., Dmitrenko, O., Castiñeira Reis, M., Chung, R., Addison, J.B., Fettinger, J.C., Hein, J.E., Tantillo, D.J., Fox, J.M., Shaw, J.T. 2017 Chemistry – A European Journal ,
23 ( 49 ) pp. 11843 – 11855 .
20 . The value of using measurements of geomagnetic field in addition to irradiance and sea surface temperature to estimate geolocations of tagged aquatic animals Klimley, A.P., Flagg, M., Hammerschlag, N., Hearn, A. 2017 Animal Biotelemetry ,
5 ( 1 ) , art. no. 19
21 . Pathobiology of the 129: Stat1 <sup>-/-</sup> mouse model of human age-related ER-positive breast cancer with an immune infiltrate-excluded phenotype Mori, H., Chen, J.Q., Cardiff, R.D., Pénzváltó, Z., Hubbard, N.E., Schuetter, L., Hovey, R.C., Trott, J.F., Borowsky, A.D. 2017 Breast Cancer Research ,
19 ( 1 ) , art. no. 102
22 . Outbreaks of bovine herpesvirus 2 infections in calves causing ear and facial skin lesions Watanabe, T.T.N., Moeller, R.B., Crossley, B.M., Blanchard, P.C. 2017 Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation ,
29 ( 5 ) pp. 686 – 690 .
23 . Wet years have more caterpillars: interacting roles of plant litter and predation by ants Karban, R., Grof-Tisza, P., Holyoak, M. 2017 Ecology ,
98 ( 9 ) pp. 2370 – 2378 .
24 . Heartburn or heart attack? A mimic of MI Bowman, W.S., Farid, A., Aronowitz, P. 2017 Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine ,
84 ( 9 ) pp. 664 – 665 .
25 . Timing of stressors alters interactive effects on a coastal foundation species Bible, J.M., Cheng, B.S., Chang, A.L., Ferner, M.C., Wasson, K., Zabin, C.J., Latta, M., Sanford, E., Deck, A., Grosholz, E.D. 2017 Ecology ,
98 ( 9 ) pp. 2468 – 2478
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Allscripts certifies Elsevier’s Interactive Patient Education as part of Allscripts Developer Program
Elsevier, the information analytics business specializing in science and health, has announced that Allscripts has certified Elsevier’s Interactive Patient Education as part of the award-winning Allscripts Developer Program (ADP). Elsevier’s Interactive Patient Education for Infobutton enables Allscripts ambulatory electronic health record (EHR) users to access patient-friendly, evidence-based education content within their workflow.
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 Wiley launches new data sharing and citation policies to improve transparency in research
Publisher John Wiley and Sons, Inc. has announced the launch of new data sharing and citation policies that will be implemented across all participating Wiley journals. Sharing data enables researchers to reuse experimental results and supports the creation of new work built on previous findings. These new policies will improve the efficiencies of the research process supporting the critical goals of transparency and reproducibility.
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 Building Inclusivity in Publishing conference to highlight action currently being taken to improve diversity across the publishing industry
The London Book Fair and the Publishers Association have announced that the Building Inclusivity in Publishing conference will return for a second year on November 13, 2017, following the great success of the inaugural conference in 2016. Spanning the entire publishing process, from author to reader, this year’s conference will revisit some of the pledges made at last year’s conference and encourage delegates to make new pledges.
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 Karger titles receive ‘Highly Commended’ prizes at the 2017 BMA Medical Book Awards
Three Karger publications were awarded the ‘Highly Commended’ prize 2017 of the British Medical Association’s (BMA) Medical Book Awards in the categories Internal Medicine, Paediatrics, and Medicine. The award ceremony was held recently in London. The publications, SickKids – Handbook of Pediatric Thrombosis and Hemostasis, HIV and Aging, and Itch – Management in Clinical Practice were highly commended by the British Medical Association Book Award.
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 HighWire Press announces platform-wide rollout of Campus-Activated Subscriber Access
HighWire Press, Inc., the strategic partner and platform provider for world-leading scholarly publishers and societies, has announced the platform-wide rollout of Campus-Activated Subscriber Access (CASA) on its Intelligent Platform, in cooperation with Google Scholar. CASA enables seamless off-campus and mobile access to subscribed scholarly content. With CASA, off-campus and mobile users may access their library’s subscriptions just as easily as when they are on campus.
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 American Society of Nephrology joins AggregagentTM
ACCUCOMS has announced that the journals of the American Society of Nephrology will become available via ACCUCOMS’ Aggregagent. ACCUCOMS and the American Society of Nephrology have worked together in several territories around the globe for many years. The journals will strengthen Aggregagent Collections in the medical field.
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 Reprints Desk and RedLink partner to provide scholarly article subscription intelligence
Research Solutions, Inc., a pioneer in providing cloud-based solutions for scientific research, has announced that its wholly-owned subsidiary Reprints Desk has entered into an agreement with RedLink, a rapidly growing provider of business analytics to academic publishers and libraries. Under the terms of the agreement, Reprints Desk may now offer RedLink’s ‘Library Dashboard’ product to its corporate customers in the scientific, technology, and medical research industries.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

EPA To Reexamine Coal Ash Waste Regulations For Power Plants.

The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Siciliano) reports the EPA is considering revising “11 pieces of an Obama administration rule governing how coal ash waste is handled from power plants.” EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt signaled yesterday “that the agency is granting two petitions from the utility industry to review the final rule governing coal combustion residuals, or coal ash, as a nonhazardous form of waste.” The move follows an announcement Wednesday “by the EPA that it will delay for two years the Obama-era rule on handling toxic wastewater from coal plants. Both rules are seen by the industry as part of an increasing regulatory burden on coal plant operators.”

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) reports the agency “said it is in the ‘public’s interest to reconsider specific provisions’ of the regulation and figure out how to amend it to give states more leeway in how they tailor their permit programs to comply with the rule.” In a press release the EPA said, “EPA is not committing to changing any part of the rule, or agreeing with the merits of the petition – the Agency is simply granting petitions to reconsider specific provisions.” The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Dennis, Eilperin) reports green groups “were quick to criticize Pruitt’s latest decision as another nod to special interests.” The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Henry) and the Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Puko, Subscription Publication) also provide coverage of this story.

Higher Education

UC Berkeley Student Effuses Over Advancements In 3D Metal Printing.

Writing about 3D printing for the Huffington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14), UC Berkeley EECS student and developer Nikhil Reddy says “we now have a 3D metal printing process that’s faster, safer, and cheaper than its existing counterparts, and it’s going to flip traditional means on their heads.” The startup Desktop Metal is working on what could “transmute metal printing from an extravagant, rigid platform into a reliable solution that’s 20 times cheaper and 100 times faster,” with 3D metal printers targeted at “rapid prototyping for engineering teams, and a production measure for large-scale manufacturing timelines.” Reddy calls the advent of 3D metal printing “the birth of a market equalizer, one that promises to bring even the underdogs into competition with behemoths, and that is a damn cool guarantee.”

Collapsed For-Profit Accreditor Seeking New Life Under Trump.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) reports that Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools President Michelle Edwards says the group, which “the Obama administration terminated,” is in “talks with the Trump administration to bring the organization back to life.” The accreditor, “which was accused of approving too many dishonest for-profit schools…has ‘begun communicating with the Department of Education about the meaningful changes made to date and our plans for maintaining and expanding those reforms in the future,’” Edwards says.

Fidelity Investments Launches New Program For Employers To Pay Student Loans.

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Friedman) reports that Fidelity Investments “is offering employers a new program to help employees pay off undergraduate or graduate student loans more quickly.” Fidelity’s Student Debt Employer Contribution program “will help employers make after-tax contributions towards their employees’ student loans.”

From ASEE
ASEE Board Reorganization – Feedback Needed
ASEE ED Norman Fortenberry presents rationale on a proposed reorganization of the ASEE Board of Directors. Please leave your feedback (ASEE member login required).

NEW Podcast
One energy solution may be found in looking toward the ocean…not necessarily what you’d expect from researchers at land-locked Penn State.


FREE Action on Diversity Webinar: Empathy in Engineering — Why it Matters
Tune in 9/20 at 2:00 PM, ET for a FREE 90-minute webinar on empathy in engineering! Drs. Jo Walther and Nicki Sochacka will explore how faculty can encourage empathetic thoughts and actions in the classroom, and why empathy should be a core skill for future engineers. Dr. Shari Miller will offer her unique perspective on empathy as an expert in the field of social work Register today.

Research and Development

Researchers Claim To Discover Android Malware Outbreak.

Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Hackett) reports, “Security researchers claim to have discovered one of the biggest outbreaks of Android malware ever to sneak its way from the GooglePlay Store onto people’s devices.” Fortune says, “The campaign consisted of dozens of malicious apps that sent fraudulent premium text messages and charged people for fake services, according to researchers at Check Point Software Technologies.” At least 50 apps “featured an advanced form of the malware that used ‘packing,’ a technique that compresses code with encryption, effectively masking it” and allowing it to evade Google security filters.

University Of Maryland Launches New Drone Test Facility.

WJLA-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Washington (9/13) reports that the University of Maryland A. James Clark School of Engineering has opened “an outdoor test site for drones…made of netting, so it allows for the unmanned aircraft to be tested in weather conditions.” Dubbed the “Fearless Flight Facility,” the resource s compliant with FAA regulations.

Unmanned Aerial Online Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/13) reports that the facility “will serve as a critical nexus between the Clark School of Engineering’s College Park labs and the UAS test site in Maryland’s St. Mary’s County, says the university.” The piece quotes Clark School of Engineering Dean Darryll Pines saying, “The University of Maryland continues to make incredible strides in autonomy and robotics. Facilities like this one provide the real-world testing conditions that enable innovative breakthroughs. F3 allows us to pursue an aggressive UAS research agenda that would not be possible without the protection of a netted enclosure.”

NSF Gives California Universities $8 Million For Work On Bionic Suit For Paralyzed Patients.

The Los Angeles Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Subscription Publication) reports that the National Science Foundation has given USC’s Keck School of Medicine, UC Irvine, and Caltech a Cyber-Physical Systems Frontier grant for $8 million to “fund the development of a fully implantable brain-machine interface device that could restore the ability to walk and restore sensation to the lower body, allowing users to “feel” while they walk.” The technology “will transmit commands to a robotic exoskeleton for walking that will then transmit sensory information back to the brain.”

Study: Light, Water Could Improve Perovskite Solar Cell Efficiency.

The Huffington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Deaton) reports the last decade “has seen a radical drop in the price of solar panels, driven largely by advances in manufacturing and installation.” New research published in the inaugural issue of the journal Joule “suggests that light and water could be used to make perovskite solar cells markedly more efficient.”

Workforce

Google Hit With Gender Discrimination Lawsuit.

The CBS Evening News (9/14, story 12, 0:15, Mason) reported that “three women who used to work for Google sued the company today for discrimination,” claiming that Google “pays women less than men for similar work and assigns female workers jobs less likely to lead to promotions.”

NBC Nightly News (9/14, story 6, 1:45, Holt) reported that the lawsuit accuses Google “of paying women less than their male counterparts and also denying them promotions.” NBC (Kent) added that three former employees, Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease and Kelli Wisuri, “say Google’s failure to pay female employees the same for substantially similar work has been and is willful.” In an email to NBC News, Google “denied the claim, saying, we disagree with the central allegations. We have extensive systems in place to ensure that we pay fairly. If we ever see individual discrepancies or problems, we work to fix them.” NBC added that “Google’s workforce is made up of 69 percent men and 31 percent women,” and that “earlier this year, the Labor Department sued Google, also alleging compensation data revealed systemic compensation disparities against women across the workforce.” Google “has also denied those allegations.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) reports that the lawsuit “follows a federal labor investigation that made a preliminary finding of systemic pay discrimination among the 21,000 employees at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California. The initial stages of the review found women earned less than men in nearly every job classification.”

Industry News

Oil Majors Enter Competition Over Electric Vehicle Charging Stations.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/15, Reuters) reports that in Europe, there is high competition between “power utilities, tech start-ups and oil majors” fighting to “establish themselves as the dominant players in the fast-growing business of charging stations.” The competing parties are involved in a “bit of a landgrab now to win this sector,” says Tim Payne, chief executive of British charging start-up InstaVolt. Among the oil majors, BP and Shell have both “announced plans or launched pilot projects for EV charging,” although analysts note that it is unlikely either would become “serious contenders for a business that would effectively curb demand for their chief product: oil.” A Shell spokeswoman “said it did not make economic sense yet to equip petrol stations fully with EV charging points.”

Engineering and Public Policy

California Lawmakers To Vote Friday On Proposal To Achieve 100% Clean Energy BY 2045.

NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Sommer) reports that “California lawmakers must vote by the end of the day Friday on the most ambitious clean energy goal in the country: 100 percent clean energy by 2045.” The article states that while Hawaii has already set “its own 100 percent goal,” California “uses about 30 times more electricity than Hawaii and is the fifth largest economy in the world.”

Author: Man-Made Earthquakes Pose Greatest Risk To Cushing’s Oil Infrastructure.

Writing in Politico Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Miles), Kathryn Miles, the author of “Quakeland: On the Road To America’s Next Devastating Earthquake,” says that two weeks after Hurricane Harvey made landfall and oil refining hit record lows, “six key refineries remain shut down and an additional 11 are either struggling to come back on line or operating at a significantly reduced rate.” That slowdown “has shifted oil pressures in other places, too. And none may be quite as vulnerable as the tank farms in Cushing, Oklahoma,” a location that has been designated “critical infrastructure” because it is “the nexus of 14 major pipelines, including Keystone.” But the “biggest potential cause of that incapacitation” in Cushing is earthquakes, swarms of which “began occurring about five years ago, when wastewater injection and other fracking-related activities changed the seismic face of Oklahoma in dramatic fashion.” Discussing “regulating the ability of the tanks to withstand an earthquake,” Miles says that “what standards do exist are created by the American Petroleum Institute, a national trade organization representing the oil and gas industry. And the standards are not overly rigorous, say seismologists.”

DOE Invests $50 Million In Projects To Increase Grid Resiliency.

Greentech Media Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, St. John, Subscription Publication) reports the Department of Energy on Tuesday “announced $50 million in funding for projects” to modernize the electric grid, with a focus on distributed energy and grid intelligence. The article reports that while these projects “won’t be able to stop a hurricane or prevent hackers from trying to disrupt the grid. … they could play a role in keeping the grid running amidst storms or cyberattacks, or by helping it recover after an outage.” The article mentions the Grid Resilience and Intelligence Platform, which received a $6 million grant. The project’s partners include Tesla and Southern California Edison.

Decentralized Energy Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) also reports.

Energy Trade Groups Agree With DOE Findings On Need For Diverse Energy Mix.

DailyEnergyInsider Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Randolph) reports energy sector trade groups wrote a joint letter to Congress on Thursday “that largely expressed agreement with the findings of a recent U.S. Department of Energy report on electricity markets, which highlighted the need for a diverse energy mix in order to provide reliable and electricity to customers.” The group of industry representatives “from the electric, petroleum, nuclear, wind and hydropower sectors,…sent the letter to members of the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee.” The letter said “that the trade organizations agreed with several findings and recommendations of the DOE Staff Report to the Secretary on Electricity Markets and Reliability, which Energy Secretary Rick Perry ordered in April to assess the impact of federal policies on energy markets and the early retirement of coal and nuclear plants.”

Transmission Line Project To Connect Wind Energy From Wyoming To Southwest.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) reports “construction on transmission lines to connect energy generated from wind farms in southern Wyoming” to states in the southwestern US “is planned to begin in 2019.” The TransWest Express Transmission Project is planning “to build 730 miles of transmission lines with 3,000-megawatt capacity.” The transmission “lines would connect from a terminal outside Rawlins, Wyoming, and run through northwest Colorado and Utah to end at another terminal near Las Vegas” providing access to “markets in California, Nevada and Arizona.”

Indiana Solar Nonprofit Says It Won’t Be Able To Meet Demand Of Program.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14) reports that Solar Indiana Renewable Energy Network, a group which gives homeowners a discount for getting solar panels, “says it won’t be able to meet the demand for that discount before a new Indiana law limiting compensation for solar power takes effect.” The group “says a vendor expects by year’s end to finish installing solar panels for only about 25 of some 260 south-central Indiana residents who are seeking its financial discount.” The group “blames the backlog on strong solar panel demand ahead of an impending state deadline.”

Seven City Buildings Add Solar Panels In Salt Lake City.

The Deseret (UT) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, McKellar) reports seven buildings in Salt Lake City “have newly-installed solar panels thanks to a $500,000 city investment, Mayor Jackie Biskupski announced Thursday.” The new panels “double the total number of Salt Lake City’s municipal facilities with solar energy to 14 and are part of the city’s goal to reach 100 percent renewable energy for community electricity supply by 2032.” In a statement Biskupski said, “Salt Lake City is committed to powering our government operations, and ultimately the whole community, with 100 percent renewable energy. … This latest round of projects puts solar panels in seven distinct parts of the city, increasing access and visibility to the transition to clean energy that is underway.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

STEM Students In Missouri School Designed And Built 3-D Printer.

The Clinton County (MO) Leader Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Bonebrake) reports students in the STEM program at East Buchanan High School “designed and built a 3-D printer for the elementary students” and also “developed a manual that will allow elementary teachers and students the ability to utilize this new addition to the elementary school.” Program director Mrs. Valeri Jones said, “This is a student-based and project-based curriculum and allows the students to develop future job and life skills in many areas.” One student said the program “has helped me develop public speaking skills, research skills and communication skills.”

Farm Bureau Member Promotes Vocational Agricultural Education As STEM Field.

Mary Smallsreed, a member of Trumbull County Farm Bureau, writes in the Warren (OH) Tribune Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(9/14, Smallsreed) about vocational agriculture education as part of a STEM curriculum, saying that it is supported with federal funds and includes “classroom and laboratory instruction, supervised occupational experiences, and membership in Future Farmers of America.” She adds that there are many careers in agriculture and it is necessary to “get the teachers excited” about the program in order to “engage their students.”

Thursday’s Lead Stories

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier launches ScienceDirect Topics to help researchers quickly build their knowledge and save valuable time searching
Elsevier, the information analytics business specialising in science and health, has announced the launch of ScienceDirect Topics – a free layer of content which provides a quick snapshot of definitions, terms and excerpts on scientific topics, built on Elsevier’s highly trusted book content. Research is becoming increasingly multi-disciplinary, requiring researchers and scientists to quickly come up to speed on topics outside their core scientific discipline.
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 Nature Research launches free online peer review training during Peer Review Week
Nature Research has launched a wide-ranging free peer review training course, delivered by its journal editors to meet the needs of researchers who are new to peer review or those looking to improve their skills. The ‘Focus on Peer Review’ online course, developed by Nature Masterclasses, uses video interviews with Nature Research journal editors, experienced peer reviewers, and published authors to share key insights into the complexities of peer review.
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 Wiley partners with the Orthopaedic Research Society to launch new OA journal – JOR Spine
Publisher John Wiley and Sons, Inc. and the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) have announced the launch of a new international, open access peer-reviewed publication, JOR SpineJOR Spine will be joining theJournal of Orthopaedic Research in the ORS’ publications portfolio and will publish high-quality research on all aspects of orthopaedic research related to the spine. The first issue will publish in January 2018.
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 SAGE and the Market Research Society announce publishing partnership
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has announced that as of January 2018 it is to begin publishing theInternational Journal of Market Research (IJMR) on behalf of the Market Research Society (MRS). The IJMR provides a forum for debate and discussion on all aspects of research and insight including: applications, methodologies, new technologies, as well as strategic and management issues.
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 Taylor & Francis Group now affiliated with the Federation of European Materials Societies
Academic publisher Taylor & Francis Group is now affiliated with the Federation of European Materials Societies (FEMS). FEMS is a not-for-profit association of 27 European Materials societies and associations covering science and engineering in various fields including metals, polymers, ceramics, composites, glasses, nano and biomaterials.
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 Society of American Foresters and Oxford University Press announce publishing partnership
Academic publisher Oxford University Press and the Society of American Foresters (SAF) have announced a new partnership to publish the Journal of Forestry and Forest Science, SAF’s prestigious scientific journals. SAF’s CEO Matt Menashes highlighted the benefits the partnership will bring to readers. According to Menashes, the new partnership will bring even more value to SAF members and subscribers of these science journals.
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 Bioscientifica partners with Sheridan PubFactory to host its journals and medical database content
Sheridan PubFactory and Bioscientifica Limited have announced a new partnership which will see all titles published by Bioscientifica hosted on the PubFactory platform launching Summer 2018. The PubFactory platform has been adopted by a diverse and prestigious group of publishers including OUP, Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group, DeGruyter, Brill, and the IMF.
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