Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 ASTM International to be supporting partner for SPE Offshore Europe Conference and Exhibition 2017
ASTM International has announced that it is a supporting partner of the SPE Offshore Europe Conference and Exhibition 2017, scheduled to be held from September 5-8, 2017, at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre, in the UK. The four-day conference and exhibition is expected to bring more than 50,000 global participants.
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 Springer Nature hosts first SciGraph Hack Day ‘Linked Open Data in Action’
Digital Science recently supported Springer Nature’s first ever SciGraph Hack Day ‘Linked Open Data in Action’. Researchers, developers and Springer Nature staff came together to meet, collaborate and build tools using Springer Nature SciGraph Linked Open Data. At the end of the day, a series of presentations and demos summarising the achievements of those involved in the SciGraph Hack Day were given.
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 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. appoints Dr. Sergi Ferré as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Caffeine Research
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers has announced the appointment of Dr. Sergi Ferré as Editor-in-Chief ofJournal of Caffeine Research which will be retitled to Journal of Caffeine and Adenosine Research starting January 1, 2018. Dr. Sergi Ferré serves as a senior investigator and chief of the Integrative Neurobiology Section at the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
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 Frontiers in Physiology launches new section – Embryonic and Developmental Physiology
Frontiers in Physiology has announced the launch of a new section, Embryonic and Developmental Physiology. Associate Professor Tim Moss of Monash University, Australia and The Ritchie Centre at Hudson Institute of Medical Research is leading the section as Specialty Chief Editor. The new section will provide a focused platform committed to embryologists and developmental physiologists, allowing for easy and free access to research.
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 Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Karin Wulf (Pace Intellectual: Could Publishing Embrace Slow?); Andrew Preston (The Future of Peer Review); Francis Dodds (Increasingly collaborative researcher behaviour is the real threat to the resilient academic publishing sector); Colin Elman and Diana Kapiszewski (Benefits and Challenges of Making Qualitative Research More Transparent); and Mike Iarrobino (Why Text Mining for Pharmacovigilance?). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Google Begins Selling Glass Enterprise Edition With Some Early Adopters Already Using The Technology.

TechRadar Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/12) reports that following a 2015 halt in production, Google announced last month that it will sell Glass Enterprise Edition to business around the world and has now begun doing so. However, the article explains that “companies are already using an enterprise/business version of Google Glass, out of the public eye, and have been working with Google on developing for Glass since it first appeared.” TechRadar calls Glass a “somewhat empty circuit board sandwich” and says that the Skylight platform from the company Upskill “fills” it. A number of industries have adopted Glass and Skylight and GE’s aviation mechanics and engineers are highlighted as one example. Using Glass to display components directly in front of personnel working on jet engines lends an idea of how the platform is useful to another cited example of Glass users: surgeons. Glass is explained by those who use it to be useful for even the simplest reasons, such as showing surgeons a procedure from the user’s own perspective rather than mirrored. However, TechRadar says “there’s a definite sense this is just the beginning” from these “‘hidden’ Glass users” as some are quoted explaining what they hope to see from the technology in the future.

Higher Education

Arizona State University Unveils New Engineering Student Dormitory.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11) reported Arizona State University recently “unveiled a new high-tech, seven-story dormitory on its Tempe campus for engineering students.” The Fulton Schools Residential Community at Tooker House will accommodate 1,600 engineering undergraduates, and feature “two ‘makerspace’ classrooms equipped with 3D printers and laser cutters, and the Bluetooth-equipped laundry room that notifies students when cycles are done.”

University Of West Virginia Researchers Receive NSF Grant To Benefit Engineering, Computer Science Students.

The Morgantown (WV) Dominion Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/13) reports the National Science Foundation awarded a $2 million, five-year grant to West Virginia University researchers “to improve classroom experiences for engineering and computer science students.” WVU will allocate $750,000 to implement a new program that aims to “continue an initiative that fosters inclusion among engineers and computer scientists.” Students enrolled in four classes this fall “will benefit from this grant,” after which “unique activities will expand to all first-year engineering courses in 2018, and sophomore and junior classes in later years of the grant.”

New Mexico State University Surveying Engineering Program Receives NCEES Award.

The Las Cruces (NM) Sun-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/13) reports the New Mexico State University Surveying Engineering program was awarded the annual $10,000 National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying Education Award, “which recognizes surveying programs that best reflect the organization’s mission to advance licensure for surveyors in order to safeguard the health, safety and welfare of the public.” NMSU’s “newly revamped engineering program” will apply the funds toward “scholarships and state-of-the art instrumentation” in its new geomatics course, to be introduced this fall. The school’s engineering technology department head, Tom Jenkins, said that the geomatics program was designed “with substantial direction and support from industry, state and national professional societies.” Pettigrew & Associates president and chief executive Debra P. Hicks, an NMSU engineering alumna and regent, commented, “We are excited NMSU has transformed the program to meet current and future demands of our industry as well as the traditional and non-traditional student.”

Professor Credits New Grant For Potential Partnership Opportunities.

The Greater Binghamton (NY) Press & Sun-Bulletin Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Platsky) reported that Binghamton University has received a National Science Foundation grant worth $4.2 million for “community college students transferring in STEM fields.” University Distinguished Professor M. Stanley Whittingham said that the collaboration the contract will facilitate with local companies, including BAE Systems, will help “undergraduate students [to] get involved in world-leading energy research.”

Tuskegee University Materials Science Engineering Program Receives $2 Million NSF Grant.

WFXG-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Augusta, GA (8/13) reports online that the National Science Foundation awarded Tuskegee University with a five-year, $2 million grant to “provide material science engineering courses to undergraduate students that are majoring in a different field.” Tuskegee hopes to use the funds to “prepare undergraduate students for careers in materials science engineering” and the school’s material engineering masters program. Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies Shaik Jeelani said to accomplish that goal, “we came up with this concept of a minor in material science engineering. If they can take that minor while they’re undergraduates they will not only get a certificate in minor and make themselves marketable, and their stay in the graduate program is shortened because of the minor. They don’t have to take a lot of prerequisites.” School officials hope to enroll 10 students in the program this spring.

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

Northwestern University Researchers Creating 3D Printed Ovaries.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/12, Blakemore) reports that Northwestern University researcher Teresa Woodruff is creating 3D printed ovaries that are “helping scientists better understand the female reproductive system — and that understanding has opened the door to promising new fertility treatments.” The Post reports that Woodruff has recently featured in the podcast “People Behind the Science,” which “asks scientists about their motivations, challenges and accomplishments.” Woodruff is “also trying to discover the ways that biological sex affects how medicines perform in the body, and she works to make sure more women are represented in the sciences.”

Notre Dame Researchers Using Particle Accelerator In Abandoned Mine To Study Heavy Element Formation.

An article in Wired Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Scoles) explains how the mining company that owned the Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota in 2006 donated the site to the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority, saying “researchers repurposed its protective layers of rock to search for things like dark matter and neutrinos.” The piece reports that University of Notre Dame scientists “went west, the disassembled pieces of a particle accelerator secured in the back of their U-haul. Over 1,000 miles later and nearly a mile down, they started installing the machine” in the mine. Notre Dame researchers will use the repurposed Compact Accelerator System for Performing Astrophysical Research to “mimic the fusion that goes on inside stars to learn how they make heavy elements—like the ones that people dug out of the Homestake mine, and that make up solar systems.”

Air Force Completes Testing Of Highly Efficient Diesel Engine.

UPI Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Carlson) reports that the Air Force Research Laboratory has completed a ground test series on a new high-efficiency diesel aircraft engine which uses “up to 40 percent less fuel than similar engines while increasing range and flight time by up to 50 percent.” The article explains that the USAF is considering the engine, which can use diesel, Jet-A, or JP-8 fuels, for aircraft and UAV applications. UPI quotes Capt. Randall Hodkin, Aviation Working Group lead officer, who stated, “If we can reduce or eliminate the need to ship specialized fuels, we’ve then reduced the associated cost and risk.”

Houston Lags In Clean Energy Research.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/12, Handy, DePillis) reports that Houston may lose its title as “energy capital of the world” as “the world shifts from fossil fuels to clean energy technologies.” That’s because there are “very few” companies working on clean energy in Houston compared to “Boston and Silicon Valley but also cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles” and even “Austin and Lubbock, where most of Texas’ clean tech startups are based.” The Chronicle adds that Chevron is supporting such research “in Boston and Silicon Valley, but not in Houston,” and “most of its clean energy research is done in California.” BP Ventures, likewise supports research in California and the United Kingdom, and its only research related firm in Houston “makes acoustic technology for drilling oil wells.” Shell’s research on clean energy “is mostly centered in San Francisco, London and Amsterdam.”

NASA Shows Off Deep-Space Simulation Habitat In New Video.

SPACE Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/13, Malik) reports a NASA video for a Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) habitat that simulates deep space missions. The team is currently in the midst of an ongoing series of exercises through September 18. In the video, NASA interns tour HERA and highlight its capabilities.

Workforce

Google CEO Faces Calls To Resign Over Gender Diversity Memo.

NBC Nightly News (8/11, story 5, 2:10, Holt) reported Google CEO Sundar Pichai’s recent firing of an employee who wrote an internal memo “that questioned the abilities of women” has led to calls for his resignation. Business correspondent Jo Ling Kent said that the pressure is mounting for Pichai to step down “after canceling a company-wide meeting to address gender description late yesterday.” Employee James Damore wrote in his memo that “women are underrepresented in tech due to, quote, ‘biological differences’ and efforts to achieve more diversity are ‘bad for business.’” According to Kent, Damore has since “filed a Federal complaint and told NBC News he plans to take legal action against Google.”

Former Google Manager Says Company Had No Choice But Fire Engineer Behind Diversity Memo. The CBS Weekend News (8/12, story 5, 1:35, Ninan) reported Google found itself in “the middle of a national debate” this week after a software engineer was fired over criticizing the company’s diversity policies in a memo. Correspondent Carter Evans said, “28-year-old software engineer James Damore claims he was fired for ‘raising questions about cultural taboos’ when he argued in an internal company memo that ‘biological causes may explain why we don’t see equal representation’ in the tech industry.” Former Google manager Kim Scott said, “I don’t think Google had any choice but to fire James.”

Miller: Damore Essay Ignores Value Of Emotional Language In Computer Engineering. Claire Cain Miller writes a piece in the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/12, Miller, Subscription Publication) “The Upshot” blog that refutes the thesis of Damore’s essay, saying that notwithstanding refutations of the “biology” in the essay, “the job requirements of today’s programmers show he was also wrong about working in tech.” Miller writes that “interpersonal skills like collaboration, communication, empathy and emotional intelligence are essential to the job. The myth that programming is done by loner men who think only rationally and communicate only with their computers harms the tech industry in ways that cut straight to the bottom line.”

Industry News

AGCO Introducing Google Glass To Factories Worldwide.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, DePass) reported that Google Glass “has been reborn as an emerging ‘lean’ industrial tool inside AGCO’s custom-tractor factory in Jackson, Minn.,” and “will soon be rolled out to AGCO factories worldwide.” IHS Markit’s principal analyst of smart manufacturing division Alex West said, “Lockheed Martin introduced augmented reality solutions from Epson while manufacturing their F-35 fighter planes.” West added that Lockheed Martin provided the glasses to its engineers to help show where to fit parts.

Engineering and Public Policy

New Orleans Repairs Broken Turbine Powering Drainage System.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, McWhirter, Subscription Publication) reports that in advance of an impending storm this weekend, the city of New Orleans repaired a broken power turbine, which powers the city’s drainage system. Rain last week caused up to nine inches of flooding and lead to the turbine’s failure. Mayor Mitch Landrieu said that the city is ordering an additional 26 generators “out of an abundance of caution,” but also urged calm. He said, “Panic is not where we need to be right now.” However, Landrieu emphasized the city must do better at operating pumping stations.

NYTimes: Commuter Tax Could Help Fund New York City Transit Projects.

An editorial by the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Subscription Publication) says New York politicians should “consider reviving an old revenue source” for transit projects “that state lawmakers eliminated 18 years ago, to New York City’s enduring harm. … the commuter tax,” which the Times describes as “a modest imposition on…suburbanites who make their living in the city and may reasonably be expected to contribute a little to help keep it running.” At a time when taxing the rich is being discussed as one way to fund transit projects and other necessary public safety services, the Times says the state could instead raise close to $1 billion annually with a commuter tax at “0.45 percent of a person’s earnings.” Although the Times has little hope a commuter tax measure would pass in Albany, “especially” ahead of next year’s state elections, the editorial says reviving the tax “would correct a historical mistake.”

Engineer Argues For Detroit To Get Transportation Revitalization “Right.”

Regine Beauboeuf, the head of the architectural engineering firm Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber in Grand Rapids, Michigan, writes in Crain’s Detroit Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/13) that if the city of Detroit fails to get efforts right to revitalize its transportation infrastructure, “we will fall behind faster as rapid innovation continues to accelerate the pace of change.” Noting the city has a “hodgepodge of transportation modes,” Beauboeuf says there is “no overall mobility plan that serves the entire region.” She argues the “city has a unique opportunity to design a cohesive and tiered modal mix for the convenient and fluid movement of people, goods and vehicles, nonmotorized or motorized,” highlighting the M-1 Rail as an example of public-private collaboration spearheaded by the city.

DOE Accepting Applications For New Round Of Hydropower Plant Development Funding.

PennEnergy Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Harris) reported the Department of Energy is currently accepting applications for $6.6 million in funding “for new hydroelectric power development at existing dams and conduits.” The article explained that the funding, which was “made under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005,” aims to utilize “the U.S.’ vast hydropower potential.” DOE’s Water Power Technologies Office said in a release, “Using existing dam infrastructure can lower construction costs and reduce permitting time, meaning hydropower is added to the grid faster.”

DOE Grid Emergency Plan Still Incomplete As Tensions With Korea Intensify.

E&E Publishing’s Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Cusick, Subscription Publication) Peter Behr argued the potential for “a destructive North Korean attack on U.S. power grids with cyber or nuclear weapons” would require Energy Secretary Rick Perry and his department to step into “a critical role overseeing the restoration of electricity to potentially tens of millions of people, with countless lives at stake.” However, “the playbook that Perry and the Department of Energy would follow in a presidentially declared grid emergency is incomplete,” which means industry security officials would be “uncertain of how Perry and DOE would respond.” Behr explained that the Obama Administration “proposed a FAST Act emergency plan on Dec. 7, 2016, missing the year-end deadline Congress had set for a final policy,” and highlighted officials who think the current Administration should move forward with a reassessment of the emergency plan.

Texas Considers Concerns About Grid Reliability.

In a round up of weekly energy news, Texas Monthly Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Solomon) considered concerns raised by the Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Handy) about the security of electrical grid reliability. According to the Chronicle, Texas “needs coal, natural gas and nuclear plants to meet electricity demand, but the problem for power companies is they only make money when their plants are running, not while waiting for the wind to stop blowing and the sun to stop shining.” Summer price spikes used to cover the costs, but “spikes happen less often” these days. Texas Monthly reported the Texas Public Utility Commission hosted a workshop last week “to consider if the state’s unregulated electricity market – the only such system in the U.S. – needs to be updated to better reflect a grid with multiple energy sources, some of which are cheap enough that power companies worry.”

According to E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Klump, Subscription Publication), the workshop offered the PUC “a chance to crystallize the dilemma” in the midst of “a period of uncertainty at the three-seat PUC, which has one open spot.” E&E offered a brief explanation of some proposed solutions for improving “the state’s main wholesale power market.”

New York To Consider Carbon Charge To Fossil Fuel-Generated Power.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Polson, Malik) reported New York lawmakers are “weighing more steps to cut carbon emissions by changing the way that electricity is traded,” including potentially “adding a carbon charge to the price of power generated by fossil-fuel plants” – a move Bloomberg said “could advance the state’s goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent from 1990 levels, at little or no extra cost to customers, according to a study carried out by the Brattle Group.” Brattle, which was hired by the state’s grid operator to “study ways in which the state could advance its fight against global warming while preserving competitive power markets,” found that “a carbon charge would be a straightforward and economically efficient way to harmonize New York’s environmental goals and the wholesale market design,” according to the report. Bloomberg reported a $40 a ton carbon charge would have “a ‘relatively small’ impact on customer costs…amounting to a minus 1% to plus 2% change in total electric bills.” The grid operator has scheduled a conference to discuss the idea on September 6.

WV Gov. Calls For $4.5 Billion Plan To Subsidize Coal.

The Huntington (WV) Herald-Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/12, Pace) reported West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice’s recent party switch “appears to have a specific reason – coal, and he needs the president’s help.” Justice claims to have “developed a plan to put tens of thousands of coal miners back to work in West Virginia and across Appalachia, while providing a critical addition to national security and the stabilization of the Eastern Seaboard’s power grid.” According to the article, Justice presented a plan to President Trump “that calls for $4.5 billion annually in federal funding to power companies that burn steam coal mined in Northern and Central Appalachia,” along with “federal funding to pay Eastern power plants $15 for each ton of thermal coal they buy from the Central or Northern Appalachian region.” Justice reportedly “claims this incentive would guarantee that Eastern coal would be available” to maintain the power grid “in the event of any type of emergency shutdown that would affect power plants utilizing natural gas or coal produced in other areas of the country.”

 

Elementary/Secondary Education

Amazon Donates STEM Equipment To Shakopee Junior High Schools.

Shakopee Valley (MN) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/11, Stanwood) reported Amazon employees surprised students at Shakopee West Junior High School and Shakopee East Junior High School on Thursday, donating $10,000 worth of STEM equipment which “will help the kids produce more with their limited time in the classrooms.” Technology and Engineering teacher TJ Hendrickson said, “If they’re doing the same kind of coding and input process, then we’re training kids to literally be able to step into Amazon, walk in off of the street and say, ‘I can do this.’” He estimated that as many 3,500 students will have the opportunity to use Amazon’s donations during the school year.

Friday’s Lead Stories

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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 105 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 105 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 105 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Impact of canopy representations on regional modeling of evapotranspiration using the WRF-ACASA coupled model Xu, L., Pyles, R.D., Paw U, K.T., Snyder, R., Monier, E., Falk, M., Chen, S.-H. 2017 Agricultural and Forest Meteorology ,
247 pp. 79 – 92 .
2 . Potential evidence of communal nesting, mate guarding, or biparental care in the salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris halicoetes) Trombley, S., Smith, K.R. 2017 California Fish and Game ,
103 ( 1 ) pp. 15 – 20 .
3 . Hierarchical, Quantitative Biogeographic Provinces for All North American Turtles and Their Contribution to the Biogeography of Turtles and the Continent Ennen, J.R., Matamoros, W.A., Agha, M., Lovich, J.E., Sweat, S.C., Hoagstrom, C.W. 2017 Herpetological Monographs ,
31 ( 1 ) pp. 114 – 140 .
4 . Synthesis and Multi Scale Tribological Behavior of WC-Co/Nanodiamond Nanocomposites Nieto, A., Jiang, L., Kim, J., Kim, D.-E., Schoenung, J.M. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 7060
5 . Dietary perturbations alter the ecological significance of ingested Lactobacillus plantarum in the digestive tract Yin, X., Lee, B., Zaragoza, J., Marco, M.L. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 7267
6 . Metal-Insulator Transition in Nanoparticle Solids: Insights from Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations Qu, L., Vörös, M., Zimanyi, G.T. 2017 Scientific Reports ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 7071
7 . Cardiac adaptations in SCNT newborn cloned calves during the first month of life assessed by echocardiography Batchelder, C.A., Whitcomb, M.B., Famula, T.R., Rodriguez-Villamil, P., Bertolini, M., Hoffert-Goeres, K.A., Anderson, G.B. 2017 Theriogenology ,
103 pp. 153 – 161 .
8 . Crystalline cohomology of superschemes Luu, M.T. 2017 Journal of Geometry and Physics ,
121 pp. 83 – 92 .
9 . Spatial representation of magnitude in gorillas and orangutans Gazes, R.P., Diamond, R.F.L., Hope, J.M., Caillaud, D., Stoinski, T.S., Hampton, R.R. 2017 Cognition ,
168 pp. 312 – 319 .
10 . With great power comes great responsibility: Superhero primes and expansive poses influence prosocial behavior after a motion-controlled game task Peña, J., Chen, M. 2017 Computers in Human Behavior ,
76 pp. 378 – 385 .
11 . Nondestructive determination of dry matter and soluble solids content in dehydrator onions and garlic using a handheld visible and near infrared instrument Jantra, C., Slaughter, D.C., Liang, P.-S., Pathaveerat, S. 2017 Postharvest Biology and Technology ,
133 pp. 98 – 103 .
12 . Subdivision connectivity remeshing via teichmüller extremal map Choi, C.P., Gu, X., Lui, L.M. 2017 Inverse Problems and Imaging ,
11 ( 5 ) pp. 825 – 855 .
13 . Dysbiotic Proteobacteria expansion: a microbial signature of epithelial dysfunction Litvak, Y., Byndloss, M.X., Tsolis, R.M., Bäumler, A.J. 2017 Current Opinion in Microbiology ,
39 pp. 1 – 6 .
14 . Effects of roads and roadside fencing on movements, space use, and carapace temperatures of a threatened tortoise Mark Peaden, J., Justin Nowakowski, A., Tuberville, T.D., Buhlmann, K.A., Todd, B.D. 2017 Biological Conservation ,
214 pp. 13 – 22 .
15 . A model exploring whether the coupled effects of plant water supply and demand affect the interpretation of water potentials and irrigation management Spinelli, G.M., Shackel, K.A., Gilbert, M.E. 2017 Agricultural Water Management ,
192 pp. 271 – 280 .
16 . Extracranial internal carotid artery calcium volume measurement using computer tomography Baradaran, H., Ng, C.R., Gupta, A., Noor, N.M., Al-Dasuqi, K.W., Mtui, E.E., Rijal, O.M., Giannopoulos, A., Nicolaides, A., Laird, J.R., Saba, L., Suri, J.S. 2017 International Angiology ,
36 ( 5 ) pp. 445 – 461 .
17 . Large-area release and transfer of ultrathin, freestanding nanocrystalline ceria films Kienle, D.F., Ventrici de Souza, J., Kuhl, T.L. 2017 Thin Solid Films ,
638 pp. 318 – 323 .
18 . Synthesis and surface enthalpy of MgGa<inf>2</inf>O<inf>4</inf> spinel Sharma, G., Castro, R.H.R. 2017 Thermochimica Acta ,
655 pp. 326 – 330 .
19 . Influence of exchangeable oxygen on biogenic silica oxygen isotope data Menicucci, A.J., Spero, H.J., Matthews, J., Parikh, S.J. 2017 Chemical Geology ,
466 pp. 710 – 721 .
20 . “That’s My Face to the Whole Field!”: Graduate Students’ Professional Identity-Building through Twitter at a Writing Studies Conference Coad, D.T. 2017 Computers and Composition ,
45 pp. 51 – 66 .
21 . The biology of color Cuthill, I.C., Allen, W.L., Arbuckle, K., Caspers, B., Chaplin, G., Hauber, M.E., Hill, G.E., Jablonski, N.G., Jiggins, C.D., Kelber, A., Mappes, J., Marshall, J., Merrill, R., Osorio, D., Prum, R., Roberts, N.W., Roulin, A., Rowland, H.M., Sherratt, T.N., Skelhorn, J., Speed, M.P., Stevens, M., Stoddard, M.C., Stuart-Fox, D., Talas, L., Tibbetts, E., Caro, T. 2017 Science ,
357 ( 6350 ) , art. no. eaan0221
22 . Transcriptional activity of PIF and Pong-like Class II transposable elements in Triticeae Markova, D.N., Mason-Gamer, R.J. 2017 BMC Evolutionary Biology ,
17 ( 1 ) , art. no. 178
23 . Translating epigenetics into clinic: Focus on lupus Wang, Z., Chang, C., Peng, M., Lu, Q. 2017 Clinical Epigenetics ,
9 ( 1 ) , art. no. 78
24 . A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ganaxolone in children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome Ligsay, A., Van Dijck, A., Nguyen, D.V., Lozano, R., Chen, Y., Bickel, E.S., Hessl, D., Schneider, A., Angkustsiri, K., Tassone, F., Ceulemans, B., Kooy, R.F., Hagerman, R.J. 2017 Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders ,
9 ( 1 ) , art. no. 26
25 . Hierarchical differences in population coding within auditory cortex Downer, J.D., Niwa, M., Sutter, M.L. 2017 Journal of Neurophysiology ,
118 ( 2 ) pp. 717 – 731
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Elsevier announces publication of nine new pharmaceutical science books
Elsevier, the information analytics business specialising in science and health, has announced the publication of From Artemisia annua L. to Artemisinins: The Discovery and Development of Artemisinins and Antimalarial Agents by Chinese Nobel laureate Youyou Tu. It is the first book that systematically introduces the origin and development of artemisinine and artemisinine-based drugs. One of the nine new pharmaceutical science books, From Artemisia annua L. to Artemisinins will be a valuable reference work for both researchers involved in the medical industry and scholars who are interested in undertaking innovative research.
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 Northern Alberta Institute of Technology opts for Ex Libris Alma® library services platform
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) has selected the Ex Libris Alma® library services platform to replace the institute’s Voyager® integrated library system. NAIT is already using the Ex Libris Primo discovery and delivery solution, which will be tightly integrated with Alma to optimise the student and staff experience.
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 Copyright Clearance Center announces enhancements to RightFind
Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC) has announced enhancements to RightFind, a content workflow solution that provides secure, cloud-based access to scientific, technical and medical (STM) information and other categories of high-value content. With this update, granular Open Access coverage soon will expand to content from Taylor and Francis, Karger, American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics and other publishers.
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 Emerald among first to join NISO Open Discovery Initiative
Academic publisher Emerald Publishing has become one of the first academic publishers to release a set of checklists detailing what it is doing to make the content it publishes easier to find. The NISO Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) checklist helps publishers convey, in a standard format, exactly what they are doing to increase the discoverability of their content.
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 ACCUCOMS to represent The Alliance of Crop, Soil & Environmental Science Societies in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka
The Alliance of Crop, Soil & Environmental Science Societies (ACSESS) will start working with ACCUCOMS to bring their content to the growing academic market in the Indian sub-continent. ACSESS is the umbrella organisation for three non-profit societies: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
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 Cenveo Publisher Services announces Author Services 2.0
Cenveo Publisher Services, a division of Cenveo, Inc., has announced a major update to Author Services, a publisher-branded e-commerce tool. Author Services enables the collection of fees integrated directly into a publisher’s composition workflow. The latest iteration of this tool vastly improves transactions and accommodates grant IDs, funding sources, ORCID IDs, and more directly in the XML.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Minor Cultural Changes Can Increase Number Of Woman Computer Science Majors.

NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter’s (8/10, Sydell) “All Tech Considered” reports top computer science schools have shown that “a few cultural changes can increase the number of women in the field,” despite what a controversial memo from a Google engineer may have argued this week. When she arrived as president of Harvey Mudd College, Maria Klawe, a computer scientist herself, “joined in an effort to change the curriculum,” including changing the name of the intro course and adding a second intro course for students who had no previous experience programming. She said this second class took away the “intimidation” that comes with taking “a class where you’ve had no prior experience and somebody else has been programming since they were eight.” Since these changes were made, the number of women in computer science majors at Harvey Mudd jumped from 10 percent in any given year to between 40 to 50 percent.

Higher Education

NSF Gives West Virginia University $2 Million To Support Diversity In STEM Programs.

The Clarksburg (WV) Exponent-Telegram Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) reports that the National Science Foundation has given researchers at West Virginia University a $2 million grant “to improve classroom experiences for engineering and computer science students.” The effort “aims to continue an initiative that fosters inclusion among engineers and computer scientists” and is “a collaboration including scholars from the College of Education and Human Services, the Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, the College of Creative Arts and the WVU ADVANCE Center.”

Boeing Partners With WUSTL To Increase Diversity In STEM Fields.

Diverse Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that National Science Foundation COO Dr. Joan Ferrini-Mundy is praising “a longstanding partnership between The Boeing Company and Washington University in St. Louis…as a potential model for how to diversify STEM fields in general and America’s aerospace industry in particular.” The piece quotes Ferrini-Mundy saying, “We’re really watching this one with great interest because I think it’s a model that we could use later.”

Purdue Closer To Deal To Take Over Kaplan University.

The Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) reports that state regulators have given Purdue University approval to acquire Kaplan University. However, Century Foundation senior fellow Robert M. Shireman is calling on ED to reject the school’s change of control request “because, he argues, control isn’t really changing. He also argues that by approving Kaplan’s application, the department would be agreeing with Purdue’s implicit request to treat the new venture as if it were a public university, even though Purdue actually plans to create a private entity to run it and proposes other actions that raise questions as to how public it really will be.”

The South Bend (IN) Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) reports the Indiana Commission for Higher Education “voted unanimously to grant necessary approvals that will allow Purdue University to launch and oversee NewU, its new affiliated institution.” In April, Purdue announced the bid to purchase Kaplan “and create a new public university designed to expand access to higher education. Kaplan is primarily a distance learning institution that also has 15 physical locations across the country, including an Indianapolis campus.” This piece notes that ED and the Higher Learning Commission accreditation agency must still approve the plan.

The Lafayette (IN) Journal and Courier Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) reports that ED “is expected to vote on the proposed university in early September, while the Higher Learning Commission may take up the matter at either its November or February meeting.” Said Purdue President Mitch Daniels, “This is a crucial step toward enabling us to meet our obligation – particularly to Hoosier families – of increasing access to education and improving lives.”

Program Allows College Students To Intern As Chicago Public Schools Tech Support.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Jackson) reports on a program that allows Chicago Public Schools graduates who are currently in college to work in “paid internships as tech support at schools across the district.” The Tribune reports that the program is popular with administrators, and “gives students extra training and job experience as junior technology coordinators, while providing the schools with on-site support for their IT needs.”

Paper Criticizes CSU Move To Remove Remedial Classes.

An editorial in the Orange County (CA) Register Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) takes issue with the California State University system for eliminating mandatory math and English placement exams and remedial courses, a move “intended to improve graduation rates and college affordability, since remedial courses do not count toward graduation requirements.” The paper questions whether it is a significant “imposition to require up to three remediation classes during a student’s first year, particularly if their skills are subpar.” The paper suggests that improving college readiness is a better approach.

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

AI Robots Searching For Drugs That Could Treat ALS.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Hirschler) reports Dr. Richard Mead of the Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience and his team are using AI-powered robots to search for drugs that could treat ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The robots “analyze huge chemical, biological and medical databases, alongside reams of scientific papers, far quicker than humanly possible, throwing up new biological targets and potential drugs.” Reuters notes that Mead and “his team in northern England are not the only ones waking up to the ability of AI to elucidate the complexities of ALS,” citing reports of Arizona-based Barrow Neurological Institute using IBM Watson to discover five new genes linked to ALS last December.

Toyota Patents Automatic Neutral Engagement System For Manual Transmission Vehicles.

Road and Track Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Sorokanich) reports on a new Toyota “patent vaguely titled ‘Controller For Vehicle And Control Method For Vehicle,’” revealed by Roadshow reporter Andrew Krok, for a device that “would allow traditional manual-transmission vehicles to automatically slip into neutral to coast down hills, without driver input” and also prevent drivers from switching to too low of a gear while going down a hill. The story says this “automatic neutral engagement could go a long way toward keeping manual transmissions around in future vehicles” while complying with stricter emissions rules, as “engineers could incorporate the auto-stop-start systems currently found in many automatic vehicles,” as well as “autonomous braking systems” that shift the car into neutral during “a panic stop, thereby not stalling out.” The story further compares Toyota’s system with its technological predecessors used in “old 1960s Saabs” and “other cars as far back as the 1930s.”

Bioactive Tissue Paper May Eventually Be Used For Transplants.

MedIndia Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Paknikar) reports a bioactive tissue paper has been produced, by accident, that can by printed with 3D printers and produce “synthetic tissues and even entire organs that can be used for transplantation.” The paper is made “from organs like ovary, uterus, heart, liver and muscle obtained from pigs or cows.” The article says, “Though the tissue appears to have favorable properties, it will be still some time before it can be used in humans. The scientists feel that it has the potential to be used in various fields like tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, drug discovery and therapeutics.”

Researchers Develop Non-Invasive, Ultrasound-Triggered Pain Relief System.

Mass Device Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Faulkner) reports that researchers “have developed a technology to non-invasively trigger the release of nerve-blocking agents, helping to provide targeted pain-relief to patients as an alternative to addictive opioids.” They “created liposomes that are laden with sono-sensitizers – agents that sensitive to ultrasound – and filled the artificial sacs with a nerve-blocking drug.” The liposomes are injected and ultrasound is applied to open them and release the nerve-blocking drug into the local tissue to reduce pain. The findings Share to FacebookShare to Twitter were published in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

Workforce

Some Manufacturing Leaders See “Technological” Solution To Skills Gap

Engineering Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Wright) reports that “there have been plenty of proposals for strengthening U.S. manufacturing – some point to the importance of improving American manufacturing technology, while others argue that those technological gains won’t matter without a skilled workforce.” The article discusses “another way to address the looming skills gap in manufacturing and elsewhere,” and suggest that “the imminent fourth industrial revolution and its smart factories of the future suggest that the solution may be a technological one.” The article discusses new “instruction software” that can “guide personnel through complex tasks and simultaneously monitor their performance” as an example of new technology that will impact manufacturing.

Google CEO Holds All-Hands Meeting To Discuss Memo Controversy.

The New York Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Perez) reports that Google CEO Sundar Pichai planned “an all-hands meeting” on Thursday to discuss the firing of James Damore, the engineer who sent out a memo blaming “biological causes” for the lack of achievements by women in the tech world. The article describes the meeting as “Pichai’s first major chance to try and unite a diverse workforce that’s become divided over Damore’s termination earlier this week.”

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Petrecca) reports that the memo at Google “inflamed an already-contentious debate on the topic.” The article adds that the Google incident is “just one in a string high-profile gender bias and harassment incidents at major companies of late, and comes as some firms ramp up their inclusion initiatives and work to eradicate an exclusionary, male-centric atmosphere.”

Industry News

Automakers Concerned Autonomous Cars May Erode Driving Skills.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Naughton) reports that automakers are increasingly concerned that technologies designed to assist drivers to avoid accidents and improve safety “are having an unintended consequence: They’re degrading driving skills.” Insurance Institute for Highway Safety President Adrian Lund said, “There are lots of concerns about people checking out and we are trying to monitor that now. … Everything we do that makes the driving task a little easier means that people are going to pay a little bit less attention when they’re driving.” Bloomberg says the stakes are high in seeking to address “deteriorating driver skills,” given that roadway deaths “jumped 14 percent over the last two years, with more than 40,000 people dying in crashes in 2016.”

Bosch Struggles To Shake Dieselgate Scandal As It Focuses On Future Transportation Technologies.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Lawrence, Mehrotra, Rauwald, Behrmann, Beene) reports Bosch’s engineering “prowess” as the world’s largest auto supplier “has convinced management that the company can transform itself into a broader global technology giant in line with the Googles of the world,” but even as the company shifts more and more resources toward IoT and semiconductors its “past is catching up to it in a cascade of new claims that the supplier was at the heart of the diesel emissions cheating scandal, one of the biggest product fraud cases ever.” The story says Bosch’s “legal woes are far from over.”

Report: Electric Cars Will Have 21% Market Share By 2035.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Osborne) reports that “electric cars will be a regular feature of global roadways within the next two decade, far faster than many government forecasts predict, according to a study by the research firm Wood Mackenzie.” The study found “that by 2035 there will be 350 million electric cars on the road – representing 21 percent of the total vehicles – as world governments seek to reduce carbon emissions to combat climate change.” The Chronicle says “that is a far more bullish outlook than held by the U.S. government, which predicts that by 2040 electric vehicles will only represent 10 percent of total U.S. vehicle sales – sales mind you, not vehicles on the road.”

Engineering and Public Policy

West Virginia Governor: Trump Likes Coal Subsidy Idea.

In continuing coverage, the Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Siciliano) reports that West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice “of West Virginia is pitching the idea of federal coal subsidies to President Trump, in which the federal government pays power plants to buy Appalachian coal.” Justice said Trump is “really interested” in the idea. He said, “He’s really interested. He likes the idea. … Naturally, he’s trying to vet the whole process. It’s a complicated idea.” The Examiner says “a federal subsidy program would require congressional approval, as well as survive the ire of some conservative groups who oppose federal subsidies.”

The New York Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Moore) reports that “Justice, who said he’s also talked about the proposal with Energy Secretary Rick Perry, Vice President Pence and Trump adviser Jared Kushner, warned that the US is too dependent on natural gas to generate power.”

Newsmax Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Fitzgerald) reports that Justice “Thursday defended a $4.5 billion request he’s made to save the coal industry in his state and elsewhere in the eastern part of the United States, saying the measure is needed for national security.” On Fox News, he denied that it’s a bailout. “I mean, just think for just one second,” said Justice. “We came really close to completely losing our eastern coal fields in the past probably four years. Fifty-five companies took bankruptcy. Now at the end of the day, we better awaken to one thing, and that’s for sure: We can’t afford today to do without coal in the east.” He continued, “It’s just a matter of national security. … Think about if you awaken to the fact the eastern coal fields are gone and there is a disruption. There is a bomb at a gas junction or at a bridge or two that is bringing western coal. What are we going to do?”

Microgrids Could Pay Big Dividends Across US.

TIME Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Worland) reports that “microgrids have become increasingly popular across the U.S. in recent years, embraced by everyone from community developers to military officials.” Time says “the reason is as simple as the bottom line: the technology offers a way for communities to collect, store and use their own energy, rather than pay for it to be shipped from miles away.” According to GTM Research, “microgrid capacity is expected to double by 2020, totaling 4.3 gigawatts in microgrid potential.” Time points out that “the promise of both resiliency and frugality has made the U.S. military one of the biggest boosters of microgrids.”

Solar Operators Prepare For Eclipse.

WLS-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Chicago (8/10) reports that “while many are eagerly awaiting the August 21 solar eclipse, solar energy plants are preparing for that brief moment.” According to John Moura, director of reliability assessment and system analysis for the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC),”where the sun disappears on Aug. 21, the supply of electricity from solar generation will go with it” and “when the sun comes back, there will quickly be a lot of supply added.” He said, “After working with NASA and getting the lines all mapped out, even Southern California is going to receive up to a 60 percent obscuration of the sun. … That’s directly correlated with solar – electricity generation – output.” WLS says “what we learn from this eclipse will help us better understand how the grid will have to change to make that new influx of solar electricity work – both on an everyday basis and during extreme events.”

Map Shows Growth Of Wind Farms Across US.

The San Jose (CA) Mercury News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Rogers) reports that a new map released Thursday shows the wind power “industry is spreading rapidly across the United States, with more than 52,000 large-scale turbines now operating in 41 states.” The report says “a time lapse feature on the map, built by the American Wind Energy Association, shows the growth over time, from one lonely wind farm at Altamont Pass in Northern California to hundreds of wind farms that construction crews are building all across the remote fields and ranches of Great Plains – from Texas to North Dakota – and most recently, in the ocean, with America’s first offshore wind farm opening last year off Rhode Island.” The Mercury News says that “through the second quarter of 2017, the U.S. now has 84,405 megawatts of installed wind power capacity, enough to power 25 million households, and twice as much as it had in 2010.”

Solar Backers Speak Against Utah Power Company’s Rate Change Proposal.

In continuing coverage, the AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) reports that “Utah regulators have heard testimony about a proposed electricity rate change for people with home solar panels that power company officials argue they need to maintain the state’s grid but solar advocates claim would cause bills to skyrocket.” The AP says “dozens of people lined up Wednesday to speak with state regulators considering the plan from Rocky Mountain Power.” Meanwhile, “the Utah Public Service Commission is set to continue hearings on the issue next week, though two sides have also been working…to find a compromise.” Rocky Mountain power spokesman Jon Cox “said solar customers are not covering their fair share of power production costs because the company now pays full retail price to buy extra power from homes with solar panels, rather than the wholesale price.” But, according to the AP, “solar advocates argue the company’s plan would unfairly drive prices up for people investing in a clean source of energy.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

California High School Students Working Toward CubeSat Launch.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Chan) reports that over 100 high school students in Irvine, California have spent the past year working on “a mission to engineer and launch a nano-satellite into orbit.” The students have “entered the project’s final phase at Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems, Inc. in Irvine, which involved integrating their satellite, known as the CubeSat, into a dispenser that will attach to a launch vehicle and send the device into space.” If successful, the project will culminate in “the first successful high school-based CubeSat launch on the West Coast.”

Study: Rural Students’ Access To AP STEM Courses Improving.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10) reports that, according to a new study from the College Board and the Education Commission of the States, while rural students’ access to Advanced Placement courses continues to lag that of urban and suburban students, that gap is narrowing. In 2001, only 56% of rural students had access to AP courses, but that number has risen to 73%. Moreover, the “percentage of students with access to an AP course in a STEM subject” rose from 42% to 62% over the same period.

West Virginia Making New Investment In CTE.

In a 1,400-word feature article, The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Goldstein, Subscription Publication) reports that West Virginia is attempting an educational “transformation,” as the traditionally poor state is “turning vocational education from a Plan B for underachieving students into what policy makers hope will be a fuel source for the state’s economic revival.” The Times writes that “simulated workplaces, overseen by teachers newly trained in important state industries like health, coal and even fracking, are now operating in schools across the state.” The article states that “West Virginia’s heavy push on vocational education comes as leaders of both parties have talked about making it a priority.” However, it also notes that the US lags behind other industrialized nations in the vocational training it offers. “Only 6 percent of American high school students were enrolled in a vocational course of study, according to a 2013 Department of Education report,” the Times writes, while “in the United Kingdom, 42 percent were on the vocational track; in Germany, it was 59 percent; in the Netherlands, 67 percent; and in Japan, 25 percent.” The article quotes former Education and Labor Department Official Mary Alice McCarthy saying, “We are so focused on academic routes as opposed to other routes that can be high quality. There’s a desperate need.”

Massachusetts Teachers Learn How To Use 3D Printers, Laser Cutters.

The Wareham (MA) Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Hilsman) reports lab with 3D printers, circuits, and electronic kits was “set up on the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth campus on Aug. 9 for teachers participating in the South Coast STEM Education grant program.” Teachers attending the event “designed nameplates on the computer, which they then brought to life with the laser cutter.” Dr. Stephen Witzig from the university’s Department of STEM Education & Teacher Development, explained, “It was a simple project to introduce them to the technology, and then they can extrapolate how they would use that in their math and science classes.” The program is “funded by a $2.86 million grant from the National Science Foundation/ Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program.” It also “requires a five-year commitment from its participants in return for graduate coursework and professional development, according to the UMass Dartmouth website.”

Thursday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Nature Index points industry to institutions providing ideas behind inventions
The Nature Index 2017 Innovation supplement sheds new light on the impact academic research is having on innovation by examining how research articles are cited in third party patents. By looking at patents owned by third parties – informed by and citing academic work – rather than those held by institutions themselves, the influence of research on the development of products and services is exposed.
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 Elsevier announces exclusive agreement with the Visiting Nurse Associations of America for online clinical skills for home healthcare clinicians
Elsevier has entered an exclusive agreement with the Visiting Nurse Associations of America (VNAA) to develop Hospice Skills and more than 400 home healthcare skills from the VNAA’s award-winning Clinical Procedures Manual. The partnership will deliver VNAA content to the competency management platforms of Elsevier Home Health Care and Elsevier Clinical Skills, helping home healthcare organisations increase safety of care, standardise practice, and ensure competency.
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 Wolters Kluwer announces availability of ProVation Order Sets integration with Epic
Wolters Kluwer Heath has announced ProVation® Order Sets integration with Epic software to support the importing and exporting of information. This integration enables healthcare providers to streamline labor-intensive governance processes, optimise order set management and support existing order sets with evidence-based clinical content.
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 Oxford University Press appoints David Clark as new Managing Director for its Academic Division
Academic publisher Oxford University Press (OUP) has appointed David Clark, Senior Vice President for Health and Medical Sciences at Elsevier, as the new Managing Director of its Academic Division. David will succeed the outgoing Managing Director, Tim Barton, who leaves OUP in September after 25 years.
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 Kinokuniya Company named exclusive sales representative for SPIE Journals in Japan
SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, has announced an agreement establishing Kinokuniya Company Ltd. as its exclusive sales representative for SPIE Journals in Japan. Kinokuniya has a longstanding relationship with SPIE as the exclusive sales representative for the SPIE Digital Library in Japan.
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 Portico’s director of publisher relations, Stephanie Orphan, elected to OASPA board
Digital preservation service Portico has announced that its director of publisher relations, Stephanie Orphan, has been elected by the members of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) to serve on the board of directors for a term of three years. Joining the 10-member board this year are also Eelco Ferwerda (OAPEN), Paul Peters (Hindawi), and Franck Vazquez (MDPI).
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 Healio.com announces new release of ITJplus, provides physicians the cure for hours of reading
Medical website Healio.com has announced the new release of ITJplus, a time-saving, free resource that provides busy physicians with summaries of the top journal articles in medicine. ITJplus helps physicians keep up with all their medical journals, without the hours of reading. ITJplus reviews the literature and selects the most important articles from relevant scientific journals.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Tesla Advances Plans To Test Self-Driving, Electric Semi-Truck.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Vartabedian) reports that Tesla is “developing a long-haul, electric semi-truck that can drive itself and move in ‘platoons’ that automatically follow a lead vehicle, and is getting closer to testing a prototype” in Nevada. Meanwhile, officials in California will also be meeting with Tesla “to talk about Tesla’s efforts with autonomous trucks.” The article said that these plans “show that Tesla is putting self-driving technology into the electric truck it has said it plans to unveil in September, and is advancing toward real-life tests, potentially moving it forward in a highly competitive area of commercial transport also being pursued by Uber Technologies Inc and Alphabet Inc’s Waymo.” The article mentions that UPS’s diesel trucks “can travel up to 500 miles (800 km) on a single tank, according to UPS’s director of maintenance and engineering, international operations, Scott Phillippi.” In contrast, UPS’s electric local package delivery trucks can travel up to 80 miles on a full charge.

Supply Chain Dive Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Patrick) reports that while Tesla’s plans are not new to the industry, the combination of autonomy and sustainability may give the company “a leg up in the brewing competition.” The article highlights DHL as an example of a company that “already uses an entirely hybrid-electric trucking fleet in Manhattan, and plans to be fully electric in the next 30 years.”

Higher Education

University Of Arizona Summer Program Allows Students To Program Driverless Car.

Arizona Public Media Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8) reports nine students from colleges across the US took part in a summer program at the University of Arizona Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in which “they worked on programming driverless cars. The students spent the past 10 weeks working with faculty and graduate-student mentors on the UA’s ‘cognitive and autonomous test vehicle,’ learning how to program some aspect of the car.”

Some Coding Boot Camps Faltering After Initial Hype.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports, “The hype is fading for coding ‘boot camps,’” with a growing number of such schools closing. Reuters says the field is “jammed with programs promising to teach students in just weeks the skills needed to get hired as professional coders.” However, “at least eight schools have shut down or announced plans to close in 2017.” The piece reports that such schools have “mushroomed in recent years” amid rising demand for coders, but notes that “San Francisco’s Dev Bootcamp and The Iron Yard of Greenville, South Carolina, announced in July that they are being shut down by their corporate parents.”

Admissions SNAFU Sparks Ire Toward UC System.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, McPhate, Subscription Publication) reports that in the wake of the recent imbroglio at the University of California Irvine in which the school “withdrew admissions offers for nearly 500 students, the outrage spread far beyond the campus community.” The piece reports that the episode is not unique, noting that “since 2015 more than 4,000 applicants to U.C. campuses, aside from Irvine, have had their offers of admission rescinded — the bulk of them over paperwork problems.” The Times explains that colleges “sometimes underestimate how many students will accept their offers of admission, putting them in a bind to create room,” and says critics “say that too often campuses have resorted to looking for any excuse to revoke offers.”

New Law Limits New Jersey Student Loan Amounts.

Philly (PA) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that a new law “will limit the amount New Jersey college students can borrow from the state’s student loan program in an effort to prevent them from burdening themselves with debt.” The law “requires borrowers to exhaust their federal student loan options before taking out an NJCLASS loan” and “caps the amount they can borrow from the New Jersey Higher Education Student Assistance Authority at $150,000.”

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

NSF Gives Maine Lab $1.2 Million To Study Ocean Chemistry.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Angus King (I-ME) have announced that the National Science Foundation “is awarding a Maine marine science lab nearly $1.2 million to study the chemistry of the ocean.” The grant “will fund a Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences project about Sub-Antarctic Mode Water, which is an important water mass.”

ONR Gives Rochester Institute Of Technology Researcher Grant For Quantum Sensors.

The Rochester (NY) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that the Office of Naval Research has given Rochester Institute of Technology theoretical physicist Mishkat Bhattacharya a $550,000 grant to lead “a three-year study on precision quantum sensing.” Bhattacharya and his team “will test interactions between light and matter at the nanoscale and analyze measurements of weak electromagnetic fields and gravitational forces.”

Royal College Engineering Student Creates Ring To Control AR Displays.

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Murnane) reports that a student at the Innovation Design Engineering Program at the Royal College in London has created “a ring to control augmented reality (AR) displays,” calling the device “brilliant.” The piece explains that AR “overlays digital content on the physical world,” but is difficult to control easily and unobtrusively. “The large hand movements that are typical in virtual reality applications may have looked cool in Minority Report,” but are socially awkward, as is voice control. “Nat Martin set himself the problem of designing a control mechanism that can be used unobtrusively to meld AR displays with the user’s real-world environment.”

Toyota’s “Portal Project” To Use Hydrogen Fuel Cells To Achieve Zero-Emissions Freight Transport.

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Ewing) offers coverage of Toyota’s “Portal Project” to develop a hydrogen fuel cell “semi-tractor trailer rig capable of pulling 45,000 lbs. of cargo 200 miles” using the Mirai fuel cell fitted into a Kenworth Glider. Toyota Motor North America engineering manager for the Portal Project, Chris Rovik, says, “We took two Mirai vehicles, tore them apart and integrated components into the Kenworth. … The tanks are larger. Battery is larger. Motors are completely different from Mirai. But the two fuel-cell stacks are Mirai production units.” Rovik explains that “the main purpose is to prove scalability of the Mirai system with little change to the rest of the truck.”

Workforce

Some Manufacturing Leaders See “Technological” Solution To Skills Gap

Engineering Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Wright) reports that “there have been plenty of proposals for strengthening U.S. manufacturing – some point to the importance of improving American manufacturing technology, while others argue that those technological gains won’t matter without a skilled workforce.” The article discusses “another way to address the looming skills gap in manufacturing and elsewhere,” and suggest that “the imminent fourth industrial revolution and its smart factories of the future suggest that the solution may be a technological one.” The article discusses new “instruction software” that can “guide personnel through complex tasks and simultaneously monitor their performance” as an example of new technology that will impact manufacturing.

Global Developments

Chinese Developers File Antitrust Complaint Against Apple.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Abkowitz, Subscription Publication) reports a group of nearly 30 Chinese app developers has filed a complaint with the National Development and Reform Commission alleging Apple’s App Store violates antitrust regulations. The group claims Apple engages in monopolistic behavior when it removes apps from its marketplace without offering developers a detailed explanation, asserting also that Apple’s refusal to respond to queries in Chinese puts local developers at a disadvantage. An attorney for the group, Lin Wei, said, “There is a lack of transparency in the App Store operation. At this stage, we think complaining to the Chinese regulators to get them involved is most ideal.” Apple responded with a statement saying, in part, that “most submissions in China are reviewed and approved to be on the store within 48 hours, or less” and assuring developers that App store guidelines apply equally, regardless of country.

Amazon Seeks To Fill Over 1,000 Tech Positions In India.

The Economic Times (IND) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports on Amazon’s plans “to hire over 1,000 people, mostly software professionals, in India,” where Amazon needs people to “cater largely to research and development for the company’s divisions, including Amazon.com, Amazon.in, the devices business, and the could-computing division, Amazon Web Services.” Really though, Amazon is hiring “as many as possible,” the only limit being “the availability of talent in the required technologies,” the story says. Amazon India director of software development Dale Vaz says “We’re looking at a fully functional tech organisation in India and are hiring varied skills across several job families” in the cities of Bengaluru, Hyderabad, and Chennai.

French Road Paved With Solar Panels.

BBC News (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that “a stretch of road in France has been paved with solar PV (photovoltaic) panels as part of a government-backed initiative for renewable electricity generation.” BBC says “the solar PV panels are coated in crushed glass and resin to make them more durable. But the cost of making the almost half a mile of ‘Wattway’ was an estimated four to six times as much as covering the area with conventional solar panels.” Meanwhile, “the company aims to significantly reduce the cost in the future.”

Industry News

Ford Sends Investigators To Fix Carbon Monoxide Leak In Police Explorer SUVs.

The Detroit Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Lawrence) reports Ford has sent five investigative teams to police departments across the country to help “deal with reports of exhaust fumes inside their SUVs.” Engineers for the automaker are “blaming improperly installed or sealed aftermarket modifications, such as added emergency lights, for a rash of carbon monoxide complaints associated with police SUVs.” The SUVs are not part of a recall or investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, though Ford is “working quickly to address concerns that began to emerge last month.”

Ford said it has repaired more than 50 police Explorer SUVs in various municipalities where officers were sickened by fumes while driving, the Detroit News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports. In a statement, the company reiterated its intent to pay for repairs related to the carbon monoxide leak.

Additional coverage includes the AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9).

Engineering and Public Policy

Montana Coal Plant Operator Reverses Course, Says It’s Staying.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports “the operator of one of the largest coal-fired power plants in the Western U.S. says it intends to keep running the 2,100-megawatt plant after declaring last year that a new operator would be needed by mid-2018.” Spokesman Todd Martin said “the co-owners of the Colstrip Generating Station have decided Pennsylvania-based Talen Energy will keep running the southeastern Montana plant for the foreseeable future.” The AP says “Martin did not give a reason for the reversal.” The AP says “Montana lawmakers this year approved a measure allowing Talen to borrow up to $10 million annually to keep Colstrip fully operational until 2022” but “David Ewer with the Montana Board of Investments says no loan has been sought.”

West Virginia Governor: Trump Interested In Coal Payments.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Loh) reports that “West Virginia Governor Jim Justice said Donald Trump is ‘really interested’ in his plan to prop up Appalachian mining by giving federal money to power plants that burn the region’s coal.” Justice “announced at a West Virginia rally alongside President Trump last week that he’s becoming a Republican.” Bloomberg says he “has recently spent a ‘goodly amount of time’ meeting one-on-one with Trump and has liked the feedback to his pro-coal proposal.” The report says “the plan calls for the Department of Homeland Security to send $15 to eastern U.S. utilities for every ton of Appalachia coal they burn.” Justice told Bloomberg, “He’s really interested. He likes the idea. … Naturally, he’s trying to vet the whole process. It’s a complicated idea.”

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/10, Loh) reports that “critics say such a proposal would be expensive and misguided.” The report says “U.S. power plants burned at least 110 million short tons of Appalachian coal in 2016” and “a payment of $15 for each of those tons would cost at least $1.65 billion.” Justice also “said he’s discussed the plan with, among others, Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry, Vice President Mike Pence and Jared Kushner, Mr. Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law.”

California Bill Would Provide Larger Rebates For Electric Cars.

The San Francisco Business Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, McDermid, Subscription Publication) reports that “California lawmakers are considering a bill that would devote $3 billion to clean car incentives, including bigger rebates for consumer that buy electric cars or plug-in hybrids.” The report says “the bill, which is being sponsored by Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) and has already passed the California Assembly, will boost the incentives the state gives out to owners just as large automakers like General Motors and Tesla start bringing lower-priced electric cars to the mass market.” Ting said, “It’s time to be even more aggressive. … The reason we’re doing this now is there really hasn’t been electric vehicles for the mass market before. Most (electric vehicles) get 80 miles, and even if you live in San Francisco and you’ve got a 30-mile commute, you can get range anxiety pretty quickly.”

Minnesota Increases Wind Energy Capacity.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that new data from the “Department of Energy shows that Minnesota’s wind energy capacity increased nearly 10 percent last year.” The AP says “wind power accounts for nearly 18 percent of the electricity generated in the state,” putting the state at seventh in the nation for wind energy. The report said “the state has added enough new wind energy last year to power about 150,000 homes.” Minnesota Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman “says the low cost of wind power is competitive with other forms of electricity generation.”

Solar Power Industry Prepping For Solar Eclipse.

Vox Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9, Choi) reports that the August 21 total solar eclipse “will significantly diminish that capacity for a couple of hours on August 21, especially in California and North Carolina.” According to Steven Greenlee, spokesperson for the California Independent System Operator, “Our solar plants are going to lose over half of their ability to generate electricity during the two to two and a half hours that the eclipse will be impacting our area.” Vox says the “Energy Information Administration expects 1,900 utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) power plants in all will be affected.” Meanwhile, “the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) says it doesn’t expect the eclipse to create reliability issues for the bulk power system.” Still, according to Vox, “the eclipse will test the reliability of solar generation on a national scale, and challenge the preparedness of operators like CAISO.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

New Nonprofit Aims To Support African American Girls, Women In STEM Fields.

THE Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that a new nonprofit science education organization called the Black Girls Drive Foundation “wants more African American girls and young women to explore marine-related research and pursue careers in aquatic-based STEM fields.” The group “operates the STREAMS program, which integrates science, technology, robotics, engineering, the arts and mathematics with scuba diving. The program (open to Baltimore-area girls ages 9 or older through college-age freshmen) focuses on structural, mechanical and electrical technologies, with some exposure to optical, biotechnical, thermal and fluid technologies.”

NSF Gives Indiana Researchers Grant To Study Middle School STEM Engagement.

Inside INdiana Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that the National Science Foundation has given researchers at Purdue University and Indiana University a three-year $1.1 million grant to study “engagement in STEM activities in middle school science and math classes.” According to a statement form IU, “the researchers ‘will observe collaborative group engagement’ during the classes and ‘develop a theory and measures to help identify when students are effectively engaged in science and math.’”

Students Participate In Engineering Summer Institute.

The Baton Rouge (LA) Advocate Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) reports that from June 12 through July 6, 24 students from 15 schools across Kansas, Tennessee, Texas, and Louisiana participated in the Engineering Summer Institute at the Southern University campus in Baton Rouge. Courses in the program are aimed at developing “enrichment and advancement in mathematics; engineering; science; computer applications and programming; communications; critical thinking; ACT preparation; engineering projects and designs; and robotics.” Meanwhile, “Weekly field trips to industrial sites included the ExxonMobil Refinery in Baton Rouge and Chevron in Belle Chasse.”

Classroom Use Of Minecraft Evolves.

The NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) “NPR Ed” blog profiles Steven Isaacs, a technology teachers in Baskingridge, New Jersey, who is the co-founder of a new Minecraft festival “that set the Guinness World Record for largest gathering dedicated to a single video game.” The article explores how teachers across the country have embraced the game for classroom use, noting that they use the game “in every imaginable subject, from literature to social studies to math.” The piece explores how teachers aim to keep the game relevant as it becomes more mainstream.

College Students More Likely To Study STEM If High School Peers Enthused About Science.

Stephen Sawchuk writes at the Education Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/9) “Curriculum Matters” blog that according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances, “new college students are more likely to say they plan to pursue STEM careers when they were surrounded by other enthusiastic scientists-to-be in high school;—even controlling for factors like interest in science, previous achievement in the field, or parental support for studying science.” Sawchuk explains the study’s methodology and says the researchers “found a clear positive link between reported levels of peer interest in the high school classes and the college students’ likelihood of pursuing a job in a STEM-related career field.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 SLA Europe to be London Info International 2017 Association partner
London Info International has announced SLA Europe as an Association partner. SLA Europe will have a stand in the exhibition and all current members will be entitled to special discounts to attend the two-day conference. SLA Europe is a thriving network of information professionals who come together from across Europe to benefit from each others’ knowledge and experience.
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 Elsevier and AMA collaborate on outpatient coding eLearning courses
Elsevier and the American Medical Association (AMA) have announced that they will co-develop eLearning course content for Current Procedural Terminology (CPT®), the most widely accepted nomenclature in the U.S. to report outpatient and office medical procedures and services. CPT meets the data demands of the modern health care system by accurately describing complicated medical services with a simple five-digit numeric code and a clinical description of the service.
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 Clarivate Analytics board member Annette Thomas to lead Scientific and Academic Research business
Clarivate Analytics, the global provider of trusted insights and analytics to enable the research ecosystem to accelerate discovery, has announced that Annette Thomas, previously appointed to the Clarivate board, will join the company in September as Chief Executive Officer of its Scientific and Academic Research division, well-known for its industry-leading Web of Science platform. Thomas will lead the global team from its London office.
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 Neuroscience Bulletin commits to requiring ORCID iDs from authors
The Neuroscience Bulletin recently signed the ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) Open Letter committing to requiring ORCID iDs from authors. The international scholarly identifiers will be collected during submission using ScholarOne Manuscripts, enhancing the authors’ publishing experience. It is the first China-based journal to sign on to the commitment.
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 John Greivenkamp of Arizona University elected to SPIE presidential chain
SPIE Fellow John Greivenkamp, professor of optical science and ophthalmology at the College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, has been elected to serve as the 2018 Vice President of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. With his election, Greivenkamp joins the SPIE presidential chain and will serve as President-Elect in 2019 and as the society’s President in 2020.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

IBM’s Distributed Deep Learning Code Breaks Accuracy Record For Image Recognition.

TechRepublic Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Reese) reports IBM Research’s new deep learning model Distributed Deep Learning on Tuesday “made big strides in the field: It achieved a record for image recognition accuracy of 33.8%.” According to IBM, “the model, which used a massive data set of 7.5 million images, achieved ‘record communication overhead and 95% scaling efficiency on the Caffe deep learning framework over 256 GPUs in 64 IBM Power systems’… in just seven hours.” According to ZDNet Share to FacebookShare to
Twitter (8/8, Condon), the new “research tackles one of the major challenges of deploying deep learning: Large neural networks and large datasets help deep learning thrive but also lead to longer training times.” ZDNet adds that “training large-scale, deep learning-based AI models can take days or weeks.”

Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Moorhead) contributor Patrick Moorhead says IBM’s “groundbreaking Distributed Deep Learning (DDL) software…is one of the biggest announcements I’ve tracked in this space for the past six months.”

Higher Education

As Male Numbers Decline, Colleges Ramp Up Efforts To Boost Enrollment.

The Hechinger Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Marcus) that colleges around the country are seeing declining percentages of men on campus, citing ED statistics showing that “this fall, women will comprise more than 56 percent of students on campuses nationwide.” Colleges “reeling from a years-long decline in overall enrollment” are “suddenly paying new attention to bolstering the number of men who apply.” The piece reports that “the problem has its origins as early as primary school, only to be fueled later on by economic forces that discourage men from believing a degree is worth the time and money.”

Signs: Tuition Increases Could Be Nearing Peak.

The NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8) “NPR Ed” blog reports that despite decades of steady increases in tuition rates at US colleges, “there are signs that the decades-long rise in college costs is nearing a peak.” Over the last 12 months, tuition “rose in line with inflation,” whereas “from 1990 through 2016, tuition grew at a rate more than double that of inflation, year after year.” The article points to factors leading to decreasing college enrollment over the past decade, explaining that “lower demand can lead to deeper discounts, especially from private, nonprofit colleges.”

UC Irvine Admission Episode Illustrates Difficulties In Predicting Enrollment Numbers.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Watanabe, Xia) reports on the recent incident at UC Irvine in which the school received a bumper crop of acceptances from prospective students, leading the school to rescind offers to hundreds of hopefuls. The Times reports that experts say such cases “underscore the vagaries of enrollment prediction — a discipline that aims to meld the science of data analysis with the guesswork of anticipating teenage whims.”

From ASEE
Norman Fortenberry Letter in Washington Post
ASEE’s ED challenged the Post (and other media outlets) to properly distinguish between engineers and scientists when appropriate.

ASEE Annual Conference Video Highlights
Good Day Columbus broadcast LIVE from our exhibit hall. (Click the picture to play the video)

Interview with NSF Director France Córdova.

The Conference “Living Wall.”

Members on the next big thing in engineering education.

Research and Development

US Military Grows Closer To Using Laser Weapons, Railguns.

Business Insider Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Brown) reports that the US military is showing increasing interest in lasers and railguns. The former fires “pure energy bursts” while the latter uses “electromagnets to fire projectiles at supersonic speeds.” The US Navy test-fired a railgun for the first time in 2012, while two years later, the Navy “mounted and tested a laser on the USS Ponce.” A US Army Apache helicopter more recently successfully tested a mounted laser. Despite the successful tests, Bob Freeman, a spokesman for the Office of Naval Research, said the two weapons are not currently optional, and that the laser aboard the Ponce is “not the final product.”

California Startup Focused On Developing “Modular Pods” For Group Transport.

The San Francisco Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Salian, Thadani) reports that “a San Jose startup is rethinking the way groups travel: Picture a long string of connected pods that can drive themselves.” The Chronicle adds that the startup, Next Future Transportation, “says it’s developing a modular transportation system, consisting of individual pod vehicles that connect and disconnect with one another to get people from place to place.” The article says that “CEO Emmanuele Spera imagines a string of pods starting off at an airport, collecting passengers who are assigned seats based on their final destinations,” and then the pods would drop off their riders “following an algorithmically determined route.” The Chronicle also writes that “the company is trending on startup database Crunchbase because it has been generating buzz in the Middle East from media outlets and potential partners.”

Cubesats Cannot Be Used For Some NASA Applications.

Space News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Foust, Subscription Publication) reports that NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center chief technologist for the applied engineering and technology directorate, Michael Johnson, presented materials at the 31st Annual Conference on Small Satellites on Sunday. Johnson warned that the lack of assurance about cubesat reliability will prevent NASA from using the cubesats for some applications.

California Energy Commission Offers $44.7 Million In Microgrid Grants.

In continuing coverage, Power Engineering Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8) reports the California Energy Commission is offering $44.7 million in grants for microgrid programs, in an effort “to develop microgrid designs that can be put into continual service, and drive down future development costs.” Projects must be located within the service territories of Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric, or Pacific Gas & Electric.

Wyoming Welcomes New Supercomputer.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Gruver) reports that “one of the world’s fastest supercomputers is helping scientists better understand the sun’s behavior and predict weather months in advance but also got touted Tuesday as an important tool for diversifying Wyoming’s economy, which has seen better days.” The AP says “the new supercomputer named Cheyenne, located at a National Center for Atmospheric Research facility on the outskirts of Wyoming’s capital city, is the world’s 22nd fastest.” Gov. Matt Mead said at a dedication for the new machine Tuesday that “the facility also is an important tool for research into hydrology, ways to trap carbon dioxide emitted by coal-fired power plants and other science important to Wyoming.”

Universities Of Connecticut, Rhode Island Receive $1.3 Million US Navy Grant.

The Hartford (CT) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8) reports the US Navy’s Office of Naval Research awarded the University of Connecticut and the University of Rhode Island a $1.3 million three-year grant “to create a community of students, faculty, government and industry leaders that will strive to expand the Navy science and technology workforce.” The universities will divide the grant “to establish joint programs, making it possible to educate and train workers who will be a pipeline to the naval community, which is vital to the economic livelihood of the region.” The region hosts the Naval Submarine Base, the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, and Raytheon, “where a dramatic increase in hiring is expected.” The grant is expected to link “those institutions, plus the two universities, to create the Southeast New England STEM Coalition,” through which the two universities “will launch a new concentration in naval science and technology.”

Washington University In St. Louis To Establish Neurotechnology Hub With NSF Grant.

The St. Louis Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Subscription Publication) reports the National Science Foundation awarded a $2.6 million grant to Washington University in St. Louis to create establish a NeuroNex neurotechnology hub. Yehuda Ben-Shahar, a biology professor, is the lead investigator, and will focus on how neuroscience applies to animal behavior research.

Workforce

After Dismissal, Google Memo Author Files NLRB Complaint.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Weise) reports that James Damore – the Google software engineer who authored the controversial memo that has drawn praise and criticism and that resulted in Damore’s firing on Monday – filed a National Labor Relations Board complaint against Google on Tuesday, according to the agency’s website. Jason Geller, a partner with management-side employment law firm Fisher and Phillips, said that while “it’s impossible to know exactly what Damore is alleging, in general these types of filings tend to involve claims that the former employee was engaged in what’s known as ‘concerted protected activity’ under the National Labor Relations Act.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Wakabayashi, Subscription Publication) reports on Damore’s firing, saying his “contentious” memo “enraged” advocates “of greater diversity in the technology industry” and “served as a rallying cry for conservatives and the alt-right who view Google – and Silicon Valley – as a bastion of groupthink where people with different opinions are shamed into silence.” Damore “said he had not expected this type of reaction when he shared his missive last week,” but added that he has received “many personal messages from fellow Googlers expressing their gratitude.” The Times highlights Damore’s “impressive academic background” and statements by his critics.

In a front-page article, the Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, A1, Nicas, Koh, Subscription Publication) reports that Google CEO Sundar Pichai said in an email on Monday to employees that the memo pushed “harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace,” and he added that the suggestion that “colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not OK.”

Industry News

Concerns Emerge Over Autonomous Cars Living Up To Investment Hype.

While car manufacturers continue to pursue autonomous vehicle technology, Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Taylor, Lienert) reports on “a concern that robocars may not live up to the profit expectations that drove an initial investment rush.” The article adds that “carmakers are increasingly looking to forego outright ownership of future autonomous driving systems in favor of spreading the investment burden and risk,” which amounts to a shift from a year ago when carmakers were eagerly pursuing “standalone strategies” in developing the technology. Reuters adds that “dozens of companies – including carmakers and tech firms like Google and Uber – are vying for a market which, according to consulting firm Frost & Sullivan, will only make up about 10 to 15 percent of vehicles in Europe by 2030.” The article quotes BMW Vice President for Autonomous Driving Projects Klaus Buettner saying, “Everybody is investing billions. Our view was that it makes sense to club together to develop some core systems as a platform.” Reuters also points out that “Ford and General Motors are investing at least $2 billion each to develop self-driving vehicles for urban ride-sharing fleets beginning in 2021, competing with incumbents and start-ups.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Research Identifies Solar Power Supplier Cyber Vulnerabilities.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Sobczak, Subscription Publication) reports, that “Willem Westerhof, a security researcher with Amsterdam-based cybersecurity firm Insite Security BV, uncovered 17 vulnerabilities in products from a German solar power supplier while working as an intern last year.” Westerhof “says the flaws in SMA Solar Technology AG inverters and power management platforms could be exploited to disrupt electricity on Europe’s increasingly solar-reliant grid, in an attack scenario he called ‘Horus.’” He presented his findings at the SHA2017 hacker conference. He said, “I’m trying to show that this is a very serious problem across the sector. … The scale at which I could do this surprised me, and the fact that it’s secured so poorly.” He also said, “You could do the same research on other devices as well, and I think you’d get the same result. … It would be a different kind of attack, but the kind of actors that are going to do this scenario are well capable of finding these vulnerabilities.”

South Carolina Sues DOE Over SRS Plutonium Removal.

The Aiken (SC) Standard Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Biles) reports that “the South Carolina Attorney General’s Office filed a lawsuit Monday [in the Court of Federal Claims] against the federal government to recover $100 million the U.S. Department of Energy owes the state for failing to meet its promise to remove one ton of plutonium from the Savannah River Site this year.” The report explains that the state also “sought the 2016 payments in the pending case before the federal court in South Carolina, but Federal Judge Michelle Childs ruled that the state should file the claim in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.” The Standard says “the State intends to pursue the 2016 money when that matter concludes.” The federal government cannot “renege on its obligations” and “leave South Carolina as the permanent dumping ground for weapons-grade plutonium,” South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson said in the complaint.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Kinnard) also explains that “President Barack Obama’s final executive budget allocated money to begin shutting the project down.” Meanwhile, “in a budget proposal released in May, the Trump administration followed the Obama administration’s lead, proposing to mothball the project and pursue an alternative disposition method for the plutonium.”

State Lawmakers Discuss How To Respond To Drones.

The State House News Service (MA) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Metzger, Subscription Publication) reports that “the question of how far a homeowner or law enforcement can go to stop a pesky drone came up Monday as state lawmakers from across the country, lawyers and a Federal Aviation Administration official discussed the emerging unmanned aircraft system (U.A.S.) technology.” Marke “Hoot” Gibson, a retired major general in the US Air Force, “said the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy have some ‘limited capability’ to take down dangerous drones, and Congress is interested in expanding the government’s authority to protect the public from threats posed by drones.” The report says “the drone discussion took place at a panel organized by the National Conference of State Legislatures, which is meeting at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center this week.”

DOE Warns Of “Uncertain” Future For Wind.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Martin) reports that “America’s booming wind energy sector faces questions over its long-term growth prospects as federal incentives are scaled back amid weak natural gas prices and modest electricity demand, according to the Department of Energy.” According to reports released by DOE Tuesday, “the U.S. wind industry added more than 8,200 megawatts of capacity in 2016, representing 27 percent of all energy additions.” Meanwhile, “in 2016, wind supplied about 6 percent of U.S. electricity, with Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma and California leading the way among individual states.” The DOE said, “At the same time, the prospects for growth beyond the current production tax credit cycle remain uncertain, given declining federal tax support, expectations for low natural gas prices and modest electricity demand growth.”

Greenwire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Marshall, Subscription Publication) also reports that DOE said “forecasts after 2021 show a downturn because of the PTC phaseout, low natural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth and less of a push from state renewable portfolio standards.” However, the report said, “At the same time, the potential for continued technological advancements and cost reductions enhance the prospects for longer-term growth, as does burgeoning corporate demand for wind energy.”

Report Says Closing Indian Power Plant Could Lead To NYC Blackouts.

The Daily Caller Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Pearce) reports that a new study from the Manhattan Institute claims that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo “is risking the stability of New York City’s electrical grid by closing a nearby nuclear plant that supplies a quarter of the city’s total electricity.” The Cuomo administration aims to provide half of the state’s electricity through renewables by 2030, however, the study says Cuomo has “narrowed” options for alternative sources of energy by “blocking construction of new natural gas pipelines, effectively cutting off gas generators as a cheap substitute.”

Environmentalists Oppose Biomass Subsidies At Massachusetts Energy Resources Hearing.

The Greenfield (MA) Recorder Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Christensen) reports that “more than 70 people gathered at Holyoke Community College on Monday for the state’s last public hearing on plans to designate the burning of fuel derived from trees as eligible for clean-energy subsidies.” The Recorder says that “as part of a 2014 law backed by the logging industry, the state has included biomass boilers in its ‘Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard,’ along with geothermal, solar thermal and other technologies.” The Massachusetts “Department of Energy Resources is now drafting regulations to implement that law.” The report says “proponents of the rules say that when combined with sustainable forestry practices, biomass can be a renewable energy source that can compete with fossil fuels.” However, environmentalists “cite research that shows biomass can produce more greenhouse gas emissions than fossil fuels.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

School Districts Around The Country Weigh Benefits, Risk Of Having School On Day Of Solar Eclipse.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Strauss) reports that “school districts across the country that are beginning the 2017-18 school year in early to mid-August” are having “to decide whether to let students stay home – or come to class – on the day of the Great American Eclipse” on Monday, August 21. Many districts are deciding for safety reasons that it would be better to let students stay home, whereas in other areas officials are deciding to keep students in school that day for the same reason. For example, “in Georgia, some school districts are extending the school day so that students can watch it under adult supervision, each of them with free protective glasses.”

California Schools, Museums Prepare Educational Events For Solar Eclipse. EdSource Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/7, Jones) reports on that with the approach of the August 21 North American solar eclipse “coinciding with the start of school for thousands of California students, teachers around the state will be using the rare solar spectacle to ignite students’ interest in science, showing them first-hand evidence that the earth rotates around the sun, the moon spins around the earth, and all three of them are undeniably round.” Science museums around the state will also be hosting various educational events to celebrate the eclipse.

Arizona Charter School Board Member Outlines Recent Successes.

SySTEM Schools board member Francine Hardaway, in a piece for Phoenix Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/8, Subscription Publication), outlines the recent successes observed at SySTEM Schools, a charter school founded by Angelica Cruz to prepare inner city children “for the careers we know will be available in the future – those requiring science, technology, engineering and math, in addition to reading, writing and the arts.” The school just started its fourth academic year this week, and after three years of less-than-desirable results, SySTEM has “achieved product-market fit with the right reagents.” Hardaway says student test performances have gained “a year and a half for every year they stay at SySTEM.” She adds that enrolled students have expressed desires to “find cures for diseases, become award-winning authors, explore outer space, become white hat hackers, and invent apps that help solve worldwide problems like hunger and poverty,” leaving school leaders “in awe of their excitement for STEM and project-based learning.”

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 SSRN launches ChemRN – a new network dedicated to chemistry
Elsevier, the information analytics business specialising in science and health, has announced that SSRN, its working paper repository and preprint server, has launched the Chemistry Research Network – ChemRN. The launch of ChemRN follows hot on the heels of the BioRN launch in June 2017, SSRN’s new network dedicated to biology and its first outside the social sciences.
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 Crystal Stone joins SSP as General Manager
The Society for Scholarly Publishing has announced Crystal Stone as the new General Manager. Crystal is an accomplished association management professional with more than 12 years of expertise in helping organisations and volunteers reach new levels of success.
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 Zynx Health introduces FHIR-standard API to deliver evidence-based content for enhanced care
Evidence- and experience-based clinical improvement solutions provider Zynx HealthTM has announced the availability of the Zynx Health API, which provides access to Zynx content in the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard format. Third-party solution developers and providers can leverage Zynx Health’s API-based content to help healthcare organisations enhance their delivery of patient care while expanding their own footprint within the growing healthcare sector.
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 eLife joins Substance Consortium; supports development of open-source online content-editing tools
eLife recently joined a consortium of organisations committed to supporting Substance, a JavaScript library of tools for web-based content editing. As an open-source project first started in 2010, Substance provides the building blocks for realising custom text editors and web-based publishing systems that are critical in establishing an open-source ecosystem for knowledge creation and dissemination.
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 Frontiers in Physiology launches new specialty section – Avian Physiology
Frontiers in Physiology has announced a new specialty section on Avian Physiology. Professor Colin G. Scanes of the University of Arkansas is leading the new section as Specialty Chief Editor. According to Prof. Scanes, Avian Physiology will provide an innovative platform specifically dedicated to the physiology of wild birds and, at the same time, to the physiology of poultry.
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