Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Clarivate Analytics collaborates with Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings to support early career researchers
Clarivate Analytics, the global provider of trusted insights and analytics that accelerate the pace of innovation, has announced its collaboration with the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, supporting the annual series of highly esteemed scientific meetings of Nobel Prize-winning laureates and select early career researchers from across the globe. Clarivate will contribute a customised analysis tool for emerging chemistry research fronts for the over 400 early career scientists attending the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting (#LiNo17).
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 Society for Scholarly Publishing recognises seven members for outstanding contributions at 2017 Annual Meeting
The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) recognized the efforts of seven deserving individuals at its recent Annual Meeting held in Boston, MA, May 31- June 2. Ann Michael, Chair of the Nominating and Awards Committee and 2016-2017 SSP Past President presented Mary Beth Barilla, Publisher Relations Director, RedLink; Lori Carlin, Director, Marketing & Senior Consultant, Delta Think; Yael Fitzpatrick, and Michael Clarke, President, Clarke and Company with the SSP Appreciation Award. The award recognises the work of individuals whose recent actions have benefited SSP and the scholarly communication field.
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 Wolters Kluwer to publish the Canadian Journal of Addiction
Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced a new publishing partnership with the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM). Beginning with the December 2017 issue, Wolters Kluwer will publish the Canadian Journal of Addiction, the official journal of the CSAM, as part of its Lippincott journal portfolio.
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 Eastern Michigan University goes live with Alma and Summon integration
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that Eastern Michigan University has gone live with the Ex Libris Alma® library services platform integrated with the Ex Libris Summon® discovery service. The first library to implement this integrated solution, Eastern Michigan now benefits from improved resource management workflows and an optimised resource discovery experience.
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 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. and Burgundy Information Services announce expanded representation agreement
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers has announced expanded subscription sales representation by Burgundy Information Services in Australia, New Zealand and Turkey. These regions join current representation by Burgundy Information Services in the UK, Europe, Russia, and South Africa and extend the companies’ cooperation through 2020.
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 Physicians Postgraduate Press to preserve e-journals with Portico
Digital preservation service Portico has announced that Physicians Postgraduate Press (PPP) is preserving their electronic content with Portico, ensuring that it will be secure and available into the future. PPP has been a leading medical publisher for nearly 80 years. PPP is the publisher of 2 medical journals, the CME Institute, and various websites, eg, Psychiatrist.comNeurologyKnowledge.com, and microsites.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Trump Administration To Focus On Energy This Week.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Cama) reports “this week” has been designated by the Trump Administration as “Energy Week” in an effort “to promote the president’s energy agenda.” President Trump and members of his Administration at events throughout the week “will push their quest for ‘energy dominance,’ a term officials are using for their goal to become the world’s energy superpower.” On Monday, a White House spokeswoman said, “President Trump is committed to utilizing our abundant domestic energy resources both to create jobs and a growing, prosperous economy at home and to strengthen America’s global influence and leadership abroad.” An event on Thursday will “feature Trump, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt in an ‘American Energy Dominance Panel,’ followed by a speech by Trump on ‘energy dominance.’” The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Siciliano) reports that according to the spokeswoman “the week will be marked by a number of announcements…noting events and speeches by Trump and his Cabinet leading up to the July 4 holiday.” Trump on Wednesday will “host governors and tribal leaders for a discussion about local and state energy, she said.”

The Daily Caller Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Pearce) reports Perry will deliver “a keynote address at the annual U.S. Energy Information Conference taking place Monday and Tuesday.” Perry “tweeted about #EnergyWeek Monday morning.” The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Siciliano) reports that according Perry, “this week will also reaffirm our commitment to clean energy.” He said, “The binary choice between being pro-economy and pro-environment that was perpetuated by the Obama administration, it set up a false argument,” and that the Trump administration “can do good for both.”

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Cama, Henry) also reports, “Energy Week is one of numerous designations that the White House has made in recent weeks to try to focus on particular pieces of Trump’s agenda, such as infrastructure and technology.” During those weeks, “other policy news dominated national headlines, including healthcare reform and the investigations into Russian involvement in last year’s election.” The “Energy 202” blog of the Washington Post, Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Grandoni) the “Morning Energy” blog of Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Wolff) and the AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) also provides coverage. also previewed the week.

Higher Education

Students Of Fraudulent For-Profit Colleges Still Waiting For Debt Relief.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Binkley) reports on the plight of former students at failed for-profit colleges who were “promised by the U.S. Education Department under President Barack Obama that her federal loans would be forgiven by now.” The piece says students are concerned about the continuing financial burdens and “advocates say the pipeline to loan forgiveness appears to have slowed since President Donald Trump took office, stirring concern that some students may be left in the lurch, and that the department is veering from its predecessor’s work to rein in fraudulent for-profit colleges.” However, ED officials “dispute that claim, saying they’re working quickly to clear a backlog that was inherited from the previous administration.”

University Leaders Cautiously Optimistic About SCOTUS Move On Travel Ban.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Svrluga) reports that President Trump’s push for a travel ban on six mostly Muslim countries sparked opposition from university leaders who warned “it would hinder research and recruitment of the best talent in the world.” This week, “some university leaders welcomed a Supreme Court ruling that Trump also claimed as a victory.” The court “agreed to allow a limited version of the ban to take effect, carving out exceptions that appear to exempt university students, faculty and lecturers.” The piece quotes Association of American Universities President Mary Sue Coleman saying in a statement, “While we are still reviewing the Court’s decision, the Court has rightly recognized that students, faculty, and lecturers from the designated countries have a bona fide relationship with an American entity and should not be barred from entering the United States.”

From ASEE
Annual Conference Blog
Keep up with the goings-on at the #ASEEAnnual with our daily blog.

Watford Assumes Presidency
Bevlee Watford will become the ASEE president at the society’s annual conference in Columbus, OH on June 28.

VIDEO – 2017 Global Colloquium in the Azores
This event, September 16-18 (in conjunction with the SEFI Annual Conference), links engineering educators across international borders and brings together lecturers, researchers, and corporate colleagues for an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and perspectives.

VIDEO – 2017 ASEE International Forum at the ASEE Annual Conference
A special registration rate of $150 is available to ASEE Annual Conference Registrants.  This short videohas details of the event, on Wednesday of the conference.

Research and Development

Duke University Students Design 3D-Printed Spinal Cages.

An online CNN Money Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/22, Dangerfield) video profiles Duke University mechanical engineering students who are working with surgeons to design and 3D-print spinal cages. The technique is already used in Germany and India. The technique requires the FDA’s approval prior to its use in American surgeries.

University Of Central Florida Researchers’ Smartphone Screen Modeled After Moth Eyes.

NBC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Yiu) “Inside Science” reports University of Central Florida researchers published a paper in the journal Optica this week describing an anti-reflection film optimized “specifically for smartphone screens, and they also provide a model that other researchers can use to optimize their own films.” NBC News says engineers and materials scientists have often modeled their anti-reflection films after moths’ eyes, which feature surface-level nanoscale structures that minimize light reflection. Likewise, the UCF team led by Shin-Tson Wu deposited a solution of nanoscale silicon oxide spheres measuring about 100 nanometers across onto a surface that was then dimpled to create “the nanoscale structure that mimics what moths have on the surface of their eyes.” Stanford University material scientist Dietmar Knipp, who was not involved in the research, explained that “imprinting is usually a good choice,” but Wu conceded the process loosened some of the nanoparticles, rendering the dimpling stamp unusable.

NASA Considers Close-Up Mission To Uranus, Neptune.

On its website, Fox News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports NASA released a 529-page study that outlined several of its potential mission ideas in support of the National Research Council’s forthcoming Planetary Science Decadal Survey, which “is used to help determine what missions NASA should pursue.” NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory planetary scientist Mark Hofstadter, one of the two co-chairs on the team that published the report, stated, “This [NASA] study argues the importance of exploring” either Uranus or Neptune and their “entire environment, which includes surprisingly dynamic icy moons, rings and bizarre magnetic fields.” NASA Goddard Space Flight Center senior scientist of planetary atmospheres research and study co-chair Amy Simon explained further, “We do not know how these planets formed and why they and their moons look the way they do.” She continued, “There are fundamental clues as to how our solar system formed and evolved that can only be found by a detailed study of one, or preferably both of these planets.”

Experts Hope US Budget Cuts To Scientific Research Don’t Block Climate Data.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports that President Trump’s proposed budget cuts for federally-funded science research has spurred research institutes and universities in Europe to informally pursue policies aimed recruiting American scientists. More consequential than a potential “brain drain” would be the impact of budget cuts on US climate data, particularly that generated by NASA’s Earth-science research and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research office. Satellite data, for example, is a “key area of U.S. leadership,” according to Michael Oppenheimer, professor at Princeton University.

Global Developments

Israeli Government, Start-Ups Address Projected Technology Workforce Shortage.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Cohen) reports Israel’s rapidly-growing technology industry “accounts for 14 percent of economic output and 50 percent of exports.” The Israeli Innovation Authority, however, warned the nation faces an estimated shortage “of 10,000 engineers and programmers over the next decade in a market that employs 140,000.” The shortage is particularly concerning for the nation’s approximately 5,000 start-up companies that “compete for talent with development centers of technology giants such as Google, Intel, Microsoft and Apple,” says Reuters, that they have incentivized in ways “that a startup cannot afford.” The shortage has been attributed in part to declining new labor force; computer science, math, and statistics graduates dropped from 3,000 in 2005 to 1,600 in 2008. The government is also “preparing 500 visas for students from abroad who studied science and engineering at Israeli universities so they can stay to work at tech firms for a year.” It also intends to ease “bureaucratic hurdles to unlimited ‘expert visas.’”

Texas A&M Wins DOE Grant To Help India Build Power Grid.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Hunn) reports Texas A&M University has won an Energy Department “grant to help India improve its electrical power grid and add energy storage capacity.” The university “is part of a team of scientists from U.S. and Indian government, universities and private companies that received almost $30 million to install new smart grid and energy storage technology to build an ‘advanced distribution grid.’” The DOE grant totals $7.5 million. According to officials, the rest will be covered by India’s Ministry of Science and Technology. DOE officials said that “the technology will help both countries modernize power grids.” In a statement Energy Secretary Rick Perry said, “This new consortium demonstrates the U.S. and Indian commitments to ensuring access to affordable and reliable energy in both countries.” Energy Secretary Rick Perry said in a statement.

CSMonitor: Renewable Energy Adoption Spreading Across The Globe.

An editorial in the Christian Science Monitor Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) claims that the growth in renewable energy adoption stems from “commitment by governments and farsighted businesses to fund cleaner energy sources,” as well as the “plummeting prices of renewables.” Renewables “now account for more than half of new power sources going on line,” which according to the Monitor, means that economic growth and the fight against climate change no longer have to be an either/or equation.

Industry News

Microsoft Among Companies Forming Working Group To Fight Terrorism.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Fioretti) reports “Facebook, Google’s YouTube, Twitter and Microsoft said on Monday they were forming a global working group to combine their efforts to remove terrorist content from their platforms.” The companies plan to share “technical solutions for removing terrorist content, commission research to inform their counter-speech efforts and work more with counter-terrorism experts.”

Engineering and Public Policy

GTM Research: Solar Projects Would Be Harmed By Trade Tariffs.

The “Morning Energy” blog of Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Wolff) reported a GTM Research report out Monday “finds that if Trump implements the solar import trade tariffs solar panel makers Suniva and SolarWorld Americas are seeking, it could wipe out nearly two-thirds of the solar projects set to be built in the U.S. cumulatively from 2018 through 2022.” The report found “between 36.1 gigawatts and 47.5 gigawatts might fall to the wayside if Trump sets tariffs and minimum prices for imported solar panels and cells.” The report states it “could send shockwaves through the U.S. solar industry.”

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Ryan) reports “GTM found the biggest impact of tariffs would likely be on large-scale unity solar farms, which compete as an alternative to natural gas.” Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Groom) also provides coverage of this story.

Elementary/Secondary Education

Michigan Governor Proposes Changing High School Graduation Requirements To Promote CTE.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has proposed making his state’s high school graduation rates “more flexible,” including “a mandatory career readiness course.” He said the changes are necessary “to help students fill in-demand jobs in the trades.” Snyder called for lawmakers “to mandate that a career exploration/job skills class be completed in seventh or eighth grade. He said computer science should count to meet a foreign language requirement and that students should be able to fulfill health and physical education requirements by completing career health programs.”

The Mt. Pleasant (MI) Morning Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports Snyder “announced a new set of partnerships and recommendations aimed at strengthening career technical education throughout the state” called the Michigan Career Pathways Alliance. The proposed changes “are meant to assist students in finding and understanding technical career pathways through several initiatives including curriculum changes, adding resources within school districts and increasing collaboration between educators and employers.”

Crain’s Detroit Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports that under the plan, “people with private sector expertise in the skilled trades would be able to earn an expedited teaching credential to teach vocational courses in Michigan schools.” Snyder “also intends to allow teachers and school counselors to earn required professional development and continuing education credit through externships with local employers or at career-technical centers.”

Code.org Releases Middle School Computer Science Course.

The Seattle Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports about 30 school districts in Washington will implement “CS Discoveries,” the latest computer course developed by the Seattle nonprofit Code.org. The free course will teach seventh, eighth, and ninth graders how to code and introduce them to the computer’s physical components. Code.org is best known for its “Hour of Code” campaign aimed at encouraging children to code with “online tutorials featuring popular characters such as those from Frozen and Star Wars.” Code.org said tens of millions of users have participated in the campaign. Code.org chief executive Hadi Partovi stated, “We realized that middle schools in the country increasingly want to teach computer science and replace outdated tech-ed courses” that teach skills like Internet browsing and typing, which most children already know at that age. The Times notes Code.org also “focuses on teaching computer science to girls, minorities and low-income students – populations typically under-represented in the tech industry.”

Kansas State University Receives Grant For High School STEM Education Program.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26) reports the US Department of Agriculture awarded Kentucky State University a $147,469 grant to be distributed over three years and used to introduce high school students to science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM. KSU said it will offer short lectures and hands-on demonstrations to deepen participating students’ understanding of STEM, with a focus on agriculture and aquaculture. The university has already committed to working with seven high schools.

Colorado Universities Host STEM Summer Camps For Girls.

The Denver Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Chuang) reports Regis University and the University of Denver announced they are offering girls in middle school full scholarships to attend their SciTech week-long summer camps. The goal is to introduce underrepresented female students to science, technology, engineering, and math subjects and careers. Each girl will “work with female science and technology professors and explore topics from astronomy, computer programming and neuroscience,” and receive a telescope, Raspberry Pi computer, and circuitry to light up their clothing. The Ball Foundation of Broomfield’s Ball Corp. is financing the Regis-hosted SciTech camp, and a “Public Good Fund” grant is supporting the DU camp.

Pennsylvania CTE Students Extended Alternative Graduation Avenue.

Education Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter’s (6/26) “High School and Beyond” blog reports Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf signed into law last week a measure granting career and technical education students an alternative path to graduation. Under Pennsylvania law, high school students who intend to graduate in the 2018-19 school year and beyond must pass the Keystone algebra, biology, and literature exams. The new law will allow high school CTE “concentrators” to instead “demonstrate proficiency by completing the academic requirements in Keystone-exam subjects, and earning an industry-recognized credential or showing ‘readiness for continued meaningful engagement’ in their chosen program of study through tests, course grades or other evidence of mastery.” Wolf said in a statement, “With this measure, Pennsylvania will recognize that diversity and will no longer hold all students to the standard of a Keystone Examination, which too often doesn’t reflect the reality of a large sector students’ educational experience.”

Monday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Clarivate Analytics partners with Impactstory to make open access content easier for researchers to use
Clarivate Analytics has announced a novel public/private strategic partnership with Impactstory that will remove a critical barrier for researchers: limited open access (OA) to high-quality, trusted peer-reviewed content. Under the terms of the partnership, Clarivate Analytics is providing a grant to Impactstory to build on its oaDOI service, making open access content more easily discoverable, and the research workflow more efficient from discovery through publishing.
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 OASIS operates with Alma and Alexander Street
ProQuest is simplifying workflows for librarians with two initiatives that bring together complementary assets to enrich its OASIS® search, select and order system. The OASIS system saves librarians’ time with ordering, tracking and invoicing content – print, ebook and DVDs – in the subjects they need.
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 SAE International adopts Aries Systems’ Editorial Manager manuscript service for Journals and Technical Paper process
SAE International has adopted Aries Systems’ Editorial Manager® system for use with its Journals and Written-Only Technical Paper process. Editorial Manager is a cloud-based manuscript submission and peer-review tracking system for scholarly journals, reference works, books and other publications.
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 EBSCO Information Services announces 2017 EBSCO Solar grant winners
EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) is awarding its 2017 EBSCO Solar grant to the Athens-Clarke County Library in Athens, Georgia and The Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling, Illinois. The grants will provide each library with $100,000 to pay for the installation of a solar array. The grant offsets the cost of installing solar panels and allows libraries to reduce their electricity expenditures.
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 PeerJ announces PeerJ Collection for SMBE 2017 attendees to make their abstracts publicly available
PeerJ will be publishing a PeerJ Collection for the upcoming Annual Meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (SMBE 2017) in Austin, TX. The meeting will take place from July 2-6, 2017. All speakers and poster presenters are encouraged to submit their accepted abstracts to the Collection.
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 OCLC celebrates 50 years of innovation and collaboration with libraries worldwide
OCLC, the library technology and research organisation that changed the way libraries work, is celebrating 50 years of innovation and collaboration with libraries around the world. What began 50 years ago as a regional computer system for 54 Ohio colleges has become OCLC, a global library cooperative that provides shared technology services, original research and community programs to over 16,000 libraries in 120 countries.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Autonomous Vehicles Being Tested In More Cities, States.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25) reports online that as predictions about the future size of the autonomous vehicle industry continue to rise, “in some cities, automakers, suppliers and technology companies are clustering to test their self-driving vehicles,” while elsewhere “governors and mayors are beckoning the industry by changing laws or touting other inducements.” The story examines some of the “different” ways cities are approaching and attracting the autonomous industry.

The Rochester (NY) Democrat & Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Lahman) reports New York had outlawed operating a vehicle without having at least one human hand on the steering wheel at all times since 1971, “but the state budget approved in April included a pilot program to allow testing of driverless vehicles under certain strict conditions.”

The Winston-Salem (NC) Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/24, Daniel) reports with comments about the possibility of autonomous vehicles sharing public roads in South Carolina from an engineer with the state Transportation Department’s Transportation Mobility and Safety Division, Kevin Lacy.

Higher Education

Florida International University Launches Internet Of Things Degree.

The Miami Herald Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23) reports that Florida international University is launching a degree program to teach students about “all aspects of ‘the internet of things,’” noting that the program is being headed up by computer science professor Kemal Akkaya. The article describes a number of emerging applications related to the Internet of Things, and says that this is the first such degree program in Florida, and possibly in the US.

Proposed EDMC Sale Sparks Concerns Among Accreditors, Regulators.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Moore) reports that Education Management Corp.’s plan to “sell the Art Institutes and its other schools to the Dream Center Foundation” is raising concerns from accreditation agencies that have reviewed the deal. Though EDMC has assured regulators that the nonprofit Dream Center “will have students’ best interests at heart” and will “not come in as investors whose only concern is a return on their money,” opponents of the deal “are building their case in public that those involved in the deal have plenty at stake in the profit-seeking education industry.” The piece says that the nonprofit’s ties to the for-profit sector and lack of experience running colleges have drawn attention beyond the norm for such deals, and points out that ED and other regulators must sign off on the deal.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23) reports a group of Democrats on Capitol Hill is calling for accreditors to “closely scrutinize” the deal, which would “convert the troubled four-profit schools to non-profit status.” Politico quotes the letter, signed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), and others saying, “we are deeply concerned that EDMC may be attempting to skirt federal accountability rules and protections for taxpayers by converting its institutions to non-profit status while maintaining key elements of four-profit governance.”

Experts: More Progress Needed On Increasing Diversity In STEM Fields.

Diverse Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25) reports that the consensus of experts taking part in a panel discussion at the National Science Foundation in Washington, DC on Thursday was that while there has been progress in improving diversity in STEM fields in recent years, “minorities have come far but they are not there; and only by providing the resources, mentoring, and including everyone will the United States become No. 1 in STEM worldwide.” One panelist, American Indian Science and Education Society President Sarah EchoHawk, “said the United States is not fulfilled its promise years later of providing Native Americans and education in exchange for land.”

From ASEE
Annual Conference Blog
Keep up with the goings-on at the #ASEEAnnual with our daily blog.

VIDEO – 2017 Global Colloquium in the Azores
This event, September 16-18 (in conjunction with the SEFI Annual Conference), links engineering educators across international borders and brings together lecturers, researchers, and corporate colleagues for an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and perspectives.

VIDEO – 2017 ASEE International Forum at the ASEE Annual Conference
A special registration rate of $150 is available to ASEE Annual Conference Registrants.  This short videohas details of the event, on Wednesday of the conference.

Research and Development

CBS’s 60 Minutes Examines Potential And Challenges Of AI.

Under the headline “Artificial Intelligence Positioned To Be A Game-changer,” Charlie Rose examined the rise of Artificial Intelligence and where experts see it heading in segment for CBS’ 60 Minutes Share to
FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25). Among those Rose talked to are the team that created IBM’s Watson along with researchers at Carnegie Mellon and Imperial College.

Oberlin Engineering Students Craft High-Tech Cane For Blind Man.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Marcus, Subscription Publication) profiles Carmen Papalia, a legally blind man who feels socially isolated by the white cane that he and many other visually impaired people use to navigate city streets. The piece describes how Papalia in 2015 sought the help of professor of design Sara Hendren of Oberlin College, a small engineering school in Needham, Massachusetts. Hendren runs the college’s Adaptation and Ability Group, a research lab that integrates art and engineering and seeks to find innovative ways to accommodate the differences of people with disabilities. Hendren, Papalia, and Oberlin students collaborated on a prototype cane with a microphone, speakers, and other features.

Cal Poly Engineers Design Surfboard For California Teen Recovering From Cancer.

KSBY-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter San Luis Obispo, CA (6/22) reports that a team of engineers at Cal Poly have designed a surf board that supports the body of an area teen who is recovering from brain cancer and unable to walk. The engineers partnered with the non-profit organization Jack’s Helping Hand “to build a specific board based on” the teen’s abilities and disabilities.

ExxonMobil Announces Breakthrough In Biofuel Development.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/24, Dlouhy) reported ExxonMobil and scientist J. Craig Venter have developed “a breakthrough that could enable widespread commercialization of algae-based biofuels.” Their technique uses “advanced cell engineering to more than double the fatty lipids inside a strain of algae,” which are used to produce fuel. However, the piece conceded that “commercialization of this kind of modified algae is decades away.”

IBM Partners With AFRL On Advanced Neural-Network Chips Project.

Military Embedded Systems Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23, Daigle) reports IBM is working with the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) on a project aimed at testing the capabilities of the neural-network chips known as TrueNorth. Military Embedded Systems reports the tests will consist combing IBM’s TrueNorth chip with the “left-brain” symbol processing capabilities of conventional computer systems. According to Military Embedded Systems, the “large scale of the system will enable both ‘data parallelism,’ where multiple data sources can be run in parallel against the same neural network, and ‘model parallelism,’ where independent neural networks form an ensemble that can be run in parallel on the same data.”

IBM Plans To Develop A More Accurate Weather Modeling System.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23) reported IBM announced last week that it is partnering with the National Center for Atmospheric Research to “develop a system for modeling weather with unheard of accuracy” to “meet the demands of new technologies like self-driving cars and drone deliveries.” USA Today reports that the system will “predict weather on a scale of individual blocks.”

KSU Polytechnic Campus Receives Permission To Flight UAS At Night.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25) reports the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus said in a news release that its Applied Aviation Research Center has received a waiver from the FAA that will allow them to fly UAS at night. The release said the flight would be used to train students.

Industry News

Demand For AI For Vehicles Could Reach $14 Billion By 2025.

Venture Beat Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/24, Prescher) reported, “A Tractica market intelligence study forecasts that the demand for automotive AI hardware, software, and services will explode from $404 million in 2016 to $14 billion by 2025.” Semi-autonomous and fully autonomous vehicles “must heavily rely on AI systems,” and so we are “seeing significant AI-related investment for self-driving cars from across the design space, with players including Tesla, Google, and Mercedes-Benz. In February 2017, Ford invested $1 billion – Detroit’s biggest investment yet – in the self-driving car startup Argo AI, which was founded by a partnership between two top engineers from Google and Uber.”

Engineering and Public Policy

WSJournal A1: Shale Revolution Boosts US Petrochemical Production.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, A1, Matthews, Subscription Publication) reports on its front page that the US petrochemical industry is seeing the largest amount of investment in a generation: 2016 expenditure on chemical plants alone accounted for half of all capital investment in US manufacturing, up from 20 percent in 2009, according to the Census Bureau. Companies such as Dow Chemical, Exxon Mobil, and Royal Dutch Shell are taking advantage of the cheap byproducts of the oil and gas from shale drilling, seeking to cater to the world’s growing middle class. Industry analysts say global demand for plastics usually grows 1.5 to two times as fast as global GDP, making petrochemicals one of the safer fossil fuel investments. Economists say new investment will make America a major exporter of plastic and contribute to the reduction of its trade deficit. Dow said it plans to export at least 20 percent of its plastics, with a focus on Latin America’s rising population, expanding middle class, and on-the-go lifestyle.

WSJournal Condemns Reinstatement Of Nevada’s Solar Subsidy.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Subscription Publication) editorializes that Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval’s restoration of net metering – which compensates electricity customers at near the retail rate for excess solar power they remit to the grid – is a mistake. Not only does it unfairly shift costs to lower-income customers without rooftop solar panels, but the Journal says the excess generation frequently isn’t needed and can make it more difficult to manage the grid. In fact, net metering tends to benefit the solar rooftop-leasing companies much more than consumers, because the companies install the equipment for free and take all the subsidies. Further, ceasing the subsidy in 2015 didn’t hurt solar growth, as Nevada saw a 71 percent increase in solar energy generation in the past year.

DOE Grid Study Focuses On Reliability, But Ignores Cost-Benefit.

Writing in The Hill, Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Giberson, Hansen) reported that Michael Giberson, professor at Texas Tech University, and Megan Hansen, director of policy at Strata, say that Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s order for a study of electric grid reliability has alarmed industry lobbyists, who are aware that growth in wind and solar energy “over the next decade depends on mandates and subsidies.” They say it is “obvious” that “coal’s loss to wind and solar has been driven by government mandates and subsidies that drive costs higher,” whereas “coal power’s loss to natural gas is mostly market-driven and produces lower electricity prices.” Going forward, they recommend Secretary Perry request a benefit-cost review to evaluate energy policy to determine how federal subsidies for renewables

Lawsuit That Aims To Save 15K Trees In New Jersey From Solar Farm Dismissed By Judge.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23) reports a lawsuit that aims “to block a Six Flags theme park in New Jersey from cutting down nearly 15,000 trees to make way for a solar farm to power the park has been dismissed.” A Superior Court judge ruled last week “that the local governing boards in deciding to approve the project proposed by Six Flags Great Adventure and KDC Solar could weigh the environmental advantage of renewable solar energy against other environmental impacts.”

The Philadelphia Inquirer Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23, Kummer) reports “the New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club, a grassroots environmental organization, was disappointed.” Chapter director Jeff Tittel said, “We believe Six Flags’ plan is flawed given that there are plenty of alternatives they could take that do not harm the environment, sacrifice wildlife habitat, or add to storm-water runoff.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Utah Library System Launches Free Summer STEM Program.

The Deseret (UT) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25) reports the Salt Lake County Library system partnered with Utah State University to launch a series of free summer science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM, camps at different library branches. The article says the initiative reflects a growing nationwide trend in which children “are flocking to programs sponsored by libraries, schools, organizations, businesses and universities that believe the free time of summer, fun activities and a dose of how-it-works learning can combine to keep kids sharp.” The North American Association for Environmental Education, citing a Carnegie Foundation commission report, found that as early as 2007, “the nation’s capacity to innovate and thrive in the modern workforce depends on a foundation of math and science learning. They conclude that a sustained, vibrant democracy is dependent upon this foundation in STEM.” Salt Lake County Library Services early learning program manager Susan Spicer said implementing STEM into other learning areas may improve academic performance in those areas as well.

Also in the News

“International Women In Engineering Day” Promotes Women In STEM Fields.

NBC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/24) reported that “engineers, scientists, students, tech companies and non-profit organizations are just a number of the individuals and groups that celebrated International Women in Engineering Day worldwide for the first time Friday.” NBC News added, “Its widespread effort aims to inspire women to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), ultimately diminishing the gender disparity that exists in those fields.” The article also stated that “while more women have expressed interest in studying the STEM fields over the last 10 years, the number of women in engineering has stayed the same since the early 2000s, according to the Society of Women Engineers,” and moreover “just 18 percent of computer science graduates today are women – less than half of what it was in 1984, according to data from Girls Who Code, a non-profit aimed at advancing women in technology fields.”

Air Force Operationalizing Key Elements In New Cybersecurity Plan.

Defense Systems Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/23, Osborn) reported Air Force leaders said that the service is “now operationalizing several key elements in its comprehensive cybersecurity plan, designed to analyze and mitigate attacks while also building cyber resilience into new weapons systems and platforms early in the acquisition process.” Defense Systems adds that the “implementation is multi-faceted” and includes a wide range of initiatives such as engineering hardware capable of quickly integrating “new patches or security fixes as they emerge,” creating cyber squadrons, and “identifying potential cyber vulnerabilities at the beginning of a weapons or technology development effort.”

Sunday’s Lead Stories

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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 186 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 186 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 186 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Off-tarp emissions, distribution, and efficacy of carbonated fumigants in a low permeability film tarped field Qin, R., Gao, S., Thomas, J.E., Wang, D., Hanson, B.D. 2017 Science of the Total Environment ,
603-604 pp. 1 – 7 .
2 . A full factorial study on the effect of tannins, acidity, and ethanol on the temporal perception of taste and mouthfeel in red wine Frost, S.C., Harbertson, J.F., Heymann, H. 2017 Food Quality and Preference ,
62 pp. 1 – 7 .
3 . A hybrid machine learning model to predict and visualize nitrate concentration throughout the Central Valley aquifer, California, USA Ransom, K.M., Nolan, B.T., A. Traum, J., Faunt, C.C., Bell, A.M., Gronberg, J.A.M., Wheeler, D.C., Z. Rosecrans, C., Jurgens, B., Schwarz, G.E., Belitz, K., M. Eberts, S., Kourakos, G., Harter, T. 2017 Science of the Total Environment ,
601-602 pp. 1160 – 1172 .
4 . Unusual variation of blocking temperature in bi-magnetic nanoparticles Arteaga-Cardona, F., Santillán-Urquiza, E., Pal, U., Méndoza-Álvarez, M.E., Torres-Duarte, C., Cherr, G.N., de la Presa, P., Méndez-Rojas, M.Á. 2017 Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials ,
441 pp. 417 – 423 .
5 . Sonochemical effect of flat sweep frequency and pulsed ultrasound (FSFP) treatment on stability of phenolic acids in a model system Qu, W., Masoud Sehemu, R., Feng, Y., Shi, S., Wang, J., Ma, H., Venkitasamy, C. 2017 Ultrasonics Sonochemistry ,
39 pp. 707 – 715 .
6 . Adsorption and desorption of cationic malachite green dye on cellulose nanofibril aerogels Jiang, F., Dinh, D.M., Hsieh, Y.-L. 2017 Carbohydrate Polymers ,
173 pp. 286 – 294 .
7 . Analytical and experimental evaluation of flexural behavior of FRP pultruded composite profiles for bridge deck structural design Xin, H., Mosallam, A., Liu, Y., Wang, C., Zhang, Y. 2017 Construction and Building Materials ,
150 pp. 123 – 149 .
8 . Performance comparison of 10 different classification techniques in segmenting white matter hyperintensities in aging Dadar, M., Maranzano, J., Misquitta, K., Anor, C.J., Fonov, V.S., Tartaglia, M.C., Carmichael, O.T., Decarli, C., Collins, D.L. 2017 NeuroImage ,
157 pp. 233 – 249 .
9 . Measurement of the differential inclusive B<sup>+</sup> hadron cross sections in pp collisions at s=13 TeV Khachatryan, V., Sirunyan, A.M., Tumasyan, A., Adam, W., Asilar, E., Bergauer, T., Brandstetter, J., Brondolin, E., Dragicevic, M., Erö, J., Flechl, M., Friedl, M., Frühwirth, R., Ghete, V.M., Hartl, C., Hörmann, N., Hrubec, J., Jeitler, M., König, A., Krätschmer, I., Liko, D., Matsushita, T., Mikulec, I., Rabady, D., Rad, N., Rahbaran, B., Rohringer, H., Schieck, J., Strauss, J., Treberer-Treberspurg, W., Waltenberger, W., Wulz, C.-E., Mossolov, V., Shumeiko, N., Suarez Gonzalez, J., Alderweireldt, S., De Wolf, E.A., Janssen, X., Lauwers, J., Van De Klundert, M., Van Haevermaet, H., Van Mechelen, P., Van Remortel, N., Van Spilbeeck, A., Abu Zeid, S., Blekman, F., D’Hondt, J., Daci, N., De Bruyn, I., Deroover, K., Heracleous, N., Lowette, S., Moortgat, S., Moreels, L., Olbrechts, A., Python, Q., Tavernier, S., Van Doninck, W., Van Mulders, P., Van Parijs, I., Brun, H., Caillol, C., Clerbaux, B., De Lentdecker, G., Delannoy, H., Fasanella, G., Favart, L., Goldouzian, R., Grebenyuk, A., Karapostoli, G., Lenzi, T., Léonard, A., Luetic, J., Maerschalk, T., Marinov, A., Randle-conde, A., Seva, T., Vander Velde, C., Vanlaer, P., Yonamine, R., Zenoni, F., Zhang, F., Cimmino, A., Cornelis, T., Dobur, D., Fagot, A., Garcia, G., Gul, M., Poyraz, D., Salva, S., Schöfbeck, R., Sharma, A., Tytgat, M., Van Driessche, W., Yazgan, E., Zaganidis, N., Bakhshiansohi, H., Beluffi, C., Bondu, O., Brochet, S., Bruno, G., Caudron, A., De Visscher, S., Delaere, C., Delcourt, M., Francois, B., Giammanco, A., Jafari, A., Jez, P., Komm, M., Lemaitre, V., Magitteri, A., Mertens, A., Musich, M., Nuttens, C., Piotrzkowski, K., Quertenmont, L., Selvaggi, M., Vidal Marono, M., Wertz, S., Beliy, N., Aldá Júnior, W.L., Alves, F.L., Alves, G.A., Brito, L., Hensel, C., Moraes, A., Pol, M.E., Rebello Teles, P., Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E., Carvalho, W., Chinellato, J., Custódio, A., Da Costa, E.M., Da Silveira, G.G., De Jesus Damiao, D., De Oliveira Martins, C., Fonseca De Souza, S., Huertas Guativa, L.M., Malbouisson, H., Matos Figueiredo, D., Mora Herrera, C., Mundim, L., Nogima, H., Prado Da Silva, W.L., Santoro, A., Sznajder, A., Tonelli Manganote, E.J., Vilela Pereira, A., Ahuja, S., Dogra, S., Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.R., Moon, C.S., Novaes, S.F., Padula, S.S., Bernardes, C.A., Gregores, E.M., Mercadante, P.G., Romero Abad, D., Ruiz Vargas, J.C., Aleksandrov, A., Hadjiiska, R., Iaydjiev, P., Rodozov, M., Stoykova, S., Sultanov, G., Vutova, M., Dimitrov, A., Glushkov, I., Litov, L., Pavlov, B., Petkov, P., Fang, W., Ahmad, M., Bian, J.G., Chen, G.M., Chen, H.S., Chen, M., Chen, Y., Cheng, T., Jiang, C.H., Leggat, D., Liu, Z., Romeo, F., Shaheen, S.M., Spiezia, A., Tao, J., Wang, C., Wang, Z., Zhang, H., Zhao, J., Ban, Y., Chen, G., Li, Q., Liu, S., Mao, Y., Qian, S.J., Wang, D., Xu, Z., Avila, C., Cabrera, A., Chaparro Sierra, L.F., Florez, C., Gomez, J.P., González Hernández, C.F., Ruiz Alvarez, J.D., Sanabria, J.C., Godinovic, N., Lelas, D., Puljak, I., Ribeiro Cipriano, P.M., Sculac, T., Antunovic, Z., Kovac, M., Brigljevic, V., Ferencek, D., Kadija, K., Micanovic, S., Sudic, L., Susa, T., Attikis, A., Mavromanolakis, G., Mousa, J., Nicolaou, C., Ptochos, F., Razis, P.A., Rykaczewski, H., Finger, M., Finger, M., Carrera Jarrin, E., Ellithi Kamel, A., Mahmoud, M.A., Radi, A., Calpas, B., Kadastik, M., Murumaa, M., Perrini, L., Raidal, M., Tiko, A., Veelken, C., Eerola, P., Pekkanen, J., Voutilainen, M., Härkönen, J., Karimäki, V., Kinnunen, R., Lampén, T., Lassila-Perini, K., Lehti, S., Lindén, T., Luukka, P., Tuominiemi, J., Tuovinen, E., Wendland, L., Talvitie, J., Tuuva, T., Besancon, M., Couderc, F., Dejardin, M., Denegri, D., Fabbro, B., Faure, J.L., Favaro, C., Ferri, F., Ganjour, S., Ghosh, S., Givernaud, A., Gras, P., Hamel de Monchenault, G., Jarry, P., Kucher, I., Locci, E., Machet, M., Malcles, J., Rander, J., Rosowsky, A., Titov, M., Zghiche, A., Abdulsalam, A., Antropov, I., Baffioni, S., Beaudette, F., Busson, P., Cadamuro, L., Chapon, E., Charlot, C., Davignon, O., Granier de Cassagnac, R., Jo, M., Lisniak, S., Miné, P., Nguyen, M., Ochando, C., Ortona, G., Paganini, P., Pigard, P., Regnard, S., Salerno, R., Sirois, Y., Strebler, T., Yilmaz, Y., Zabi, A., Agram, J.-L., Andrea, J., Aubin, A., Bloch, D., Brom, J.-M., Buttignol, M., Chabert, E.C., Chanon, N., Collard, C., Conte, E., Coubez, X., Fontaine, J.-C., Gelé, D., Goerlach, U., Le Bihan, A.-C., Skovpen, K., Van Hove, P., Gadrat, S., Beauceron, S., Bernet, C., Boudoul, G., Bouvier, E., Carrillo Montoya, C.A., Chierici, R., Contardo, D., Courbon, B., Depasse, P., El Mamouni, H., Fan, J., Fay, J., Gascon, S., Gouzevitch, M., Grenier, G., Ille, B., Lagarde, F., Laktineh, I.B., Lethuillier, M., Mirabito, L., Pequegnot, A.L., Perries, S., Popov, A., Sabes, D., Sordini, V., Vander Donckt, M., Verdier, P., Viret, S., Toriashvili, T., Tsamalaidze, Z., Autermann, C., Beranek, S., Feld, L., Heister, A., Kiesel, M.K., Klein, K., Lipinski, M., Ostapchuk, A., Preuten, M., Raupach, F., Schael, S., Schomakers, C., Schulte, J.F., Schulz, J., Verlage, T., Weber, H., Zhukov, V., Albert, A., Brodski, M., Dietz-Laursonn, E., Duchardt, D., Endres, M., Erdmann, M., Erdweg, S., Esch, T., Fischer, R., Güth, A., Hamer, M., Hebbeker, T., Heidemann, C., Hoepfner, K., Knutzen, S., Merschmeyer, M., Meyer, A., Millet, P., Mukherjee, S., Olschewski, M., Padeken, K., Pook, T., Radziej, M., Reithler, H., Rieger, M., Scheuch, F., Sonnenschein, L., Teyssier, D., Thüer, S., Cherepanov, V., Flügge, G., Haj Ahmad, W., Hoehle, F., Kargoll, B., Kress, T., Künsken, A., Lingemann, J., Müller, T., Nehrkorn, A., Nowack, A., Nugent, I.M., Pistone, C., Pooth, O., Stahl, A., Aldaya Martin, M., Asawatangtrakuldee, C., Beernaert, K., Behnke, O., Behrens, U., Bin Anuar, A.A., Borras, K., Campbell, A., Connor, P., Contreras-Campana, C., Costanza, F., Diez Pardos, C., Dolinska, G., Eckerlin, G., Eckstein, D., Eren, E., Gallo, E., Garay Garcia, J., Geiser, A., Gizhko, A., Grados Luyando, J.M., Gunnellini, P., Harb, A., Hauk, J., Hempel, M., Jung, H., Kalogeropoulos, A., Karacheban, O., Kasemann, M., Keaveney, J., Kleinwort, C., Korol, I., Krücker, D., Lange, W., Lelek, A., Leonard, J., Lipka, K., Lobanov, A., Lohmann, W., Mankel, R., Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A., Meyer, A.B., Mittag, G., Mnich, J., Mussgiller, A., Ntomari, E., Pitzl, D., Placakyte, R., Raspereza, A., Roland, B., Sahin, M.Ö., Saxena, P., Schoerner-Sadenius, T., Seitz, C., Spannagel, S., Stefaniuk, N., Van Onsem, G.P., Walsh, R., Wissing, C., Blobel, V., Centis Vignali, M., Draeger, A.R., Dreyer, T., Garutti, E., Gonzalez, D., Haller, J., Hoffmann, M., Junkes, A., Klanner, R., Kogler, R., Kovalchuk, N., Lapsien, T., Lenz, T., Marchesini, I., Marconi, D., Meyer, M., Niedziela, M., Nowatschin, D., Pantaleo, F., Peiffer, T., Perieanu, A., Poehlsen, J., Sander, C., Scharf, C., Schleper, P., Schmidt, A., Schumann, S., Schwandt, J., Stadie, H., Steinbrück, G., Stober, F.M., Stöver, M., Tholen, H., Troendle, D., Usai, E., Vanelderen, L., Vanhoefer, A., Vormwald, B., Barth, C., Baus, C., Berger, J., Butz, E., Chwalek, T., Colombo, F., De Boer, W., Dierlamm, A., Fink, S., Friese, R., Giffels, M., Gilbert, A., Goldenzweig, P., Haitz, D., Hartmann, F., Heindl, S.M., Husemann, U., Katkov, I., Lobelle Pardo, P., Maier, B., Mildner, H., Mozer, M.U., Müller, T., Plagge, M., Quast, G., Rabbertz, K., Röcker, S., Roscher, F., Schröder, M., Shvetsov, I., Sieber, G., Simonis, H.J., Ulrich, R., Wagner-Kuhr, J., Wayand, S., Weber, M., Weiler, T., Williamson, S., Wöhrmann, C., Wolf, R., Anagnostou, G., Daskalakis, G., Geralis, T., Giakoumopoulou, V.A., Kyriakis, A., Loukas, D., Topsis-Giotis, I., Kesisoglou, S., Panagiotou, A., Saoulidou, N., Tziaferi, E., Evangelou, I., Flouris, G., Foudas, C., Kokkas, P., Loukas, N., Manthos, N., Papadopoulos, I., Paradas, E., Filipovic, N., Bencze, G., Hajdu, C., Hidas, P., Horvath, D., Sikler, F., Veszpremi, V., Vesztergombi, G., Zsigmond, A.J., Beni, N., Czellar, S., Karancsi, J., Makovec, A., Molnar, J., Szillasi, Z., Bartók, M., Raics, P., Trocsanyi, Z.L., Ujvari, B., Bahinipati, S., Choudhury, S., Mal, P., Mandal, K., Nayak, A., Sahoo, D.K., Sahoo, N., Swain, S.K., Bansal, S., Beri, S.B., Bhatnagar, V., Chawla, R., Bhawandeep, U., Kalsi, A.K., Kaur, A., Kaur, M., Kumar, R., Kumari, P., Mehta, A., Mittal, M., Singh, J.B., Walia, G., Kumar, A., Bhardwaj, A., Choudhary, B.C., Garg, R.B., Keshri, S., Malhotra, S., Naimuddin, M., Nishu, N., Ranjan, K., Sharma, R., Sharma, V., Bhattacharya, R., Bhattacharya, S., Chatterjee, K., Dey, S., Dutt, S., Dutta, S., Ghosh, S., Majumdar, N., Modak, A., Mondal, K., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nandan, S., Purohit, A., Roy, A., Roy, D., Roy Chowdhury, S., Sarkar, S., Sharan, M., Thakur, S., Behera, P.K., Chudasama, R., Dutta, D., Jha, V., Kumar, V., Mohanty, A.K., Netrakanti, P.K., Pant, L.M., Shukla, P., Topkar, A., Aziz, T., Dugad, S., Kole, G., Mahakud, B., Mitra, S., Mohanty, G.B., Parida, B., Sur, N., Sutar, B., Banerjee, S., Bhowmik, S., Dewanjee, R.K., Ganguly, S., Guchait, M., Jain, S., Kumar, S., Maity, M., Majumder, G., Mazumdar, K., Sarkar, T., Wickramage, N., Chauhan, S., Dube, S., Hegde, V., Kapoor, A., Kothekar, K., Rane, A., Sharma, S., Behnamian, H., Chenarani, S., Eskandari Tadavani, E., Etesami, S.M., Fahim, A., Khakzad, M., Mohammadi Najafabadi, M., Naseri, M., Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S., Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F., Safarzadeh, B., Zeinali, M., Felcini, M., Grunewald, M., Abbrescia, M., Calabria, C., Caputo, C., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., Cristella, L., De Filippis, N., De Palma, M., Fiore, L., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Miniello, G., My, S., Nuzzo, S., Pompili, A., Pugliese, G., Radogna, R., Ranieri, A., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Venditti, R., Verwilligen, P., Abbrescia, M., Calabria, C., Caputo, C., Cristella, L., De Palma, M., Miniello, G., My, S., Nuzzo, S., Pompili, A., Radogna, R., Selvaggi, G., Venditti, R., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Pugliese, G., Abbiendi, G., Bonacorsi, D., Braibant-Giacomelli, S., Brigliadori, L., Campanini, R., Capiluppi, P., Castro, A., Cavallo, F.R., Chhibra, S.S., Codispoti, G., Cuffiani, M., Dallavalle, G.M., Fabbri, F., Fanfani, A., Fasanella, D., Giacomelli, P., Grandi, C., Guiducci, L., Marcellini, S., Masetti, G., Montanari, A., Navarria, F.L., Perrotta, A., Rossi, A.M., Rovelli, T., Siroli, G.P., Tosi, N., Bonacorsi, D., Braibant-Giacomelli, S., Brigliadori, L., Campanini, R., Capiluppi, P., Castro, A., Chhibra, S.S., Codispoti, G., Cuffiani, M., Fanfani, A., Fasanella, D., Guiducci, L., Navarria, F.L., Rossi, A.M., Rovelli, T., Siroli, G.P., Tosi, N., Battilana, C., Albergo, S., Chiorboli, M., Costa, S., Di Mattia, A., Giordano, F., Potenza, R., Tricomi, A., Tuve, C., Albergo, S., Chiorboli, M., Costa, S., Giordano, F., Potenza, R., Tricomi, A., Tuve, C., Barbagli, G., Ciulli, V., Civinini, C., D’Alessandro, R., Focardi, E., Gori, V., Lenzi, P., Meschini, M., Paoletti, S., Sguazzoni, G., Viliani, L., Ciulli, V., D’Alessandro, R., Focardi, E., Gori, V., Lenzi, P., Viliani, L., Benussi, L., Bianco, S., Fabbri, F., Piccolo, D., Primavera, F., Calvelli, V., Ferro, F., Lo Vetere, M., Monge, M.R., Robutti, E., Tosi, S., Calvelli, V., Lo Vetere, M., Monge, M.R., Tosi, S., Dinardo, M.E., Dini, P., Fiorendi, S., Gennai, S., Ghezzi, A., Govoni, P., Malvezzi, S., Manzoni, R.A., Marzocchi, B., Menasce, D., Moroni, L., Paganoni, M., Ragazzi, S., Tabarelli de Fatis, T., Dinardo, M.E., Fiorendi, S., Ghezzi, A., Govoni, P., Manzoni, R.A., Marzocchi, B., Paganoni, M., Ragazzi, S., Tabarelli de Fatis, T., Brianza, L., Malberti, M., Pigazzini, S., Buontempo, S., Cavallo, N., Di Guida, S., Esposito, M., Fabozzi, F., Iorio, A.O.M., Lanza, G., Lista, L., Meola, S., Paolucci, P., Sciacca, C., Esposito, M., Iorio, A.O.M., Sciacca, C., Cavallo, N., Fabozzi, F., Di Guida, S., Meola, S., De Nardo, G., Thyssen, F., Azzi, P., Bacchetta, N., Benato, L., Bisello, D., Boletti, A., Carlin, R., Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A., Dall’Osso, M., De Castro Manzano, P., Dorigo, T., Dosselli, U., Gozzelino, A., Lacaprara, S., Margoni, M., Meneguzzo, A.T., Montecassiano, F., Passaseo, M., Pazzini, J., Pozzobon, N., Ronchese, P., Simonetto, F., Torassa, E., Ventura, S., Zotto, P., Zucchetta, A., Zumerle, G., Benato, L., Bisello, D., Boletti, A., Carlin, R., Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A., Dall’Osso, M., Margoni, M., Meneguzzo, A.T., Pazzini, J., Pozzobon, N., Ronchese, P., Simonetto, F., Zotto, P., Zucchetta, A., Zumerle, G., Braghieri, A., Magnani, A., Montagna, P., Ratti, S.P., Re, V., Riccardi, C., Salvini, P., Vai, I., Vitulo, P., Magnani, A., Montagna, P., Ratti, S.P., Riccardi, C., Vai, I., Vitulo, P., Alunni Solestizi, L., Bilei, G.M., Ciangottini, D., Fanò, L., Lariccia, P., Leonardi, R., Mantovani, G., Menichelli, M., Saha, A., Santocchia, A., Alunni Solestizi, L., Ciangottini, D., Fanò, L., Lariccia, P., Leonardi, R., Mantovani, G., Santocchia, A., Androsov, K., Azzurri, P., Bagliesi, G., Bernardini, J., Boccali, T., Castaldi, R., Ciocci, M.A., Dell’Orso, R., Donato, S., Giassi, A., Grippo, M.T., Ligabue, F., Lomtadze, T., Martini, L., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Rizzi, A., Savoy-Navarro, A., Spagnolo, P., Tenchini, R., Tonelli, G., Venturi, A., Verdini, P.G., Martini, L., Messineo, A., Rizzi, A., Tonelli, G., Donato, S., Ligabue, F., Fedi, G., Barone, L., Cavallari, F., Cipriani, M., D’imperio, G., Del Re, D., Diemoz, M., Gelli, S., Longo, E., Margaroli, F., Meridiani, P., Organtini, G., Paramatti, R., Preiato, F., Rahatlou, S., Rovelli, C., Santanastasio, F., Barone, L., Cipriani, M., D’imperio, G., Del Re, D., Gelli, S., Longo, E., Margaroli, F., Organtini, G., Preiato, F., Rahatlou, S., Santanastasio, F., Amapane, N., Arcidiacono, R., Argiro, S., Arneodo, M., Bartosik, N., Bellan, R., Biino, C., Cartiglia, N., Costa, M., Covarelli, R., De 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Woodard, A., Alimena, J., Antonelli, L., Brinson, J., Bylsma, B., Durkin, L.S., Flowers, S., Francis, B., Hart, A., Hill, C., Hughes, R., Ji, W., Liu, B., Luo, W., Puigh, D., Winer, B.L., Wulsin, H.W., Cooperstein, S., Driga, O., Elmer, P., Hardenbrook, J., Hebda, P., Lange, D., Luo, J., Marlow, D., Medvedeva, T., Mei, K., Mooney, M., Olsen, J., Palmer, C., Piroué, P., Stickland, D., Tully, C., Zuranski, A., Malik, S., Barker, A., Barnes, V.E., Folgueras, S., Gutay, L., Jha, M.K., Jones, M., Jung, A.W., Jung, K., Miller, D.H., Neumeister, N., Shi, X., Sun, J., Svyatkovskiy, A., Wang, F., Xie, W., Xu, L., Parashar, N., Stupak, J., Adair, A., Akgun, B., Chen, Z., Ecklund, K.M., Geurts, F.J.M., Guilbaud, M., Li, W., Michlin, B., Northup, M., Padley, B.P., Redjimi, R., Roberts, J., Rorie, J., Tu, Z., Zabel, J., Betchart, B., Bodek, A., de Barbaro, P., Demina, R., Duh, Y.T., Ferbel, T., Galanti, M., Garcia-Bellido, A., Han, J., Hindrichs, O., Khukhunaishvili, A., Lo, K.H., Tan, P., Verzetti, M., Agapitos, A., Chou, J.P., Contreras-Campana, E., Gershtein, Y., Gómez Espinosa, T.A., Halkiadakis, E., Heindl, M., Hidas, D., Hughes, E., Kaplan, S., Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R., Kyriacou, S., Lath, A., Nash, K., Saka, H., Salur, S., Schnetzer, S., Sheffield, D., Somalwar, S., Stone, R., Thomas, S., Thomassen, P., Walker, M., Foerster, M., Heideman, J., Riley, G., Rose, K., Spanier, S., Thapa, K., Bouhali, O., Celik, A., Dalchenko, M., De Mattia, M., Delgado, A., Dildick, S., Eusebi, R., Gilmore, J., Huang, T., Juska, E., Kamon, T., Mueller, R., Pakhotin, Y., Patel, R., Perloff, A., Perniè, L., Rathjens, D., Rose, A., Safonov, A., Tatarinov, A., Ulmer, K.A., Akchurin, N., Cowden, C., Damgov, J., De Guio, F., Dragoiu, C., Dudero, P.R., Faulkner, J., Kunori, S., Lamichhane, K., Lee, S.W., Libeiro, T., Peltola, T., Undleeb, S., Volobouev, I., Wang, Z., Delannoy, A.G., Greene, S., Gurrola, A., Janjam, R., Johns, W., Maguire, C., Melo, A., Ni, H., Sheldon, P., Tuo, S., Velkovska, J., Xu, Q., Arenton, M.W., Barria, P., Cox, B., Goodell, J., Hirosky, R., Ledovskoy, A., Li, H., Neu, C., Sinthuprasith, T., Sun, X., Wang, Y., Wolfe, E., Xia, F., Clarke, C., Harr, R., Karchin, P.E., Lamichhane, P., Sturdy, J., Belknap, D.A., Dasu, S., Dodd, L., Duric, S., Gomber, B., Grothe, M., Herndon, M., Hervé, A., Klabbers, P., Lanaro, A., Levine, A., Long, K., Loveless, R., Ojalvo, I., Perry, T., Polese, G., Ruggles, T., Savin, A., Smith, N., Smith, W.H., Taylor, D., Woods, N., Frühwirth, R., Zhang, F., Beluffi, C., Chinellato, J., Da Silveira, G.G., Chen, Y., Finger, M., Ellithi Kamel, A., Mahmoud, M.A., Mahmoud, M.A., Radi, A., Agram, J.-L., Popov, A., Toriashvili, T., Stahl, A., Borras, K., Gallo, E., Hempel, M., Horvath, D., Vesztergombi, G., Karancsi, J., Choudhury, S., Nayak, A., Bhowmik, S., Wickramage, N., Chenarani, S., Fahim, A., Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S., Safarzadeh, B., Androsov, K., Savoy-Navarro, A., Md Ali, M.A.B., Mohamad Idris, F., Heredia-De La Cruz, I., Byszuk, A., Matveev, V., Matveev, V., Kim, V., Kuznetsova, E., Chadeeva, M., Dubinin, M., Blinov, V., Adzic, P., Di Marco, E., Rolandi, G., Sphicas, P., Veckalns, V., Lecomte, P., Starodumov, A., Amsler, C., Cerci, S., Kangal, E.E., Onengut, G., Ozdemir, K., Topakli, H., Isildak, B., Karapinar, G., Kaya, M., Kaya, O., Yetkin, E.A., Yetkin, T., Sen, S., Newbold, D.M., Belyaev, A., Vazquez Acosta, M., Wasserbaech, S., Milenovic, P., Colafranceschi, S., Bilki, B., Mermerkaya, H., Ozok, F., Bouhali, O., Kamon, T. 2017 Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics ,
771 pp. 435 – 456 .
10 . Planning and Executing the Neurosurgery Boot Camp: The Bolivia Experience Ament, J.D., Kim, T., Gold-Markel, J., Germano, I.M., Dempsey, R., Weaver, J.P., DiPatri, A.J., Andrews, R.J., Sanchez, M., Hinojosa, J., Moser, R.P., Glick, R. 2017 World Neurosurgery ,
104 pp. 407 – 410 .
11 . Effects of short-term fasting on stress physiology, body condition, and locomotor activity in wintering male white-crowned sparrows Krause, J.S., Pérez, J.H., Meddle, S.L., Wingfield, J.C. 2017 Physiology and Behavior ,
177 pp. 282 – 290 .
12 . Deterministic simulation of mildly intermittent hydrologic records Maskey, M.L., Puente, C.E., Sivakumar, B., Cortis, A. 2017 Journal of Hydrologic Engineering ,
22 ( 8 ) , art. no. 04017026
13 . Internal mechanisms underlying anticipatory language processing: Evidence from event-related-potentials and neural oscillations Li, X., Zhang, Y., Xia, J., Swaab, T.Y. 2017 Neuropsychologia ,
102 pp. 70 – 81 .
14 . Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field Portes, A., Guarnizo, L.E., Landolt, P. 2017 Ethnic and Racial Studies ,
40 ( 9 ) pp. 1486 – 1491 .
15 . Targeting IκBNS in allergic asthma: where it resides, matters Sengupta, S., Haczku, A. 2017 Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology ,
72 ( 7 ) pp. 1003 – 1005 .
16 . Rapid throughput analysis of GABAA receptor subtype modulators and blockers using DiSBAC1(3) membrane potential red dye Nik, A.M., Pressly, B., Singh, V., Antrobus, S., Hulsizer, S., Rogawski, M.A., Wulff, H., Pessah, I.N. 2017 Molecular Pharmacology ,
92 ( 1 ) pp. 88 – 99 .
17 . Increased mud deposition reduces stromatolite complexity Mackey, T.J., Sumner, D.Y., Hawes, I., Jungblut, A.D., Lawrence, J., Leidman, S., Allen, B. 2017 Geology ,
45 ( 7 ) pp. 663 – 666 .
18 . Pay-off-biased social learning underlies the diffusion of novel extractive foraging traditions in a wild primate Barrett, B.J., McElreath, R.L., Perry, S.E. 2017 Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences ,
284 ( 1856 ) , art. no. 20170358
19 . Pubertal development in girls by breast cancer family history: The LEGACY girls cohort Terry, M.B., Keegan, T.H.M., Houghton, L.C., Goldberg, M., Andrulis, I.L., Daly, M.B., Buys, S.S., Wei, Y., Whittemore, A.S., Protacio, A., Bradbury, A.R., Chung, W.K., Knight, J.A., John, E.M. 2017 Breast Cancer Research ,
19 ( 1 ) , art. no. 69
20 . Nitrogen and plant population change radiation capture and utilization capacity of sunflower in semi-arid environment Awais, M., Wajid, A., Bashir, M.U., Habib-ur-Rahman, M., Raza, M.A.S., Ahmad, A., Saleem, M.F., Hammad, H.M., Mubeen, M., Saeed, U., Arshad, M.N., Fahad, S., Nasim, W. 2017 Environmental Science and Pollution Research ,
pp. 1 – 15 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
21 . International trade of GMO-related agricultural products Xanat, V.M., Jiang, K., Barnett, G.A., Park, H.W. 2017 Quality and Quantity ,
pp. 1 – 23 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
22 . Navigating Past a Fork in the Road: Carbocation-π Interactions Can Manipulate Dynamic Behavior of Reactions Facing Post-Transition-State Bifurcations Hare, S.R., Pemberton, R.P., Tantillo, D.J. 2017 Journal of the American Chemical Society ,
139 ( 22 ) pp. 7485 – 7493 .
23 . The Stability of Self-Reported Anxiety in Youth with Autism Versus ADHD or Typical Development Schiltz, H., McIntyre, N., Swain-Lerro, L., Zajic, M., Mundy, P. 2017 Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders ,
pp. 1 – 9 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
24 . Mechanism of the fcc-to-hcp phase transformation in solid Ar Li, B., Qian, G., Oganov, A.R., Boulfelfel, S.E., Faller, R. 2017 Journal of Chemical Physics ,
146 ( 21 ) , art. no. 214502
25 . Modeling the spatio-temporal dynamics of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome cases at farm level using geographical distance and pig trade network matrices Amirpour Haredasht, S., Polson, D., Main, R., Lee, K., Holtkamp, D., Martínez-López, B. 2017 BMC Veterinary Research ,
13 ( 1 ) , art. no. 163
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 The Association of American Publishers welcomes judgment against ‘Sci-Hub’ pirate site
The Association of American Publishers (AAP) welcomes the June 21, 2017 ruling of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York regarding the wilful infringement of scores of scholarly articles protected by copyright law. Ruling in favour of Elsevier, the publisher that brought the action, the Court entered a default judgment against Sci-Hub, the Library Genesis Project, and a number of related sites, and against the defendant operator.
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 Collaboration essential for the future of the academic book, reveals Academic Book of the Future report
Two major new reports demonstrate that the future of the academic book is at a crossroads with the number of new book proposals growing rapidly but sales per title continuing to fall. Researchers on the Academic Book of the Future project are recommending that academics and publishers work together to develop a new vision for the sector that embraces technology and focuses on enhancing the readers experience.
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 Four Thomson Reuters solutions named finalists for SIIA CODiE Awards
Thomson Reuters has announced that four of its products are finalists for the 2017 SIIA CODiE Awards. The awards offer 93 categories that are organised by industry focus on business and education technology. Thomson Reuters solutions were among 205 finalists across the 59 business technology categories.
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 Syndetics Unbound integrated with Primo and Summon
ProQuest and Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, are helping libraries improve the research experience and expand exploration by integrating ProQuest® Syndetics Unbound with the Ex Libris Primo® and Summon® discovery services. The integration with ProQuest® Syndetics Unbound, a groundbreaking online enrichment service, enables libraries to create a better discovery experience for today’s researcher while maximising the value of their collections.
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 The American Society of Plant Biologists’ flagship journals now live on HighWire Press’s JCore platform
The American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) has announced that its two flagship journals, The Plant Celland Plant Physiology, are now live on HighWire’s JCore platform. The Society will demonstrate the new sites at their upcoming Plant Biology 2017 annual meeting in Hawaii, which starts this June 24.
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 Michael Thoennessen appointed new APS Editor-in-Chief
Nuclear physicist Michael Thoennessen has been selected to become APS Editor in Chief at the end of August 2017. Currently an Associate Director of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) in Lansing, Michigan, and University Distinguished Professor of Physics at MSU, he was appointed following a vote of the APS Board of Directors on June 16.
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 Figshare and ASHA partner to enhance discoverability and reuse of research outputs
Figshare, an online digital repository for academic research, has announced a new partnership with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to showcase supplementary research outputs within the communication sciences and disorders discipline. Research outputs published across ASHA’s peer-reviewed scholarly journals will be aggregated under one portal. The new customised Figshare portal is available at asha.figshare.com.
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 SAGE Publishing and EBSCO extend partnership to expand distribution of SAGE’s journals portfolio
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has announced an expanded partnership with EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) to broaden the availability of SAGE’s journals portfolio to North American public, corporate, medical, and other special libraries. With this partnership, EBSCO will begin selling SAGE’s journal packages and collections, which are housed on the recently re-launched SAGE Journals platform.
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 ProQuest solutions help libraries reclaim space
Over 80% of U.S. librarians have deemed space reclamation a priority or stated that it will be in the near future, according to research conducted by ProQuest. In response, ProQuest is combining content solutions with digitisation, assessment and discovery services to help libraries transform spaces and bring more value to their users.
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 BMJ updates Ebola resources to support healthcare workers in Central and West Africa
Healthcare knowledge provider BMJ has updated Ebola resources to support healthcare workers in Central and West Africa. Following the recent Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, BMJ has updated its range of free online resources to support healthcare workers in the region – as well as for health professionals outside affected regions who want to learn more about the virus and how to spot it.
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 Emerald unveils new challenger Case Study product
Academic publisher Emerald Publishing has launched Emerald eCase Collection, a new challenger case studies product designed to improve the business school learning experience. eCase Collection provides institutions with unlimited access to a growing digital library of over 1,500 real life business situation case studies from a range of leading business schools and contributing partners.
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 Cambridge University Press and the Royal College of Psychiatrists announce new publishing partnership
The Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych) and Cambridge University Press have announced the formation of a new publishing partnership beginning in January 2018. The College’s books and journals in the RCPsych portfolio will join Cambridge’s impressive psychiatry publishing programme.
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 European Hematology Association launches new journal – HemaSphere
The European Hematology Association, a Europe-based association of hematologists, has launched its new journal HemaSphere with publisher Wolters Kluwer at the 22nd Annual Congress of EHA in Madrid.HemaSphere will be under the editorial leadership of Co-Editors-in-Chief, Dr Andreas Engert of University of Cologne and Dr Jan Cools of KU Leuven.
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 ACCUCOMS to represent the Company of Biologists in India, South-East Asia and Taiwan
ACCUCOMS, an independent provider of services to academic and professional publishers, has announced that the Company of Biologists has signed a representation Agreement with ACCUCOMS to bring their journals to the Indian, South-East Asian and Taiwanese market. ACCUCOMS is a worldwide provider of sales and marketing services to academic and professional publishers since 2004.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Airbus To Introduce Deployable Flight Recorders Built By L3, Leonardo.

Financial and aerospace industry news outlets reported on Wednesday that Airbus has announced that it will begin incorporating deployable flight recorders into its long-range A350 airliners beginning in 2019. Reports note that the ejectable devices are built by L3 Technologies. According to Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Bryan), Airbus said in Paris yesterday that the Automatic Deployable Flight Recorders will be able to float in the event of a crash at sea and are capable of recording up to 25 hours of voice data from the cockpit. “Recommended by investigators after an Air France A330 jet crashed in 2009, the idea came to the fore after the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 in March 2014, for which the recorders still have not been found,” Reuters reports. “However,” adds Reuters, “some in the industry have expressed doubts over ejectable black boxes, saying they could deploy accidentally, while others have said they would prefer live streaming of data.”

CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Reid) reports that the ADFRs, which were co-developed with DRS Leonardo, will eventually “be fitted onto longer range Airbus planes from the A320 series right up to the A380.” Charles Champion, executive vice president of engineering at Airbus Commercial Aircraft, is quoted saying at a press release on Wednesday that the device “will release itself automatically if submerged in two meters of water or if the planes sensors detect serious structural deformation.” He added: “The structural damage would have to be serious. We want to ensure no deployment on a hard landing or a bird strike.” FlightGlobal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Kaminski-morrow), meanwhile, reports that Champion said that real-time data transmission “will come eventually,” but that Airbus is currently focused on implementing a “hard solution” in the releasable recorders. Aviation International News Share to FacebookShare to
Twitter (6/21, Polek) reports that the ADFRs will come “with integrated 90-day Underwater Locator Beacon to help rescue teams rapidly locate and recover flight recorders.”

Airbus also plans to introduce “lighter and more compact fixed cockpit voice data recorders” in both its long- and short-range aircraft, Aviation Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Massy-Beresford) reports. The smaller recorders will also capture up to 25 hours of voice and flight data, “in line with new European Aviation Safety Agency and International Civil Aviation Organization requirements that require an increase from the current 2 hours of voice recording.”

Higher Education

University Of Michigan To Offer Driverless Shuttle Service.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Snavely) reports the University of Michigan, starting this fall, will begin offering driverless shuttle service on campus, which “will use two fully-automated, 15-passenger, all-electric shuttles manufactured by French firm Navya to transport students, faculty, and staff between U-M’s engineering campus and the university’s North Campus Research Complex.” Called Arma, the piece says the shuttle has been under testing by MCITY, “U-M’s public-private partnership for mobility research,” since December.

Mcity researcher and director, Huei Peng, said in a statement, “the first-ever automated shuttle service on a campus is a critical research project that will help us understand the challenge and opportunities presented by this type of mobility service and how people interact with it,” the Detroit News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) reports. The piece says the “shuttle program will study how passengers and those on the street react to the vehicle as a way to gauge consumer acceptance.”

Additional coverage is provided by Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Abuelsamid).

CFPB Report Faults FedLoan Servicing For Mishandling Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/22, Douglas-Gabriel) reports the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau released a report on Thursday saying that “flawed payment processing, botched paperwork and inaccurate information from FedLoan Servicing is derailing hundreds of public-sector workers from receiving student loan forgiveness.” The piece quotes CFPB Director Richard Cordray saying, “Borrowers working in public service should not miss out on key consumer benefits because their student loan servicer failed to comply with the law. Our examiners will scrutinize whether servicers are telling consumers what they need to do to qualify for loan forgiveness.” The post notes that the report comes as the Trump administration is considering ending the Public Loan Forgiveness program.

DeVos Taps Student Loan Firm CEO Johnson For Top Student Loan Position.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Douglas-Gabriel, Davis) reports Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has announced that she has chosen Reunion Student Loan Finance Corporation CEO Arthur Wayne Johnson “to run the federal government’s trillion-dollar financial aid operations,” noting that ED’s announcement “did not mention Johnson’s role as founder and chief executive” of the firm. The Post reports the announcement comes “almost a month after James Runcie abruptly resigned as chief operating officer of the Office of Federal Student Aid,” warning “of what he described as brewing management problems within the Education Department.”

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Greenwood) reports that ED’s announcement calls Johnson “a highly regarded leader with more than 30 years of experience in the financial services industry and holds a Ph.D. in higher education leadership.” The piece quotes DeVos saying in a statement, “Wayne is the right person to modernize FSA for the 21st Century. He actually wrote the book on student loan debt and will bring a unique combination of CEO-level operating skills and an in-depth understanding of the needs and issues associated with student loan borrowers and their families.” Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) and the Chattanoogan (TN) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20) also cover this story.

University At Buffalo Receives $4.5 Million In Grants To Recruit Robotics, Laser Researchers.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) reports that the University at Buffalo has received $4.5 million in grants to recruit “top scholars and researchers in three specialty fields: robotics, systems pharmacology and x-ray laser technology.” The grants come from SUNY’s Empire Innovation Program, “which helps institutions recruit senior faculty members with proven track records.” The school says that most of the funding “will go toward adding faculty researchers in artificial intelligence and robotics who will support UB’s work in areas including self-driving cars and cyber security.”

Federal Government Using Private Law Firms To Collect Student Loan Debt.

NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) airs a segment on the use of private law firms by the federal government to collect student loan debt. The piece says that private debt collection lawyers are responsible for most of the money that the government has collected from former students whose loans are in arrears. The segment features former ED official Rohit Chopra saying, “The tidal wave of defaults is creating a big opportunity for those to profit off of that pain. And the debt collection industry certainly looks at the student loan market as a big growth opportunity.”

From ASEE
VIDEO – 2017 Global Colloquium in the Azores
This event, September 16-18 (in conjunction with the SEFI Annual Conference), links engineering educators across international borders and brings together lecturers, researchers, and corporate colleagues for an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and perspectives.

VIDEO – 2017 ASEE International Forum at the ASEE Annual Conference
A special registration rate of $150 is available to ASEE Annual Conference Registrants.  This short videohas details of the event, on Wednesday of the conference.

EngineeringCAS Webinar
Learn about the new “common app for engineering graduate schools” in an upcoming free webinar.

Research and Development

Vanderbilt Engineers Assisting NASA With Eclipse Observations.

The Tennessean Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20) reports engineers at Vanderbilt University have launched a high-altitude weather balloon “in preparation for a solar eclipse later this summer.” The piece quotes Vanderbilt graduate researcher Adam Jerrell saying, “there will be a full solar eclipse coming straight through Nashville. We are the largest city on the eclipse path, and it’s a great opportunity.” The piece notes that Tuesday’s launch “was a test-run for NASA’s Eclipse Ballooning Project, which will send cameras attached weather balloons to the edge of space from 30 separate locations nationwide.”

WPLN-AM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Nashville, TN (6/20) reports that it is “perhaps no surprise that the largest celestial event in America this summer will be live-streamed.” The piece explains that Vanderbilt is “one of a few dozen schools along the eclipse’s path that are building these mobile cameras. They’ll rise to 100,000 feet, at which point the weather balloon will burst in a parachute will bring the camera down.”

UT Engineers To Lead Project To Improve Rural Energy Grid.

The Austin (TX) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Subscription Publication) reports the University of Texas Cockrell School of Engineering Center for Electromechanics is partnering with Texas scientific instruments firm National Instruments and will “lead a $1.6 million project to develop technology to improve the energy grid in rural parts of Texas and the United States.” The US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability named CEM and six other institutions to run research projects that are “part of the DOE’s long-term efforts to enhance efficiency and reliability in the energy grid.” The piece explains that the project will “focus specifically on developing better sensors to minimize outage times in rural areas.”

Global Developments

Elbit Unveils New Skylark UAV At Paris Air Show.

Defense News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Sprenger) reports that Elbit Systems is debuting its latest Skylark UAV at the Paris Air Show. According to Defense News, the new Skylark is “essentially a converted drone engineered to function as a missile.” According to Defense News: “Dubbed the SkyStriker, the vehicle can carry a warhead weighing up to 10 kilograms. During its maximum loitering time of two hours, operators can program the drone to circle over an area — either very low to the ground or hiding in cloud cover – and dive upon a target after positive identification through the video feed.” An Elbit official “emphasized the drone’s ease of operation while walking a reporter through the features of a model version hanging in the company’s exhibit pavilion here. Training an operator takes less than one month, according to the official.”

US To Help India Improve Power Grid.

The Press Trust of India Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) reports that ahead of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to the United States, the Trump Administration announced “it will spend $7.5 million to help advance India’s power grid, as part of the two countries’ commitments to ensuring access to affordable and reliable energy.” India’s Ministry of Science and Technology and Industry “will match” the US Energy Department’s commitment, “bringing the total commitment to $30 million, officials here said.” Energy Secretary Rick Perry said, “This new consortium demonstrates the US and Indian commitments to ensuring access to affordable and reliable energy in both countries. … We know that continued grid innovation will promote economic growth and energy security in the United States and India.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Perry Clarifies Statement On Interim Nuclear Waste Storage.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Martin) reports Secretary of Energy Rick Perry “clarified a previous statement on interim nuclear waste storage” for the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on energy, telling them yesterday “that no decisions have been made on temporary sites for spent fuel in Texas, New Mexico or Nevada.” On Tuesday, the former Texas governor “created a firestorm” after “he suggested to the House Appropriations subcommittee on energy that the Nevada National Security Site could also store waste temporarily.” Perry’s “suggestion brought an avalanche of criticism from Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval and members of the state’s congressional delegation who called the proposal ill-conceived and likely illegal.” Perry told the panel, “I think it is appropriate to say, there are no plans at this particular time for interim storage in New Mexico, Nevada or Texas or any other site.” The Nevada governor “said he appreciated the clarification and encouraged ‘the secretary to pursue consent-based interim storage solutions.’”

The Las Vegas Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Gonzalez) reports Perry told the Senate subcommittee “that the waste ‘dilemma’ is one that the federal government has a responsibility to address.” Perry added, “Yesterday what I was doing was attempting to convey my interest in working with Congress to bring resolution to this issue, and that’s all I was saying. … My point is, let’s work together and find solutions to the challenges that vex us and have been in front of us for a while and I’m eternally optimistic, sir, that we can do that in a way that serves this great country.” The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Piro) reports Sen. Dianne Feinstein “said the debate over the future of nuclear waste storage was at a ‘stalemate’ and asked Perry how he would make progress.” Perry responded, “I will throw a lot of Jello at the wall if that’s what is required to stimulate conversations, to try to truly come up with the solution to this.” KSNV-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Las Vegas (6/21, Garcia) and KRNV-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Reno, NV (6/21, KRNV-TV Reno (NV)) provide coverage of Perry’s appearance before the Senate subcommittee on Wednesday.

Bloomberg BNA Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Dabbs), E&E Daily Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Subscription Publication) and the “Energy 202” blog of the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Grandoni) provided coverage of the comments made by Perry on Yucca Mountain and interim nuclear waste storage before the House Energy and Water Development Appropriations Subcommittee on Tuesday.

Senators Criticize Energy Research Cuts Proposed In Budget. The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Siciliano) reports Senate appropriators on Wednesday “criticized President Trump’s Energy Department budget” for “a perceived desire to unravel decades of energy and scientific research through funding cuts that would place other countries ahead of the United States.” Chairman of the Appropriations Committee’s energy and water panel Sen. Lamar Alexander said, “The federal debt is not the result of Congress overspending on science and energy research each year. … The United States faces a choice between falling further behind competitors like China or advancing technologies that can make us safer and more competitive.” President Trump’s budget aims “to cut the agency’s overall budget by 6 percent” and “most of those cuts are made to research and development programs for fossil, nuclear and renewable energy.” Sen. Dianne Feinstein said, “These programs foster new discoveries,” but that would be “decimated by this budget request.” The California Democrat “said she wants to work with Perry to hash out a budget that makes America ‘proud.’”

Perry Fields Questions On Hanford. The Tri-City Herald (WA) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) reports Perry told the subcommittee that questions remain “about whether money is being well spent at the Hanford nuclear reservation.” Perry was questioned by both Sen. Patty Murray and Sen. Jeff Merkley “about spending cuts for environmental cleanup at Hanford included in a fiscal 2018 budget proposal from President Trump’s administration.” Perry said that when it comes to Hanford we need to “get outside the box of how historically the government has looked at it.” Perry “wants to use his experience managing big projects as the Texas governor to make sure the taxpayer gets the best result for their money, he said.” Murray stated, “Yes, but this is a nuclear waste site. … It’s extremely dangerous.”

Perry To Testify Thursday Before Senate Energy And Natural Resources Committee. The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Cama, Henry) reports Energy Secretary Rick Perry will return to Capitol Hill for his “third round…of budget hearings.” At 10:00 AM, Perry will appear before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

House Republicans Reviving Effort To Privatize Air Traffic Control.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Freking) reports House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster said yesterday that next week, the committee will consider his proposed legislation, which would shift responsibility for the nation’s air traffic control operations to a private, nonprofit corporation. The full House likely will vote on the bill in mid-July. The AP says the measure faces bipartisan opposition in the Senate. Shuster explained that his proposal broadens participation in the corporation’s 13-seat board of directors in order to prevent any particular group from dominating the panel. “Their No. 1 priority has to be the success of this corporation,” regardless of which stakeholder group they represent, he said.

President Discusses Electric Grid Cybersecurity With Officials, Industry Leaders.

The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Siciliano) reports, “President Trump met with his top national security advisers on Wednesday, along with energy industry leaders and top confidants, to discuss the cybersecurity threats facing the nation’s electric grid.” A White House statement is quoted saying the President met with officials and “energy sector leaders” regarding “energy sector resilience and cybersecurity.” The Examiner says, “The White House meeting comes a week after a congressionally-chartered grid reliability watchdog, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, said in a report that the number of threats targeting the nation’s grid are increasing.”

New York Utility Requests Rate Hike For Cybersecurity Spending. The Albany (NY) Times Union Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Rulison) reports, “National Grid, upstate New York’s dominant gas and electric utility, plans to spend $7.5 million over the next three years on cyber security.” The spending details “were included in the company’s request for a $407 million rate hike in upstate New York that is being considered by the state Public Service Commission.” National Grid’s New York President Ken Daly is quoted saying, “Enhanced cyber security is one of the company’s top priorities. … With the grid becoming more interactive by the day, and with increasing amounts of data being exchanged between the company, customers and third parties, incremental investment in cyber security is required to mitigate risk and ensure reliability.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Girls Scouts To Introduce Cybersecurity Badges.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/22, Cerbin) reports, “Girl Scouts of the USA and Palo Alto Networks has announced a collaboration to introduce a series of 18 cybersecurity badges for girls K-12.” The badges “will help Scouts explore opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) while building leadership skills,” and will be available starting in September 2018.

Texas Summer Program Introduces Female Students To STEM Education.

The San Antonio Express-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) reports that three years ago, Lisa Rollins, an elementary school teacher in Texas’ Northside Independent School District, founded a two-week summer science camp for female students, dubbed STEM Sisters, to encourage “girls to be excited about science, technology, engineering and math,” or STEM. Cody Elementary School Principal Kittiya Johnson said the district also hopes the program will improve state science standardized test scores. The program is based on curriculum from the Boston Museum of Science, and incorporates hands-on projects and STEM field guest speakers. The district funds the program through a Title I grant targeting “programs focused on improving core learning skills in areas of high poverty.” The Express-News notes the National Science Foundation found women account for only 28 percent of the science and engineering workforce.

Illinois Catholic School Introduces STEAM Lab.

The Lake County (IL) News-Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21) reports St. Joseph Catholic School in Libertyville, Illinois partnered with Creative Learning Systems to introduce “a brand-new, state-of-the-art STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) Lab.” The curriculum will educate students on all five STEAM disciplines, but by integrating “them into a comprehensive program that is based on real-world applications,” providing “students the necessary critical-thinking skills for today’s globally competitive and technologically driven economy.” SJCS Principal Anne Phoenix explained, “Students will participate in a variety of hands-on, self-directed activities in areas such as circuitry, computer graphics, mechanics and structures, robotics, software engineering, and much more, that will challenge and develop their imagination, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

 Wolters Kluwer partners with Vermont Information Technology Leaders to advance health information exchange and accountable care reporting for the state
Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced a partnership with Vermont Information Technology Leaders (VITL) to advance health information exchange and accountable care reporting for the state. Under the partnership, VITL implemented Wolters Kluwer’s Health Language Enterprise Terminology Management Platform to enhance its core interoperability systems and expand its capabilities.
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 Nominations now open for 2018 OWSD-Elsevier Foundation Awards for early-career women scientists in the developing world
Nominations are now open for the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World, a high-profile award which honours the scientific and career achievements of women from developing countries in five regions – Latin America and the Caribbean, the Arab region, Sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South Asia, and East and South-East Asia and the Pacific. The theme for 2018 will be physical sciences, including chemistry, mathematics and physics. Nominations will be accepted until September 15, 2017.
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 Clarivate Analytics names Julia Mair as Chief Marketing Officer
Clarivate Analytics, the global provider of trusted insights and analytics that accelerate the pace of innovation, has announced that Julia Mair has joined the company as its Chief Marketing Officer (CMO). Mair brings to the company deep expertise in creating and executing high-impact global marketing strategies.
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 BMJ appoints Carl Heneghan as new Editor-in-Chief of BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine
Healthcare knowledge provider BMJ has announced Carl Heneghan as the new Editor-in-Chief of BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine. Carl Heneghan is Professor of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) and Director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) at Oxford University’s Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences.
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 The Academy of Management to migrate journals to Atypon’s Literatum online publishing platform
The Academy of Management (AOM), the preeminent global professional association for management and organisation scholars, has selected Atypon to host all Academy of Management journals content on the Literatum online publishing platform. In addition to articles, AOM content includes multimedia capabilities and conference proceedings.
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 FACETS named official journal of the Royal Society of Canada’s Academy of Science
Canadian Science Publishing and the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) have announced that FACETS has been selected as the official journal of the RSC’s Academy of Science. FACETS claims to be Canada’s first and only multidisciplinary open access science journal that publishes and shares rigorously peer-reviewed science which matters to Canadians, as well as the international community, from policy and regulatory frameworks, to cross-disciplinary research and scientific approaches that address questions and issues in new ways.
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 OCLC WorldShare Management Services expands mobile capabilities
Global library cooperative OCLC is introducing Digby, a new mobile app that will soon be available as part of WorldShare Management Services, the cloud-based library services platform. Digby is specifically designed to increase the efficiency, accuracy and independence of student library workers. As a suite of web-based applications, WorldShare Management Services (WMS) already allows library staff to do their work wherever needed—in the library, at home or on the go.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Perry Defends Trump Budget For DOE, Cuts To Energy Research.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Osborne) reports Energy Secretary Rick Perry, during a House Appropriations Committee budget hearing, “defended President Donald Trump’s proposal to slash funding for energy research programs Tuesday as necessary to reduce the government’s budget deficit.” The Energy Secretary “said the budgets cuts were necessary to preserve spending for modernizing the nation’s nuclear weapons arsenal and other ‘key missions.’” Perry stated, “This budget proposal makes some difficult choices, but it is paramount we execute our fiduciary responsibility to the American taxpayer.” E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Subscription Publication) reports Perry promised “that no national laboratories would be ‘shut down’ and said he was confident that the labs — which he called national treasures — would function at a level that Americans ‘need and deserve.’”

The Tri-City Herald (WA) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20) reports the Energy Secretary “disputed whether Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland is at risk of losing 1,000 jobs under the administration’s budget proposal during a House subcommittee hearing Tuesday.” Following a question from Rep. Dan Newhouse, Perry said, “I am comfortable that we will manage these labs in a way that continues to keep the employment levels at the level to deliver the innovation and the technology that this country is going to need.” PNNL, Hanford and the Bonneville Power Administration “were among topics Perry addressed under questioning from Northwest lawmakers.”

The Dallas Morning News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Benning, Bureau) reports that the “House panel grilled Perry – albeit cordially – on a spending plan that would pursue deep cuts in science and energy programs.” The “treatment” by the panel “highlighted Perry’s central role in the battle over the Trump administration’s approach to science.”

The “Morning Energy” blog of Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Adragna) previewed Perry’s appearance before the hearing.

Higher Education

Study Finds Lack Of Diversity Among College Presidents.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Chen, Subscription Publication) reports the American Council on Education released its latest American College President Study on Tuesday. The report, which “has traditionally been viewed as an important census in higher education,” found that despite college campuses’ recent efforts to diversity their student bodies, the average “college president continues to be a white man in his early 60s.” The study also found college presidents are “increasingly preoccupied by (and worried about) budgeting and fund-raising.” More than half of public college presidents said they predict state funding to decrease over the next five years, and three-fourths forecast tuition and fee increases. The Times says that the study “comes as accessibility to affordable higher education is increasingly part of the national discourse, particularly with support from state governments dropping and the Trump administration proposing deep cuts in many programs.”

Policy Researcher Urges Posts-Secondary Institutions To Increase Faculty Diversity.

Renée Byng Yancey, the national program director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation program New Connections, said in a piece for Diverse Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/19) that the growing graduation gap between white students and underrepresented groups may be narrowed by “having more faculty who reflect the race and ethnicity of those students.” The National Center for Education Statistics found “the overwhelming majority” of the 1.5 million faculty members at degree-granting post-secondary institutions in 2013 were white, and black men and women and Latino men and women held only three percent and two percent of faculty positions, respectively. Yancey stressed that post-secondary institutions must “address this disparity for the benefit of all students” and “give a critical eye to their own hiring practices and how they support a culture and climate that is conducive for underrepresented faculty.” Those decisions, Yancey argued, “can have a far-reaching impact on what opportunities their students will encounter.”

Arizona Court Overturns Decision Granting DREAMers In-State Tuition.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Christie) reports the Arizona Court of Appeals, in a Tuesday ruling, decided “a 2015 decision that deferred action recipients were considered legally present in the U.S. and therefore qualify for state benefits was incorrect.” The court explained the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, did not confer this status, and Federal law defers to each state the authority “to decide on optional benefits for DACA recipients – known as DREAMers – and Arizona law bars in-state tuition.” The AP notes Tuesday’s ruling affects nearly 28,000 DACA recipients in the state, including “at least several hundred current state university students and an unknown number attending community colleges.”

From ASEE
VIDEO – 2017 Global Colloquium in the Azores
This event, September 16-18 (in conjunction with the SEFI Annual Conference), links engineering educators across international borders and brings together lecturers, researchers, and corporate colleagues for an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and perspectives.

VIDEO – 2017 ASEE International Forum at the ASEE Annual Conference
A special registration rate of $150 is available to ASEE Annual Conference Registrants.  This short videohas details of the event, on Wednesday of the conference.

EngineeringCAS Webinar
Learn about the new “common app for engineering graduate schools” in an upcoming free webinar.

Research and Development

MIT Engineers Design Microchip For Photonic Processing.

Science Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Hutson) reports MIT engineers “designed a computer chip that uses beams of light to mimic neurons,” adding that “such ‘optical neural networks’ could make any application of so-called deep learning–from virtual assistants to language translators–many times faster and more efficient.” Although scientists have for years “used optical equipment to build simple neural nets…these setups required tabletops full of sensitive mirrors and lenses,” which caused photonic processing to be “dismissed as impractical.” However, MIT researchers’ condensed that equipment into a microchip that “is made of silicon, and…simulates a network of 16 neurons in four ‘layers’ of four.”

Tesla Ramps Up Production Of Model 3 Battery Cells At Nevada Gigafactory.

TechRadar Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Lynch) reports Tesla “is ramping up production of battery cells at its Nevada gigafactory, pointing towards the long-awaited, mass-market Tesla Model 3 vehicle being on track for its own summer production line kick-off,” according to Electrek Share to FacebookShare to Twitter, which cited Tesla CTO JB Straubel as saying Saturday at the Midwest Renewable Energy Association’s Energy Fair 2017, “We’ve started production of Model 3 cells actually right now, so we’re starting to ramp up those cell manufacturing lines and crank this up as we begin to ramp Model 3.” TechRadar states that the production is “an important step for the vehicle, which will make use of the 2170 lithium-ion battery cells engineered in conjunction with Panasonic.”

Brigham And Women’s Hospital Recently Installed 7-Tesla MRI Scanner For Research.

Aunt Minnie Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Forrest) reports Brigham and Women’s Hospital recently installed “an investigational 7-tesla MRI scanner.” The article reports that “while the unit initially will be used for research, the hospital is open to the idea of someday using the scanner clinically,” if the Food and Drug Administration clears the device for clinical use.

Xerion Advanced Battery Considering $50M Investment In Ohio Research Park.

The My Dayton (OH) Daily News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Gnau) reports that “Xerion Advanced Battery Corp.’s CEO said his company is considering spending more than $50 million on manufacturing operations at his company’s Miami Valley Research Park location in Kettering.” The article adds, “A producer of what it touts as a quick-charging battery material, Xerion moved to Kettering from Illinois last year, and city officials hope the business will eventually create 52 full-time jobs.”

Astrophysicist Warns Of Future Impact Threat As Asteroid Day Nears.

The Daily Mail Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Weston) reports that astrophysicist Alan Fitzsimmons is “highlighting the threat” of a potential asteroid collision for Asteroid Day, which will be observed internationally Friday, June 30, the anniversary of a 1908 explosion “thought to have been produced by a comet or asteroid hurtling through Earth’s atmosphere at over 33,500 miles per hour.” The explosion occurred “over the Tunguska region of Siberia, flattening trees nearly 31 miles around.” Speaking from Queen’s University Belfast Astrophysics Research Centre, Fitzsimmons said that “over 1,800 potentially hazardous objects have been discovered so far, but there are many more waiting to be found.” He said that it is “still possible the next Tunguska would take us by surprise, and although we are much better at finding larger asteroids, that does us no good if we are not prepared to do something about them.”

China May Surpass US In Terms Of Scientific Research Spending.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Gebelhoff) reports China now “seems poised to surpass US research spending in the near future.” The article points out that many people have criticized proposed budget cuts to the National Institutes of Health.

Researchers Develop New “Super-Strong,” Lightweight Glassy Carbon.

Tech Briefs Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Hurley) reports a new compressed form of glassy carbon, created by researchers at the Carnegie Institute for Science, uses high pressure and temperatures to form a “super-strong, elastic, electrically-conductive carbon.” The article speculates that the new “carbon opens up possibilities for applications requiring low weight and high strength– from aerospace parts to football helmets.”

Rigetti Aims To Rival Google In Commercializing Quantum Computing.

Wired Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20) contributor Tom Simonite offers a 1,200-word profile of Rigetti Computing, highlighting its work on quantum computing. Simonite says that “no company is yet very close to offering up a quantum computer ready to do useful work existing computers can’t,” because “quantum computing chips in existence are too small,” but Google “pledged to commercialize the technology within five years.” Simonite concludes that “Rigetti will need time, more money, and some hard science to get to [a] successful product.”

Industry News

Aston Martin To Conduct Global Recall Of 1,658 Vantage Cars Over Transmission Software Update.

Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd “is ordering a global recall of 1,658 Vantage cars after problems with a routine transmission software update led to incidents in China in which some cars stalled and lost power,” CEO Andy Palmer told Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Shirouzu), which reports in an exclusive that Palmer “said the decision was taken after a team of Aston Martin engineers went to China in May to investigate a problem that several customers there had been complaining about since 2014.” According to Reuters, “Palmer did not say how much the recall would cost, but knowledgeable people close to the company estimated the total cost at around 300,000 pounds ($380,760).” Reuters adds that “The global recall will be unwelcome publicity for a company that has said for years it wants to go public. It reported its first Q1 profit in a decade in May.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Officials Devise Fix For Road Affected By River Erosion At Grand Teton National Park.

The Jackson Hole (WY) News & Guide Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Dahlby, Daily) reports that the asphalt of Gros Ventre Road in Grand Teton National Park has crumbled due to encroaching river erosion. While a temporary fix has been planned, the piece says “officials are meeting in Kelly tonight to discuss long-term solutions for the road, which has been closed since June 6.” Experts from the Federal Highway Administration and a local geotech firm, along with park engineers, “have assessed the road and erosion and think one-lane traffic can be safely managed through the closed section of roadway.”

Solar Energy Prices Continue Falling.

CNN Money Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Egan) reports that despite President Trump’s rollback of environmental regulations meant to boost the US coal industry, market forces will remain a long-term challenge to the industry. According to a forecast from the research firm Bloomberg New Energy Finance, “coal-fired power is projected to plunge by 51% in the United States” by 2040, whereas “U.S. power generation from renewable energy is likely to skyrocket by 169%.” While solar energy is already “at least as cheap as coal” in some countries, renewable energy costs are poised to continue dropping thanks to “a gush of investments.”

Scholars Face Off Over Stanford Professor’s Claims On Clean-Energy Future.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Porter, Subscription Publication) reports lawmakers have proposed legislation calling for a full transition to renewable energy sources that relies on “what looks like [the] watertight scholarly analysis” of Stanford professor Mark Jacobson. His “widely heralded” 2015 paper says running the American economy on wind, solar, and hydro power would be cheaper than fossil fuels, a feat that likely would be feasible by mid-century. However, the Times says the “proposition is hardly as solid as Professor Jacobson asserts,” based on a “damning” critique due out this week that “took a fine comb” to the oft-cited article. The new article’s conclusions are that Jacobson relied on “invalid modeling tools,” made “modeling errors,” and arrived at “implausible and inadequately supported assumptions.” Yet, “with the stakes so high, the gloves are clearly off,” and Jacobson “is punching back hard” by arguing in a new article that the critique “is riddled with errors and has no impact” on his findings.

LA Programs Aims To Bring Electric Car-Sharing Service To Low-Income Communities.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Tulp) reports that Los Angeles has started a new program aimed at expanding electric car-sharing opportunities to less affluent areas. Known as BlueLA, the program “provides battery-powered vehicles as cheap as 15 cents a minute, or $9 an hour, to lower-income people who qualify.” Electric-car advocates say the program will help to “open the benefits of the emission-free cars up to the masses.”

White House May Intervene On Behalf Of Domestic Solar Panel Manufacturers.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20, Cama) reports that Suniva Inc. and SolarWorld USA are calling for trade penalties on imports of solar panels and related technology, claiming that “a surge of cheap imports from China and elsewhere are destroying domestic manufacturing of the panels.” The Solar Energy Industries Association, which represents “much of the rest of the solar industry,” is opposing the effort, “which it claims would decimate solar power and threaten the growth the sector has seen over the last decade by significantly raising prices.” Citing the wide-ranging authority of the White House to implement trade protections, some trade economists are predicting that Trump could grant the trade penalties “if he believes that the domestic industry has been injured seriously.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Schools Debate Teaching Climate Change.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20) reports on the controversy surrounding the instruction of climate science and global warming in public schools, saying “conservative lawmakers, climate change doubters and others” are working to “push rejected or debunked theories into the classroom.” The piece reports that though climate scientists “overwhelmingly” link manmade emissions with global warming, but says “there’s no such consensus among educators over how climate change and its causes should be taught.” Several states are considering “allowing or requiring teachers to present alternatives to widely accepted viewpoints on such topics.”

Nebraska Summer Program Encourages Girls To Pursue STEAM Fields.

The Omaha (NE) World-Herald Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/20) cites a National Science Foundation study two years ago that found “259,585 graduate students in science and engineering were women, or 42 percent of the total,” and “of those women, only 38,494, or 14.8 percent, were black, Hispanic or American Indian.” In an effort “to pique the interest of African-American and other girls in science, technology, engineering, agriculture, the arts and math,” or STEAM, the Urban League of Nebraska hosts a summer STEAM Academy. The six-week program launched five years ago and, with the help of donors, offers free tuition. On Tuesday, about 15 participating girls visited DLR Group and spoke with the firm’s engineers and architects, toured the facility, and constructed paper towers. In earlier weeks, the girls “visited the University of Nebraska Medical Center, NET in Lincoln and Union Pacific,” and “listened to speakers from TD Ameritrade, College Possible and other places.”

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

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