Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Nature Research in deal with Beijing Technology and Business University and IUFoST to co-publish OA journal npj Science of Food
Nature Research, part of Springer Nature, has announced an agreement with Beijing Technology and Business University and the International Union of Food Science and Technology (IUFoST) to co-publish the high-impact, open access journal npj Science of Food. The journal aims to publish high quality, peer-reviewed original papers, opinions and commentaries to enhance research and understanding of the properties of food, natural or processed, and how processing influences its biological functions.
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New pay-per-use licensing solution for over 20m STM Journal articles launched
Copyright Agency has launched a new pay-per-use licensing solution, RightsPortal Journals, for world class scientific, technical and medical (STM) journal content. Developed in partnership with STM publishers Elsevier,Wiley, and Wolters Kluwer, RightsPortal Journals is an extension to RightsPortal, an online platform for efficiently purchasing, clearing and licensing the rights to reuse content from over 20 million STM journal articles from leading publishers.
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Dr. Antonio Ceriello named Editor-in-Chief of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice journal
STM publisher Elsevier and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have announced the appointment of Professor Antonio Ceriello as the new Editor-in-Chief of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice (DRCP), the official journal of IDF, published by Elsevier. Professor Ceriello will take over from Professor Stephen Colagiuri on July 1st.
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SAGE Publishing and the Chinese Academy of Science sign agreement for all gold OA journals to be available on the GoOA platform
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has signed an agreement with the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) to make all their gold Open Access (OA) journals available on CAS’s GoOA platform to support access to research in the country. Funded by CAS, and run by the National Science Library at CAS, GoOA is a non-commercial service, freely available to all scholars and institutions in China.
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Wolters Kluwer announces Impact Factor gains across Lippincott Williams & Wilkins journal portfolio
Wolters Kluwer has announced Impact Factor gains across its Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW) journal portfolio. The latest Impact Factor (IF) scores and specialty rankings are based on the 2015 Journal Citation Report (Thomson Reuters). For LWW’s 208 titles listed in the JCR Rankings, 46% of the journals had gains over the previous year with 15 titles increasing 25% or more.
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Brill launches new journal – Philological Encounters
International publisher Brill has announced the launch of a new journal in 2016, Philological Encounters, in collaboration with the research program Zukunftsphilologie: Revisiting the Canons of Textual Scholarship (Forum Transregionale Studien/Freie Universität Berlin). The journal will be available both online onhttp://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/ and in print.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Boeing Moving Toward Developing New Mid-Sized Jetliner.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (7/1, Johnsson) reports that Boeing is honing its focus on potentially developing a brand-new, mid-sized jetliner that would “fill the gap in its product line between the largest single-aisle 737 and smallest widebody 787,” a burgeoning market where rival Airbus is starting to establish itself as a leader. The Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer estimates that sales in the “middle-of-market” segment could reach 4,000 to 5,000 passenger jets as carriers establish new routes for the planes. According to Boeing’s General of Airplane Development Mike Delaney, the company is looking to capitalize on the market opportunity, provided that economic factors are amenable to such a move.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (7/1, Ostrower, Subscription Publication) also reports on the story.

Higher Education

Consumer Reports Issues Study On Student Debt.

Consumer Reports Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Rosato) conducted a study of student loan debt finding that it causes “a growing number of Americans” to “regret the price they paid to go to college.” The study shows “how 42 million people came to owe $1.3 trillion in student loans.” Marta Tellado, president and CEO of Consumer Reports, said that “it’s difficult to make a rational decision in a market that lacks accountability and transparency.” It points out that ED has “revamped its College Scorecard tool” to allow users “to filter schools by graduation rates and 10-year-out median salaries of graduates” but because it is “limited to averages by schools” it does not show differences by major and degree. Another problem is that many people “borrow to go to college but never graduate.”

Federal Student Loan Rates To Decrease.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, DiGangi) reports rates for Federal Direct Loans will be lower for the coming academic year. A 2013 law “tied interest rates on government education loans to the 10-year Treasury note yield” which will make the loan rate 3.76% for undergraduate students, down from 4.29% last year. Loans for graduate students and parents will be at 6.31%.

CNN Money Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Lobosco) reports the lower rate “could amount to savings of as much as $360 over the life of your loan,” that is for borrowers who borrow the maximum available.

Study Finds College Diploma Helps In Job Market.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Marksjarvis) reports a study from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce found that the cost of a college diploma is worth it, though it found that college graduates now “make up a larger portion of the workforce than those with high school diplomas,” and those with high school diplomas have not benefited from economic growth since 2008, with 11.5 million of 11.6 million jobs created going “to workers with at least some education beyond high school.”

Syracuse To Add $9 Million In Classroom Technology.

The Syracuse (NY) Post-Standard Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, McMahon) reports Syracuse University will be investing $9 million in classroom technology this summer as part of a larger series of upgrades around the school called the Campus Framework. Science buildings will be able to “support the research of groups like the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory,” while SmartBoards will be installed in classrooms. According to the plans, “more than 15 buildings are undergoing renovations geared toward improving academic spaces.”

Drury Students Benefit From NSF Research Program.

The Springfield (MO) News-Leader Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Brothers) reports on undergraduate research opportunities at Drury University, where students are “able to conduct research in an intimate, small-school setting with faculty mentors” and in the case of Anna Brinck, she is also able to use the lab at the University of Georgia because of the National Science Foundation funded Research Experience for Undergraduates program. In the last three years, “about a dozen Drury students” have taken part in that program.

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ASEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

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Use #ASEEAnnual for social media. Join the social media contest.

Check out the conference highlights.

Research and Development

Autonomous Air Conditioning Seen Having Significant Building Efficiency Potential.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Fears) reports on a autonomous robot air conditioning unit that delivers cool air when needed. Federal energy officials estimate that 14 percent of US energy output goes for air conditioning, heating and ventilation in buildings, largely inefficiently. Saving only two degrees of energy would be “an enormous amount,” equal to converting a quarter of all vehicles on the road to electric hybrids, said Jennifer Gerbi, program director for the Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. The robot was developed by a University of Maryland team competing in a three-year challenge organized by an ARPA-E program called Delivering Efficient Local Thermal Amenities. The Energy Department provided the university with about $2.5 million. Other teams are working on machines to perform a similar function including those at Syracuse University, Stony Brook University at New York, and the University of California at Berkeley.

Workforce

Initial Jobless Claims Up By 10,000 To 268,000; 69th Straight Week Under 300,000.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Chandra) reports the Labor Department announced this morning that initial jobless claims rose last week by 10,000 to 268,000, “a level that’s still consistent with steady improvement in the labor market.” The economists surveyed by Bloomberg had forecast 267,000 new claims. The less-volatile four-week average “held at 266,750.” Bloomberg points out, “For 69 consecutive weeks, claims have been below the 300,000 level that…is typically consistent with an improving job market,” marking “the longest stretch since 1973.”

Manufacturing Sees “Ray Of Hope” In ISM-Chicago Business Barometer.

In what Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Mutikani) describes as “a ray of hope for the downtrodden manufacturing sector,” the Institute for Supply Management-Chicago “said its business barometer jumped 7.5 points to 56.8 this month, the highest since January 2015,” and the Institute for Supply Management “is expected to report on Friday that its national factory index was little changed at 51.4 in June.” According to Reuters, a reading above 50 is an indication of “expansion in the manufacturing sector.”

Canadian Economy Expands In April.

Aided by a 0.4 percent expansion of its manufacturing sector, the Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Mackrael, Subscription Publication) reports the Canadian economy expanded 0.1 percent in April to 1.66 trillion Canadian dollars, according to Statistics Canada. The overall economic expansion was in line with economists’ expectations. Breaking down by sector, the Journal reports utilities expanded 1.9 percent in April, while the public sector, wholesale trade, and retail trade all rose 0.2 percent.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Quinn) reports the April gains follow “declines of 0.2 percent in March and 0.1 percent in February.” Bloomberg adds that “heavy oil production dropped by 7.3 percent,” and “falling crude oil production” linked in part to the wildfires in Alberta “is likely to shrink the economy in May.”

Euro Zone Factory Growth At Six-Month High In June.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (7/1, Cable) reports Markit’s Purchasing Managers’ Index shows business activity in the euro zone expanded at its fastest rate so far this year in June, though the Brexit may cause it to slow in coming months. The Markit PMI “climbed to 52.8 from May’s 51.5, higher than the earlier flash reading of 52.6.” However, according to Markit chief economist Chris Williamson, “Given the uncertainty caused by the prospect of Brexit, it seems likely that business and consumer spending will be adversely affected across the euro area in the short term at least, pulling growth down in coming months.”

China’s Manufacturing PMI Flat In June, Service PMI Shows Expansion.

CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) reports on its website that China released its manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index results on Friday, with the survey dropping to 50.0 in June after registering 50.1 the previous two months. An index reading of 50 indicates the sector is neither expanding nor contracting. Meanwhile, “Caixin’s China June manufacturing PMI, which tracks smaller-scale private firms compared to the official gauge,” also dropped from 49.2 in May to 48.6 in June. According to the AP Share to FacebookShare to
Twitter (7/1, Chan), China’s official manufacturing PMI of 50.0 “underscor[es] how a weak global outlook is challenging Beijing’s efforts to revive growth in the world’s No. 2 economy.”

Meanwhile, Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) reports China’s official non-manufacturing PMI “rose to 53.7, compared to the previous month’s reading of 53.1.” Reuters notes China has counted on its “strong services sector” to help its economy as it shifts “away from a dependence on heavy industry and manufacturing exports.”

Japan’s Final Manufacturing PMI Indicates Fourth Straight Month Of Contraction.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, White) reports the Markit/Nikkei Japan Final Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) rose to 48.1 in June after recording a 47.7 reading in May. While the index increased, “it remained well below the 50 threshold that separates contraction from expansion,” marking the fourth straight month of contraction.

Global Developments

India Successfully Launches Surface To Air Missile System.

The Times Of Israel Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) reports Indian officials of the Defense Research and Development Organization said the military had a successful launch of the Barak 8, a new “surface-to-air missile defense system it developed jointly” with the Israel Aerospace Industries. The defense system can destroy airborne UAVs, jets, missiles, and other projectiles, even when projectiles are launched at the same time.

The Times of India Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) reports the missile system can also be used on board naval vessels and authorities confirmed Indian Navy officials also had a successful test of the equipment. Officials say that “a new production facility to deliver 100 missiles a year has been established for such type of long rang and medium range surface-to-air missiles at M/s Bharat Dynamics Limited, India.”India Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) reports the missile system also incorporates a Multi Functional Surveillance and Threat Alert Radar which will help detect and track incoming projectiles. Military leaders worked with local officials in the Balasore district and “temporarily shifted 3652 civilians residing within 2.5 km radius of the launch pad No. 3 of the ITR at Chandipur to nearby shelter centres this morning to ensure a safe launch of the missile.”

Industry News

HyperSciences Raises Nearly $1.3 Million To Develop High-Powered Projectiles For Drilling.

The Seattle Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Lerman) reports Spokane-based HyperSciences raised $1.29 million to “develop technology that launches fast-moving projectiles into the earth to find a cleaner energy source.” The startup, led by former Blue Origin lead engineer Mark Russell, “has raised $1.2 million of a $2 million funding round, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.” The company develops drilling technology that “aims to make it more efficient to drill into the earth and find energy sources by using high-powered projectiles to break through rock and dirt.”

Boeing Opens Drone Technology Lab In Missouri.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (7/1) reports that Boeing opened the doors to a new drone laboratory nicknamed “the Castle” in St. Charles, Missouri on Thursday. The article explains that the idea behind the Collaborative Autonomous Systems Laboratory (CASL) is “to develop unmanned vehicles that can communicate with each other as well as humans on the ground.” Boeing believes that such drone technologies will be used for both civilian and military purposes in the future.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Leaks Confirm Iris Scanner, Dual-Edge Display.

New leaks of Samsung’s upcoming Galaxy Note 7 surfaced today, Android Authority Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Gondhia) reporting that according to reliable tipster @onleaks, images confirm the device will feature a dual-edge 5.8-inch Super AMOLED display and new iris scanner.

Confirming the new display changes, CNET News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) explains that the “curve-screen Note 7 does make a certain amount of sense” considering the S7 already adopts certain design features from the Edge.

According to Mashable Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Wong), the display isn’t the only component to mimic the company’s smartphone devices, additional features could include an S7-like sensor. Mashable adds, “the fingerprint sensor/home button appears to be rounder than on the S7 and S7 Edge.”

As for the iris scanner, Samsung has already registered for both ‘Samsung Iris’ and ‘Samsung Eyeprint’, according to Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Monckton), adding to speculation the new phablet will offer the new feature.

Engineering and Public Policy

Federal Government Called On To Help Independent Energy Companies Develop Cleaner Energy Innovations.

Bradley A. Blakeman, professor of public policy, politics and international affairs at Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies, writes in The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter’s (6/30, Blakeman) “Contributors” blog about Mesa Natural Gas Solutions, a Wyoming-based company that “runs generators that produce clean, reliable and affordable energy off untreated wellhead gas, providing electricity for on-site oil and gas equipment.” Blakeman calls it a “win-win” that “emissions that were once wasted and dirty are now working to power the drilling operators.” Blakeman says that if Mesa’s generators can work in America, “than it will work globally as well.” Blakeman concludes by calling on Congress and the executive branch to help “companies like Mesa innovate and spread their technology to better the nation.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Company Promotes STEM Through Curricula, Make-A-Thons.

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Jackson) reports on Rachel Williams, co-founder and COO of Paige & Paxton, which she founded with her daughter Kelley Williams, the company’s CEO, “to teach kids about science and math.” She makes use of characters she created to teach her own children 20 years ago. The firm “develops curricula for schools and conducts make-a-thons” and other STEM programs, with a focus on pre-k to second grade. At one make-a-thon on Saturday at Evanston’s Oakton Elementary School, “students spent the day on exercises and projects in physics, structural engineering and paleontology.”

Irvine Schools Offers Angels Science Of Baseball Course Over Summer.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Chan) reports on the Angels Science of Baseball summer course being offered by the Irvine Public Schools Foundation 2016 Summer Enrichment Academy for students from fourth- to sixth-grade. The program was created by University of Arizona systems and industrial engineering associate professor Ricardo Valerdi, and has been supported by the Angel’s foundation. The course uses baseball as a means of exploring mathematical concepts including averages, areas, perimeter.

Some Schools Replace Librarians With “Innovation Specialists” And Libraries With Maker Spaces.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (7/1, Montgomery) reports librarians in Shawnee Mission, Kansas School District are concerned about “the maker movement,” where “at least four” schools are replacing librarians with “innovation specialists” hired to convert libraries “into hands-on laboratories of creation and computer-assisted innovation.” Instead of using libraries, the students have “an electronic tablet or MacBook,” and the libraries are bringing in 3-D printers and Lego robots. Generally the “innovation specialists” have no special certification as do librarians, and some librarians are arguing against the change.

Program Uses Electric Guitar Building To Teach Science.

The Bucks County (PA) Courier Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Bowlin) reports on the National STEM Guitar Project, a program funded by the National Science Foundation, in which students and “teachers spent their mornings in workshops on teaching theory and techniques” then spent the afternoon learning “to build electric guitars.” The program was developed by Mark French, professor of mechanical engineering technology at Purdue University. Building and finishing an electric guitar involves ratios, electricity, magnetism, and chemistry. The program “teaches teachers to make science matter to their students.”

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Cox) reports New Trier High School student Jack Petito said the Guitar Making course “ties in well with his plans to study aerospace engineering in college.” Instructor Jason Boumstein explained the course is “touching the base on many different disciplines,” adding, “Within applied arts, we have engineering, architecture, design technology, and it also brings music into what we do, with the maker experience.”

Iowa College Workshop Helps Teachers Plan Creative Math And Science Lessons.

The Dubuque (IA) Telegraph Herald Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Hinga) reports Loras College offered an eight-day workshop for local math and science teachers on ways to make the subjects more fun and accessible. One of the exercises allowed local middle school students to use math and science to investigate and solve a fake crime. One teacher described the workshop as being an effective lesson in “being more creative in the classroom.”

St. Leo University Leads Technology-Based Teacher Training.

The Tampa Bay (FL) Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30, Solomon) reports Saint Leo University hosted a workshop on integrating technology effectively into the classroom as a way of making learning more “excit[ing]” for students. The workshop also seeks to empower teachers to solve “challenge[s]” in the classroom using technology. Saint Leo was recognized as “being a leader in making technology a priority in education training” by Education Week.

Thursday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

UK wide survey cites the growing importance of online libraries to academics
The 2015 survey of academics, jointly commissioned by Jisc and RLUK and conducted by research organisation Ithaka S+R, has revealed a substantial increase in the way academics use and value online libraries. According to the report, 88% of researchers now see their university library’s collections and subscription as a very important source of data and information.
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Elsevier teams up with the White House National Cancer Moonshot Task Force to develop benchmark report on US cancer research landscape
STM publisher Elsevier has announced an initiative with the White House National Cancer Moonshot Task Force to develop a comprehensive study of cancer research in the United States. The Elsevier report will provide a road map of the cancer research landscape to identify pockets of expertise and opportunity and will be made available for free.
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IET announces new President-elect
The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) has announced that Professor Jeremy Watson will become its next President, taking up the position on October 1. Other appointments taking effect from October 1 include Mike Carr who becomes IET Deputy President. Meanwhile, Andy Bevington and Virginia Hodge both become IET Vice Presidents.
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ASCO names James M. Ford as founding Editor-in-Chief of JCO Precision Oncology
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has announced the appointment of Dr. James M. Ford as Editor-in-Chief of the Society’s new journal, JCO Precision Oncology (JCO PO). Dr. Ford will set the scope and vision for the online-only journal, which will publish scientific and educational content that provides a deeper understanding of actionable cancer genomics.
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ScienceOpen and Altmetric to co-host webinar on the future of altmetrics
Altmetric and ScienceOpen will be co-hosting a webinar on July 4, 2016, at 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM BST titled ‘The future of altmetrics.’ Altmetrics are non-traditional metrics that can be used as alternative measures of scholarly impact. As an article-level metric, they contain information about how research is shared and re-used in a digital environment, such as mentions in tweets, blogs, or Wikipedia pages.
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Cameron Neylon joins OpenAIRE Advisory Board
Open Access Infrastructure for Research in Europe (OpenAIRE) has announced that Cameron Neylon will join the OpenAIRE Advisory Board effective immediately. Cameron Neylon is Professor of Research Communication at the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University and well known agitator for opening up the process of research.
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Amsterdam Universities select Figshare For Institutions to manage research data
Online digital repository Figshare has announced that The University of Amsterdam (UvA) and the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (HvA) are the latest institutions to sign up for the Figshare for Institutions offering. Figshare for Institutions helps academic institutions manage, disseminate and measure the public impact of all their research outputs, while easing the route to compliance with open data mandates.
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Atypon unveils Edinburgh University Press’ new responsive website
Edinburgh University Press (EUP) recently relaunched its publication website on Literatum, Atypon’s online publishing platform. EUP’s 40 journals have been hosted by Atypon since 2008. The new, fully responsive site was constructed using Page Builder, Literatum’s widget-based user experience (UX) design tool that allows publishers to manage their websites’ interface and content, and easily create new journals, landing pages, and microsites.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Virginia Sees Success From Engineering Recruiting Effort In Elementary, Middle, And High Schools.

Virginia Business Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Foster) reports that engineering schools have seen growing enrollment in recent years, but “recruitment of African-American and female students remains a challenge.” In an effort to improve that, “there are dozens of initiatives to interest Virginia elementary, middle and high school students in engineering.” The story cites the ASEE in reporting a 26 percent increase in “undergraduates earning bachelor’s degrees in engineering” from 2005 to 2014. Enrollment of women also increased as they “accounted for 19.9 percent of graduating engineering undergrads” in 2014, up from 17.8 percent in 2009.

Higher Education

Saddleback College To Offer EV Class.

The Orange County (CA) Register Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Percy) reports on a workshop at Saddleback College on “a program that teaches students about electric vehicles in a STEM education setting.” In the program, “students would learn about parts and principles related to electric vehicles” and then build an electric vehicle. The college will start offering the program in the spring or summer of 2017.

Florida College Holds All-Girls Robotics Camp.

The Tampa Bay (FL) Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Knothe) reports on an “all-girls robotics camp” held last week at Hillsborough Community College. The 18 girls who attended worked in pairs on projects such as programming “Lego Mindstorm EV3 robots to quickly traverse an obstacle course of about 50 water bottles.”

Skills USA Hosts Nationals For Career And Technical Education.

The Sheridan (WY) Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Magnusson) reports Skills USA hosted Nationals, an event in which state winners “demonstrate their technical skills, workplace skills and personal skills in 100 hands-on occupational and leadership competitions.” Winners of competitions win varying prizes including “industry prizes, tools of their trade and scholarships.” Sheridan College in Wyoming had some of the most winners, with 11 students competing and ranking in all their events.

GEAR Up Offers Wyoming Students Hands-On Experience.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Filbin) reports on GEAR Up in Wyoming where some local junior high school students are learning welding at Gillette College. Gear Up offers “hands-on workshops that center on activities from creative recycling to…welding.”

From ASEE
ASEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Get news and updates at the conferences blog.

Use #ASEEAnnual for social media. Join the social media contest.

Check out the conference highlights.

Workforce

Company Working To Fill Skills Gap Between College Grads And Employer Demands.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Selingo) reports a “new twist” has emerged in the world of coding boot camps that have been developed “to provide the so-called ‘last-mile training’ necessary” for college graduates to obtain skills employers desire “but are unwilling to provide the necessary training.” Revature, a company in Northern Virginia, is offering coding camps “for free, and then much like a temp staffing agency, places trained workers with employers,” giving employers a trial period.

Industry News

Docomo And DeNA Partner To Make Self-Driving Car.

Nikkei Asian Review (JPN) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/30) reports NTT Docomo, a “Japanese mobile phone service provider” and DeNA, an “internet service company” are partnering to create technology for a self-driving car. They plan to use their superior 5G technology and “experience protecting its mobile network and customer data” to create a lagless technology that is not susceptible to hacking. The partnership is testing their technology on buses before moving to cars.

Intel, Mobileye Work To Develop Self-Driving Cars.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Coppola) reports Intel Corp. and Mobileye NV have teamed up to construct self-driving car technology for BMW AG. On Friday, senior executives will hold a meeting to divulge details of the driverless-vehicle initiative. Automakers are engaging with tech companies, states the article, to keep up with consumer demands. Intel competes with companies like NXP Semiconductors NV and Infineon Technologies AG to provide chips to the auto industry. CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Staff) adds Mobileye touts clients like GM and Tesla.

Siemens Wind Chief Confident Of Sustaining Profit Margins.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29) reports Siemens’ wind power and renewables unit is confident of maintaining its improved profit margin for the rest of the fiscal year. “I’m quite comfortable that we will maintain that margin throughout the fiscal year,” the unit’s chief, Markus Tacke, told analysts on Wednesday

GE Energy To Continue Investing In Renewable Energy Projects With Capacity On The Rise.

In a video on Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter’s (6/29) website, Kevin Walsh, GE Energy Financial Services managing director, said that with solar and wind energy capacity on the rise, “there’s great growth for us. We will continue to invest. We think it’s an attractive invest and we enable GE equipment orders when we do that.” Walsh also says “it’s a ways off” before average rural Americans can be independent of the energy grid, because “the grid is very important as a backup mode, as a primary access to electricity.”

Auto Industry Focusing On AC Units To Meet EPA Standards.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Bennett, Subscription Publication) reports auto manufacturers are adopting new air conditioning technology to help them meet federal fuel-economy standards, with the EPA’s most recent data showing that changes to vehicle cooling accounted for 40% of the reported emissions credits in the US auto industry by 2014. The Journal notes the EPA has focused on AC units in cars for emissions credits over other features because the units emit hydroflourocarbons gasses, which are believed to be a significant contributor to global warming.

Startups Try To Catch Up To Amazon’s Kiva Robots.

In a more than 2,000-word article, Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Bhasin, Clark) reports on how Amazon has controlled the warehouse robot industry through its 2012 acquisition of Kiva robots and subsequent decision to stop selling the robots to other companies, giving Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos “command of an entire industry.” Four years later, startups, such as Quiet Logistics, are emerging with hopes to replace Kiva and put robots in the world’s warehouses. Bloomberg discusses the importance of warehouse robotics, both for creating efficiency and offsetting labor costs.

Airships Touted As Possible Replacement For Cargo Jets.

The Globe and Mail (CAN) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Hansen) reports University of Manitoba professor Barry Prentice recently published a paper titled “Sustainable Transportation: Airships Versus Jet Airplanes” touting the sustainability benefits of using airships instead of cargo planes. Prentice says cargo jets are “the most polluting segment of the aviation industry” because they “are typically the oldest and least fuel-efficient jetliners, but they are also the segment of air transport that might be replaced most easily.” However, Prentice said, “Airships are a green technology that can reduce transport costs and create thousands of jobs directly and tens of thousands indirectly.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

New Jersey High School To Host “Engineering Explorations” Camp.

New Jersey Hills Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29) reports on the “Engineering Explorations” camp to be offered at Madison High School this summer. Director Ryan DelGuercio explained, “This is a camp where students explore their interests in engineering and develop their skills through project based learning. Kids will leave with a strong background in design, problem solving, project fabrication, and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) skills.” There are “three levels of courses” available, with each leading to a different project. Among the projects are “a solar powered car, a model roller coaster, a model skyscraper, an alarm circuit, and robotics.”

Study Finds Men Benefit More Than Women From CTE Programs.

US News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Camera) reports on a study from Cornell University finding career and technical education programs in high school “are largely leaving women out of the picture.” The study found that men who graduated from CTE programs “had higher rates of employment and earned comparable wages” to those from “non-blue-collar communities,” while women who graduated from CTE programs “were less likely to be employed at all and less likely to work in professional occupations,” and “earned far less than their female counterparts from non-blue-collar communities.” The data came from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Pennsylvania Camp Offers Girls A Look At Construction Trades.

Philly (PA) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Von Bergen) reports on Camp MAGIC, where the girls attending “used a drill press, saber saws, a spindle sander, and a high-powered nail gun to build their own toolboxes, and, perhaps, a career in construction.” The camp’s name is an acronym for Mentoring a Girl in Construction. The camp is designed to make girls aware of the opportunities available to them and the training they will need to enter the field.

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

ChemZent, the first English-searchable version of Chemische Zentralblatt, now available in SciFinder
CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, has introduced ChemZent, a new solution available for purchase in SciFinder. ChemZent delivers the complete collection of approximately three million abstracts from Chemisches Zentralblatt, the oldest compendium of chemistry abstracts dating from 1830-1969.
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The IET announces new developments to INSPEC
The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) has announced new developments to its market leading INSPEC database which will increase discoverability of content and provide new functionality to support the research process. INSPEC claims to be the world’s most trusted source of physical sciences and engineering research information, used globally by the most innovative organisations that take seriously the need to give their researchers and students the best tools for their work.
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PPF renews partnership with De Gruyter, provides subscription fulfillment for De Gruyter journals
Publisher Promotion & Fulfillment (PPF), a division of EBSCO Information Services, has renewed its partnership to fulfill subscription services for journals from De Gruyter. The partnership ensures that the needs of De Gruyter subscribers are met while allowing the company to focus on the editorial aspects of its business.
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UpToDate from Wolters Kluwer now accredited by Saudi Commission for Health Specialties as continuing medical education resource
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced that UpToDate®, its evidence-based clinical decision support resource, is now accredited by the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCFHS) as a continuing medical education resource. Healthcare practitioners in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia can earn CME credits while using UpToDate to answer clinical questions.
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EDP Sciences now publishing OA journal Regenerative Medicine Research
STM publisher EDP Sciences has announced that it is now publishing the fully Open Access journal,Regenerative Medicine Research. EDP officially took over publication of the journal during spring 2016. The first issue published by EDP Sciences will be opened in the second semester of 2016, publishing the articles newly submitted and accepted since the journal transfer.
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RCS joins OpenAthens access management federation
The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCS), a professional membership association and registered charity devoted to advancing the highest standards of surgical care, has announced an expanded strategic partnership with Eduserv. RCS is the latest publisher to join the OpenAthens access management federation to provide its members with single sign-on access to their collection of journals.
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Marcus Roberts joins Allen Press’ growing executive sales team
Allen Press, Inc. has announced the addition of Marcus Roberts to its growing executive sales team. Roberts has more than 25 years of experience selling advertising production services, design and print to retail companies and design firms nationwide. He has a proven track record of helping major retailers increase traffic and sales through advertising production, direct mail and technological solutions.
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Key Findings of the arXiv User Survey

As part of its 25th anniversary vision-setting process, the arXiv team at Cornell University Library conducted a user survey in April 2016 to seek input from the global user community about current services and future directions.  They received 36,000 responses:

https://confluence.cornell.edu/x/I4UMF

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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

High School Student Creates 3-D Printed Prosthetic Hand for His Little Brother.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Balingit) reports Sterling, Virginia high school student Gabriel Filippini and his technology teacher Kurt O’Connor used a 3-D printer to construct a prosthetic hand for Filippini’s little brother, Lucas, who was born without a left hand. They signed up to receive a donated hand from Enabling the Future, “an organization that enlists volunteers to use 3-D printers to build hands,” but later decided to use the group’s free blueprints to make the hand. O’Connor was “privately skeptical” about the task, but “welcomed the challenge and was moved by Gabriel’s dedication to his little brother.” He spent 40 hours designing the hand, and had to scrap two models that were too large for Lucas. On Lucas’ sixth birthday, his family fitted him with the hand for the first time in O’Connor’s classroom.

WRC-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Washington (6/28, Carey. Hartleb) reports on its website that O’Connor said he “plans to incorporate new projects such as the one he and Fillppini took on this year, into his engineering classes.”

The Loudoun (VA) Times-Mirror Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Dellinger) reports Lucas says he is still becoming familiar with his new “robot hand,” and he “looks forward to learning to tie his shoes in the near future”

Higher Education

Education Department To Revise Financial Aid Application For Homeless Students.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Douglas-Gabriel) reports that in response to requests from Sen. Patty Murray, who has urged the Education Department to revise the federal financial aid application “to make it easier for homeless college students to access loans and grants,” Education Secretary King said Monday that the department would “clarify the language in the application and streamline the process for determining the status of some 22- and 23-year-old applicants who indicate that they are homeless.” Murray hailed the move as “a strong step forward to tackle some of the barriers that unaccompanied homeless students face in accessing higher education.”

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Research and Development

Researchers Examining Locust Olfactory System To Design Biorobotic Sensing Devices.

Science Daily Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28) reports a group of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis, led by Baranidharan Raman, associate professor of biomedical engineering, received a three-year, $750,000 grant from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to “use the highly sensitive locust olfactory system as the basis to develop a bio-hybrid nose” that could be used in homeland security applications. Raman explained biological sensing systems are more complicated than engineered ones and that “understanding the fundamental olfactory processing principle is necessary to engineer solutions inspired by biology.”

Workforce

Cybersecurity Leaders Discuss Growing Need For Educated Workers.

The San Antonio Express-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Petersen) reports on the cybersecurity conference co-hosted by the US Chamber of Commerce in San Antonio this week. Security experts warned cyber attacks against US businesses will continue occurring “and there’s no end in sight.” Texas Representative Will Hurd, chair of the Information Technology Subcommittee of the Committee of Oversight and Government Reform, discussed the importance of communication between the federal government, law enforcement, and small business to counter cyber crime. Hurd also touched on the need for educated workers to fill cybersecurity jobs. He pointed out there is an abundance of cyber jobs in San Antonio, and “The Every Student Succeeds Act would allow these school districts to adjust their teachings as they see fit to meet the needs of their community.”

Industry News

Newest U.S. Refinery Sold To Tesoro At Loss, Hurt By Low Oil Prices.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Scheyder) reports North Dakota’s Dickinson refinery was sold to Tesoro at a loss, “as low oil prices took a toll on the region’s energy industry, crimping the appetite for diesel.” MDU Resources Group and Calumet Specialty Product Partners LP, which were equal partners, built the refinery in 2013, and the sale to Tesoro “makes it unlikely” another refinery will be constructed in the U.S. anytime soon, “despite the glut of cheap crude due to shale oil production.” The sale price was undisclosed, but Tesoro “assumed the refinery’s $66 million in debt and said it would invest $10 million.” The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Nicholson) reports the refinery had struggled to generate a profit due to “a dramatic fall in demand” and “low diesel prices.” Calumet CEO Tim Go described the sale as “an optimal outcome for all parties involved.” In a brief, Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28) reports Tesoro says it expects to “generate more than $20 million in annual operating income” from the refinery

Automakers Group Says Regulators Underestimate Cost Of Fuel Economy, Emission Targets.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Lippert) reports that the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers said in a report posted on its website Monday that the federal government has underestimated the cost and difficulty of achieving their vehicle fuel-economy and greenhouse-gas targets for 2025. Even with the current government estimate of $1,800 a vehicle in added costs, “the payback period for alternative technologies extends beyond the timeframe most consumers consider; it is likely to remain that way,” according to the report. The industry alliance is seeking to influence the upcoming midterm evaluation of a the 2011 plan by the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the California Air Resources Board. “The actual cost of the program depends on this projected technology mix,” the alliance said.

Engineering and Public Policy

Bipartisan Career And Technical Education Bill Introduced In House.

Education Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Ujifusa) reports Reps. Glenn Thompson (R-PA) and Katherine Clark (D-MA) have introduced the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, the latest reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. It is intended to offer “more flexibility” to states so as to “allow them to better align programs with current economic needs.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Massachusetts Approves K-12 Technology Education Standards.

On its website WBUR-FM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Boston (6/28, Kennedy) reports Massachusetts has approved “new digital literacy and computer science standards” that may be implemented by schools “as soon as this fall.” The Massachusetts Department of Education has collaborated with MIT, leading technology companies, and the Education Development Center to create four “topics” that students will learn about from Kindergarten through 12th grade. Much of the curriculum development needed for these “topics” will be funded by a “three-year National Science Foundation grant.”

Los Angeles Schools Welcome New Technology Standards.

Education Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Herold) reports that after a failed technology project in 2013 and 2014, Los Angeles schools are welcoming “‘refreshed’ student technology standards” created by the International Society for Technology in Education. The standards do not include “any specific technologies or tools,” but instead give seven “identities” that students should fulfill. Los Angeles Schools are “still providing devices” to individuals, but “its focus is” now “on being student-centered and flexible.”

Arkansas School District Finds Disparities In Technology Distribution.

The Arkansas Democrat Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Perozek) reports that Bentonville Schools found inequality in “student-to-computer ratios” across schools despite recent improvements. A report finds that ratios vary between “.06 students per device” and “2.5 students per device” due to disparities in funding. Although all schools receive the same state funding, the individual schools have discretion over spending, and some schools receive federal Title I funding they can use towards devices.

Fort Bend To Expand CTE.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Kadifa) reports Fort Bend Independent School District is planning to build a new center that will be the hub of “career and technical education” to open in 2018. The new building will be open to the “public at night and on weekends” and will offer courses in “education, culinary arts, cosmetology, transportation and advanced construction” for all the district’s high school students. The building plan is being voted on by trustees in July.

University Of Texas At Arlington Hosts Summer Science Program.

The Fort Worth (TX) Star-Telegram Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Smith) reports the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) is hosting the Bernard Harris Mars Lander Challenge, a “hands-on class in a two-week summer science program.” Approximately 40 North Texas middle school students engaged in STEM activities during the camp, such as designing a model spacecraft that can safely land. Since 2006, the program, which takes place on 10 university campuses nationwide, “has reached more than 19,000 students,” and allows “students from low-income or working-class families to be exposed to STEM learning in a college setting.” Greg Hale, an assistant dean at UTA, said, “This is the most fun two weeks of my year,” and noted this year’s theme is water quality.

KDFW-TV Dallas (6/28, 9:43 a.m. CDT) reports Bernard Harris, the first African-American in space, spoke to children at the camp. He said, “If we provide the right environment, the nurturing environment that says its okay to take those skills to another level, they will.”KUVN-TV Dallas (6/27, 10:34 p.m. CDT) provided Spanish-language coverage of the science program.

Kentucky Teacher Selected To Work With PBS, NASA For STEM Curriculum.

The Bowling Green (KY) Daily News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/28, Frint) reports Jody Richards Elementary School first grade teacher Kara Northern has been chosen as “one of 50 advisers” from a pool of more than 650 applicants to serve as a teacher adviser for the national “Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms” STEM education program. The program aims to “create new instructional models and digital media tools to teach” STEM subjects, featuring “a diverse group” of teachers from across the US. PBS station WGBH will produce the new program in collaboration with NASA and distribute it “free of charge” to schools across the country through PBS LearningMedia. Participants will get “prototypes of the digital learning resources in either August or September of this year” to test in classrooms starting in the fall of 2016, with results to be posted by November, according to the WGBH website.

Also in the News

West Virginia’s Heritage Farm Museum And Village Hosts Arts And Bots Camp.

The Huntington (WV) Herald-Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/29, Mendez) reports on the Heritage Arts and Bots Camp at the Heritage Farm Museum and Village in Huntington, West Virginia. The camp, for students in grades 4-6, offers the chance for students “to create their own robot using recycled materials and a Hummingbird Robotics Kit.” The camp is supported by the Marshall University June Harless Center for Rural Education, “which provides teachers, computers, Hummingbird Robotics Kits and computer programming software for the robots.”

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Springer and Palgrave Macmillan journals announce increased number of journals in JCR
The 2016 update of the Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports® (JCR) lists a total of 1,681 Springer journals among its numbers. This figure includes the Palgrave Macmillan journals which are now hosted on the online platform SpringerLink. A total of 52 percent of these journals increased their impact factor from 2014 to 2015.
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2016 SSP Annual Meeting session recordings now available
At this year’s SSP Annual Meeting, boundaries were stretched, ideas were challenged, and borders were crossed. For those who were not able to attend or could not make it to all the sessions, recordings of all sessions including keynotes, plenaries, and concurrent sessions are now available in the SSP Library. The SSP Library is currently open to the public.
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HighWire announces three key appointments, boosts customer performance
Following the opening remarks by HighWire Press, Inc. CEO, Dan Filby at the Spring HighWire Publishers’ Meeting, the HighWire leadership team has been further strengthened by the appointment of three key individuals: John Doherty, Director Technical Support; Andre Kvaternik, Senior Director Professional Services; and Rob Smyth, Director of Engineering Quality Assurance. The new appointments show HighWire’s commitment to providing outstanding customer experience by delivering operational excellence.
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Washington Research Library Consortium selects Ex Libris Alma and Primo
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC), based in the Washington, DC area, has selected the Ex Libris Alma® library management service and Primo® discovery and delivery solution to help fulfill the consortium’s priorities of coordinating collections across all partner institutions (including its high-density Shared Collections Facility) and presenting end-users with a unified view of WRLC’s shared collection.
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University Press of Colorado Director, Darrin Pratt, to lead AAUP as 2016–2017 President
Darrin Pratt, Director of the University Press of Colorado, assumed leadership of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) on June 18, 2016, at the Association’s annual meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Preceded by Meredith Babb, Director of the University of Florida Press, Pratt will lead the AAUP for one year, through June of 2017.
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The Charlesworth Group to represent Frontiers in China
The Charlesworth Group has announced its partnership with Frontiers to provide language editing services for its authors globally, coupled with local office support in China. This new arrangement will see The Charlesworth Group providing helpdesk services to Frontiers’ authors and enquirers in Mainland China, and facilitating the management of queries from potential authors alongside marketing and promotional services to support Frontiers’ profile and brand awareness in China.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Amazon Announces Coming Online Marketplace For Education.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Singer, Subscription Publication) reports on Amazon Inspire, the company’s “major foray into the education technology market for primary and secondary schools.” It is “an online marketplace with tens of thousands of free lesson plans” and other materials. It should be available later this summer.

The Puget Sound (WA) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Lamm, Subscription Publication) reports Inspire is a free digital service that enables teachers to upload and share resources such as lesson plans, software, and worksheets. This service is part of a US Department of Education initiative to expand teachers’ digital access to teaching tools.

TIME Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Rao) adds that for now these services are free for teachers. However, according to one report “global education technology spending will reach $19 billion by 2019,” and Amazon is not the only company looking to tap into this massive market.

Higher Education

Study: College Is Not Affordable, Especially For Low Income Students.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Lambeck) reports the 2016 College Affordability Diagnosis found that Connecticut was around the average in “college affordability,” ranking at 21st nationwide. The study found that in Connecticut it is impossible to “work one’s way through state college without incurring debt,” as both public and private colleges would require more than a full-time job to pay tuition. The study also found that regardless of affordability and financial aid, lower income families are expected to contribute a greater “percentage of their overall income to pay” for college.

Washington State To Cut University Tuition.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Li) reports that while many colleges “hike” their tuition, Washington state has approved tuition cuts between 15 and 20 percent for public state universities. Other colleges and state legislatures are making similar moves, but not without opponents arguing these cuts will “make those smaller colleges already in financial trouble struggle to stay open.”

Missouri Senator Pushes For Pell Grant Expansion.

The Springfield (MO) News-Leader Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Riley) reports Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) is trying to get the US Department of Education’s Pell Grants more funding so that they apply to summer months, as they did “nearly a decade ago.” The aim of this push is to keep the “neediest students…on track to graduate,” by being able to take classes over the summer. Under Blunt’s plan, the “average Pell Grant” would increase by “$1,650 a year.”

University Of New Mexico Nearing Agreement With DOJ On Sexual Misconduct Policy.

The Albuquerque (NM) Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Quintana) reports the University of New Mexico has announced it is likely to reach an “agreement” with the US Justice Department “within months” over how to “update” policies so that the school can effectively handle sexual misconduct cases. In 2014, the Department of Justice began investigating UNM’s “fail[ure] to comply with gender anti-discrimination laws.” The new policy updates will “eliminate redundant” rules and “require…students to take online training regarding sexual assault and harassment.”

NSF Grant To Support Precision Agriculture At Clark State Community College.

The Dayton (OH) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Navera, Subscription Publication) reports Clark State Community College in Springfield, Ohio has received a $400,000 grant to support its Precision Agriculture degree program. The program includes training in the use of “drones to collect topography and other kinds of information on how crops are growing.”

From ASEE
ASEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Get news and updates at the conferences blog.

Use #ASEEAnnual for social media. Join the social media contest.

Check out the conference highlights.

Research and Development

NASA Testing World’s Most Powerful Rocket Ahead Of 2018 Launch.

Wired Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27) reports that NASA is conducting a second and final round of qualification testing for the powerful Space Launch System (SLS) booster on Tuesday morning at Orbital ATK’s facilities in Utah “to determine whether SLS is ready to send the Orion spacecraft on the first leg of Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), an unmanned mission planned for 2018.” The article explains that EM-1 needs to the SLS, “the most powerful rocket in the world,” in order to launch the Orion capsule 40,000 miles beyond the moon, “which is further than any spacecraft built for humans has ever gone.”

SPACE Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27) adds that when it is ready for launch in 2018, the booster “will consist of a core stage powered by four RS-25 engines,” as well as “two 177-foot-tall (54 meters) solid rocket boosters like the one being tested Tuesday.”

PC Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27) notes that NASA says that although the 2018 mission will be unmanned, “it paves the way for future missions with astronauts.”

Industry News

Commercial Drone Usage To Expand Following New Rules.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Mims, Subscription Publication) reports on the future role of commercial drones in the wake of the FAA’s new regulations, which are becoming increasingly popular in photography, surveying, mapping, agriculture, insurance, and more.

Engineering and Public Policy

Federal Regulators Leaving Autonomous Car Manufacturers In “Gray Zone.”

NBC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Eisenstein) reports Mercedes-Benz USA product management general manager Bart Herring said federal regulators are pushing automakers’ self-driving vehicle initiatives into a “gray zone” because they “don’t want to stand in the way and that’s very progressive, something that we as a manufacturer really appreciate,” but simultaneously create uncertainties on future technological limitations. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is unable to develop regulations swiftly enough to keep up with the technological developments, and Consumer Watchdog director John M. Simpson warned that the resulting industry freedoms that result could be “foolhardy” and “dangerous.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

New York Teachers Develop Marine Science Track From Grade School To College.

Chalkbeat New York Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Disare) reports on high school teacher Lane Rosen who is working with other teachers on Coney Island to “build a marine science pipeline” from elementary school through college. Students at P.S. 188 have “a science-heavy curriculum that includes basic coding and experimenting with Lego robotics,” followed by advanced robotics at I.S. 281 and marine science and technology at John Dewey High School. They are now working with Kingsborough College and the local divers union.

California District Offers Career Pathways In Its High Schools.

The San Francisco Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27) reports on Hayward Unified School District’s effort to boost STEM education at its high schools by adding “new career pathways” such as Biomedical, Advanced Manufacturing, and Engineering. The pathways are four-year programs and all meet admissions requires for the state’s universities. They all also make use of “cutting edge technology, from a 3-D printer pod that can create prosthetics to laser cutters and tool and die makers.” In addition to STEM fields there are pathways targeted to careers in law enforcement and business. Local private schools have developed similar programs.

Florida High School Students Bring Science Lessons To Elementary School.

The Orlando (FL) Sentinel Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Carter) reports on a program through which science students at East Ridge High School teach Lost Lake Elementary students. The 75 high school students developed 36 lessons which they taught at different stations. The elementary students chose three stations and spent a half hour at each station, learning the science and conducting an experiment.

Also in the News

Bloomberg Business Analysis: Cybersecurity Industry May Have Peaked.

Bloomberg Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Niemi) analyzes the current state of the cybersecurity business and claims the “industry has reached a critical crossroads” after reports that Intel is trying to sell the company that was McAfee and FireEye “has fielded takeover offers.” Bloomberg Business says the flurry of activity shows that “cybersecurity mania has peaked.” Bloomberg Business concludes that hackers are not going away, but for struggling companies “the moment of reckoning is here.” Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27) presents a video interview with columnist Shira Ovide, who says fallout from Brexit and the struggling industry may force cybersecurity firms to consolidate. Ovide says now is the time for struggling companies to prove they have technology worth funding and a viable business plan to stay relevant.

Virginia Establishes Criteria For Cybersecurity Apprenticeships. The Hampton Roads (VA) Virginian-Pilot Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/27, Delesline) reports the Virginia Apprenticeship Council has established criteria for registered apprenticeships for occupations of cybersecurity analyst, computer forensics analyst, and incident response analyst. Apprenticeships are administered by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry.

Opinion: Cybersecurity Could Be Improved If Careless Users Were Punished. In an op-ed for The Atlantic Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(6/27), Professor Josephine Wolff argues that one way to improve cybersecurity is to impose “concrete penalties and consequences associated with participating in bots, falling for phishing attacks, failing to install security updates, and other basics of computer hygiene” on Internet users who unwittingly propagate attacks through their compromised computers. Wolff opines there must be a serious debate over “the possibility of individual liability for unintentional complicity in computer crimes.”

Monday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier unveils eight alternative and renewable energy books at ASME Power & Energy Conference & Exhibition
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of Storing Energy: With Special Reference to Renewable Energy Sources by Trevor Letcher, a comprehensive volume covering the various types of renewable energy storage for engineers and scientists. This up-to-date book on energy storage developments, along with seven additional new alternative and renewable energy titles, will be featured in Elsevier’s booth # 307 at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME Power & Energy Conference & Exhibition, June 26-30, in Charlotte, NC.
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ProQuest partners with major publishers to allow customers via its OASIS system to order ebooks from even more ebook platforms
ProQuest is teaming with major publishers in the academic book market to empower customers via its OASIS system with the ability to order ebooks from even more ebook platforms. In the coming months, ebook platforms from such scholarly book publishers as Oxford University Press and IGI Global will be accessible from OASIS.
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Routledge and the Research Council on Mathematics Learning announce publishing partnership
Academic publisher Taylor & Francis Group and the Research Council on Mathematics Learning (RCML) have announced a new publishing partnership. Beginning with the 2017 Volume, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute RCML’s highly regarded journal, Investigations in Mathematics Learning, under the Routledge imprint.
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CHORUS adds public access flag to search results
Finding publicly accessible content just got a little easier with the addition of a new functionality to the CHORUSsearch beta results to indicate whether or not an article is publicly accessible, or when it will be made available if known. Every article in the CHORUS member database is checked and confirmed through an internal audit process. Content is marked as PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE only when the full text is freely available.
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New community-based open source environment to provoke conversation about library innovation and technology
Libraries and service providers have come together to reshape the future of libraries and develop new technologies. The new initiative, FOLIO, provides a platform for libraries, service providers, and other organisations to team up to redefine library automation via open source projects. The goal is to cultivate interest groups, form partnerships and spark conversations that will lead to the creation of new services and technologies for libraries.
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Ex Libris continues to improve library productivity with mobile app – Alma Mobile
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that its Alma library management service now enables librarians to access Alma from anywhere, using a mobile device. It is expected that the Alma Mobile will significantly improve libraries’ operational efficiency. Librarians can now access task lists and perform fulfillment activities on the go, even scanning item barcodes to register in-house use from anywhere in the library.
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Frontline becomes only medical publisher to complete database audit of 810,000 HCPs
Frontline Medical Communications (FMC), a leader in digital, print and live events, recently completed an audit of its database, the only medical publisher to have an audit of this type. BPA Worldwide, an independent, third-party, using widely accepted auditing procedures, conducted an examination and verification of the Frontline Healthcare Practitioner database.
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Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Roger C. Schonfeld (Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business); Joseph Esposito (Libraries May Have Gotten the Privacy Thing All Wrong); Hrynaszkiewicz (Progress on pragmatic sharing of clinical data); Julia Himmrich (How should academics interact with policy makers? Lessons on building a long-term advocacy strategy.); and Charlie Rapple (Hootsuite for academia? How to increase the visibility, downloads and impact of publications using Kudos). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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