ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

GM, TARDEC Partner In Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Car Project.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) reports General Motors and the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, or TARDEC, are collaborating to develop a Colorado-based fuel cell electric vehicle, scheduled to be unveiled in October at an Association of the United States Army fall meeting. CNET News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) said in an online video that the concept truck will help TARDEC test fuel cell viability in the field and lead GM into “a bit of non-traditional powertrain development.”

Mashable Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Jaynes) reports the collaboration will enable TARDEC to use consumer-driven automotive technology without developing its own hydrogen fuel cell plant. TARDEC will provide GM with feedback on its applications of the non-standard fuel cell technology, which will allow GM to determine the durability of the hydrogen fuel cell. Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) explains the project will also benefit GM’s research into fuel cell stack technology, which enables vehicles to travel longer distances than traditional electric cars powered with batteries. The article notes that GM and Honda have also partnered together to create fuel cell and hydrogen storage systems by 2020.

The Detroit Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Gardner) reports TARDEC director Paul Rogers explained, “Hydrogen fuel cells as a power source have the potential to bring to the force incredibly valuable capabilities.” Rogers said he expects the concept truck to offer quieter mobility and electricity generation “for needs away from the vehicle.” The Army plans to conduct demonstrations and user assessments next year.

Digital Trends Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) says GM and TARDEC’s relationship began in 2013, when the two parties agreed to partner together to research potential hydrogen fuel cell materials and designs. Research for the project will take place at TARDEC’s Michigan facility, where GM has a technical center.

Higher Education

WSJournal: Administration Policies Will Force For-Profit Colleges Into Bankruptcy.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Subscription Publication) editorializes that the Administration would like to put as many for-profit colleges as possible out of business. The decision last week by the Education Department to deny ITT Technical Institute federal financial aid funds sends a signal to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and state attorneys general to vigorously investigate ITT and other for-profit colleges. The Journal is worried that the Administration’s policy could force ITT into bankruptcy, which would mean that current ITT students would be left with significant debt but no college degree. Additionally, taxpayers would be liable for any student-debt relief in the wake of an ITT bankruptcy.

VA Warns Veterans Of Possible Collapse Of ITT. Military Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(8/30) reports that the Veterans Affairs Department is warning veterans enrolled in schools owned by ITT Educational Services that they should “brace for the possibility the for-profit college franchise ‘goes out of business.’” The article describes the unfolding troubles the firm is facing in the wake of ED’s recent decision to bar its students from Federal student aid, and says that while ED’s sanctions don’t impact GI Bill benefits, they do raise concerns about the chain’s future.

Des Moines Register: Crackdown On ITT Long Overdue. An editorial in the Des Moines (IA) Register Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) says ED’s moves against ITT are overdue, saying they follow “fraud lawsuits filed against the school by the SEC and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.” The piece says ED “is concerned that the school is nearing financial collapse and could take students and taxpayers down with it,” quoting Education Secretary John King saying, “Looking at all of the risk factors, it’s clear that we need increased financial protection and that it simply would not be responsible or in the best interest of students to allow ITT to continue enrolling new students who rely on federal student aid funds.”

Colorado University Gets NSF Funding To Research Ways To Increase Students’ Interest In Science.

The Greeley (CO) Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) reports that the National Science Foundation has awarded a $255,000 grant to researchers at the University of Northern Colorado who “are looking into whether a research-based class at UNC boosts student retention in science.” The three-year study will incorporate “data at three other colleges and universities that are incorporating the class into their curriculum.”

Documentary Fires Back At Public College Critics.

The Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Mangan) reports that a documentary called “Starving the Beast: The Battle to Disrupt and Reform America’s Public Universities,” which takes the view that public universities “are reeling from the effects of 35 years of underfunding, combined with a coordinated campaign by reform-minded groups to treat universities as businesses and students as customers,” is scheduled to open on Friday in Washington, and next week, in New York City. The documentary “includes lengthy interviews with some of the most polarizing figures who have sought to shape the futures of the flagship campuses at the University of Texas, Texas A&M University, Louisiana State University, the University of Virginia, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of North Carolina. In many cases, the battles being waged reflected similar philosophical shifts.”

From ASEE
ABET Update
The Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) Criteria Committee met in Baltimore last month to continue reviewing the EAC Criteria 3 and 5 Proposal. After spending months categorizing, summarizing, and evaluating each one of the hundreds of comments, the committee has taken that feedback into consideration and made a number of modifications to the content of the proposal.

The Engineering Area Delegation will review the proposal in late October, as it has the final approval authority for these proposed changes. The Delegation has three options: approve the proposed criteria as written and implement, delay final approval for one year and seek additional public comment, or reject the proposal.  More details are here.


Envisioning the Future of the Maker Movement
A new report from ASEE on this important development in engineering education.


Sustainable Development Primer for Higher Education Presidents, Chancellors, Trustees and Senior Leaders
This new primer describes the sustainability related, crucial roles and tasks for presidents, trustees, and senior leadership and explains how sustainability is a robust national trend in higher education

Research and Development

New Contact Lenses Gradually Deliver Medication To The Eye.

In “To Your Health,” the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Cha) reports investigators have “come up with a new type of contact-lens system that gradually delivers medication to” the eye while being worn. The lenses have “a thin film that holds a medication, but only on the periphery so that the middle is clear.” What’s more, the “middle part can be designed with no refractive power…or to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness, as contacts usually do.”

HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Dallas) points out, “This kind of contact lens could help people who have a hard time using eye drops to treat conditions such as glaucoma.” The lenses “were able to effectively lower the eye pressure in monkeys with glaucoma at least as much as the standard eye drops used to treat the disease.” The findings Share to FacebookShare to Twitter were published online in Ophthalmology.

EmDrive Paper To Be Published In AIAA Journal Of Propulsion And Power.

International Business Times (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) reports that the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics is set to publish a paper, titled “Measurement of Impulsive Thrust from a Closed Radio Frequency Cavity in Vacuum,” on NASA Eagleworks Laboratories’ work on achieving thrust from EmDrive space propulsion technology. The International Business Times reports the paper will be published in the AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power, and describes the AIAA as “one of the world’s largest technical societies dedicated to aerospace innovations.”

Blasting News (CHE) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Whittington) reports that the drive is the “brainchild” of British engineer Roger Shawyer.

Researchers Explore Communication Between Driverless Cars And Pedestrians.

The Atlantic Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, LaFrance) reports that designers and engineers of driverless cars are exploring means of communication between driverless cars and pedestrians. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data shows that “Nearly 5,000 pedestrians were killed by cars in 2014 in the United States alone.” The article notes that driverless cars “may be able to reduce those statistics significantly,” but that “even the best-programmed autonomous cars will be unable to prevent every pedestrian death unless those vehicles can find a way to prompt safer pedestrian behaviors.” Experts say that “gaining public trust” will be a major challenge for the autonomous vehicle industry as the technology continues to emerge.

Solar Developers, Duke Energy Agree On Grid Connection Standards.

The Charlotte (NC) Observer Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Henderson) reports Duke Energy has reached an agreement with “33 utility-scale solar developer…on grid connection criteria” following “a dispute over how they were applied.” The utility says the a number of solar farms built North Carolina “are sometimes going up in inconvenient places.” Solar farms in North Carolina “are most often built in rural places served by lower-voltage distribution systems.” Duke spokesman Randy Wheeless said, “In some areas of our system we’re reaching a saturation point with solar, and in some places it is ill-placed.” He added that “too much energy from solar farms may flow into some circuits…while elsewhere the off-and-on nature of solar power causes energy fluctuations for customers.” Energy Central Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) and Engineering News-Record Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) also carried the piece.

The Charlotte (NC) Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Subscription Publication) has a paywalled report headlined, “Duke Energy Compromises On New Requirement That Threatened To Curtail Solar Projects.”

Workforce

Volvo To Hire 400 Engineers.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Pollard) reports Volvo announced on Tuesday that it will hire an additional 400 engineers in 2017 to increase its safety technology, autonomous driving, and electrification development initiatives. The company also revealed that it is opening a research and development facility in Sweden, at which it will staff an initial 35 employees in September.

MarketWatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) says Volvo’s new recruits will predominately focus on software development. The article notes that Volvo recently announced its new partnership with Uber as well and is developing autonomous driving pilot projects in both London and China. Additionally, Volvo plans to launch a fully electric vehicle by 2019.

Global Developments

Central Washington University Geologists Receive Grant To Study Earthquakes In Chile.

KNDU-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Yakima, WA (8/30) reports on its website that two Central Washington University geology professors received over a quarter million dollars in grant money from the National Science Foundation “towards a three year research project in Chile, where the professors and some students will study the powerful effects of earthquakes and tsunamis.” Professor Lisa Ely said “that Chile’s earthquake zone is almost a mirror image to the Pacific Northwest’s.” She has traveled to Chile to study these zones scene since 2009 and was present when a massive earthquake struck Chile in 2010. The data she gathers can be used to further “understanding of how and why these earthquakes occur in Chile, and how they could happen here in Washington.”

The Yakima (WA) Herald-Republic Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Guerro) also reports on this story.

Industry News

Drummond’s Departure Heightens Self-Driving Car Rivalry Between Google, Uber.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Cava) reports Google executive David Drummond’s departure from Uber’s board of directors signifies an intensifying rivalry between Google and Uber in the race to develop autonomous driving vehicles. The article says Uber is aggressively pursuing the self-driving car market and has not only recently acquired Otto, but also increased its Advanced Technologies Center staff “with engineers from longtime self-driving car hotbed Carnegie Mellon University.” Meanwhile, Google has suffered “recent high-level departures” from its autonomous car program, including Chris Urmson, the program’s “public face” and “longtime technology lead.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Study: Clean Air Act Upgrade Spurred Strip Mining For Coal.

Greenwire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Brown, Subscription Publication) reports that according to a new study in the journal Environmental Science & Policy, “air pollution regulations have likely played a role in elevated mortality rates near mountaintop-removal coal mining in Appalachia” with mountaintop-removal activity. The study focuses on the “unintended consequences” to central Appalachia of changes to the Clean Air Act. Following Congressional efforts to curb pollution in the 1990s, demand for low-sulfur coal, common deep beneath the mountains of central Appalachia, “exploded.”

US Universities Have Cut Coal Consumption.

Fuel Fix (TX) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) reports that according to the Energy Department, colleges and universities in the US “pushed by rising hopes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, have cut coal consumption by almost two-thirds over the past eight years.” The institutions have “reduced the amount of coal they burn to 700,000 tons in 2015 from 2 million tons in 2008, a dip of 65 percent.” Furthermore, “consumption fell at all 57 institutions that burned coal in 2008.” Twenty schools have “quit using the fossil fuel entirely.” The San Antonio Express-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) also carries this article on its website.

Virginia’s First Community Solar Project To Benefit Western Part Of State.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) reports the “first community solar project” in Virginia will “provide energy” for over “200 homes and businesses in the western part of the state.” According to the office of Gov. Terry McAuliffe “the solar project at the BARC Electric facility allows homes and businesses in different communities to get solar power generated electricity from one place instead of putting panels on their own rooftops.” The project, officials say, will provide a quarter “of the energy needs for homes and businesses across BARC’s electric system in Rockbridge, Bath, Highland, Augusta and Alleghany counties.”

Rhode Island Residents Push Back Against Wind Turbines.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) reports despite the first US offshore wind farm being off its coast, Rhode Island residents “are not so fond of wind turbines sprouting up on land near where they live” and “conventional battles over aesthetics and property values have stymied wind projects” in the state. Compared to “the five-turbine, 30-megawatt offshore wind farm recently completed in blustery state waters and scheduled to switch on this fall,” the state’s “20 land-based wind turbines are more modest generators of energy, with a combined capacity of about 21 megawatts, enough to power more than 6,000 homes.” But the state “is tiny and densely populated” and “people who like the idea of wind energy in the abstract rarely want it near their own backyards, according to a 2014 study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island that found that the turbines don’t hurt property values.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Career & Tech Ed Programs Popular But Difficult To Establish In NY.

Chalkbeat New York Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Disare) reports that as career and technical education migrates into divergent new fields, New York state’s “long and stringent approval process” hinders nascent programs. That process has “raised the quality and rigor of courses to better prepare students for college and career,” according to a state education department spokesperson, but its rigidity impedes schools preparing students for new careers, say critics. The problem is that career paths are evolving and not conducive to a CTE system requiring multiple years for approval. CTE teacher certification is especially difficult. In 2009, the state established a panel to rethink CTE and its goals, with an eye toward preparing graduates for college, and state officials determined in 2014 to allow a technical exam to double as a high school exit exam, but questions remain as to whether CTE should be rethought more radically. Meanwhile, “bureaucratic hurdles” faced by CTE programs have left some foregoing the approval process altogether.

South San Francisco “Science Garage” To Give Students Biotech Lab Experience.

The San Francisco Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30, Colliver) reports that students at El Camino High School in South San Francisco will be afforded real-life laboratory experience on their own campus next year with the establishment of Science Garage, a functioning biotechnology classroom and laboratory. The 6,900 square foot equipped with centrifuges, thermal cyclers, gel electrophoresis machines, and other devises funded with a $7.8 million donation from Genentech Inc.

State Department Tackles Gender Gap In STEM.

Education Week Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/31, Lewis) reports on programs sponsored by the US Department of State engaging girls in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math, where men largely outnumber women worldwide. Among them is “TechGirls,” a summer program which brings students from the Middle East and North Africa to visit tech companies, take part in a coding camp, and engage in service activities – all intended to cultivate their interest in STEM fields. After TechGirls participants return home, their work continues, as the program requires completion of a technology-related project. The State Department also sponsors the WiSci Girls STEAM Camp, which convenes students from around the world for a STEM and art-focused summer camp. “By increasing opportunities for women and girls in the STEM fields, we are getting closer to realizing greater equality for women across the world and widening the pipeline for the next generation of female leaders,” Sarah Shields, the State Department’s program officer for TechGirls, said in an email.

Tuesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

CAS offers complimentary beta access to its organic chemistry learning solution, Chemistry Class Advantage
CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society (ACS), recently announced a complimentary beta version of Chemistry Class Advantage, a new learning solution for undergraduate organic chemistry students. Organised by topics taught in the classroom, Chemistry Class Advantage harnesses the power of SciFinder and research published in journal articles to help teach organic chemistry students to learn chemistry by critically evaluating the research literature.
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Publishers appeal GSU copyright case
The publisher plaintiffs in Cambridge University Press vs. Patton (known commonly as the GSU e-reserves case) have again appealed the case following their second district court loss in eight years of litigation. In an August 26 notice of filing, the publishers confirmed that they will ask the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit in Atlanta to review Judge Orinda Evans’ March 30 verdict against them, as well as ‘all prior orders and rulings’ in the closely watched copyright case, which involves the use of digitised course readings, known as e-reserves, common on college campuses.
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BioOne announces new partnerships, titles for 2017
BioOne has announced content partnerships with Canadian Science Publishing, CSIRO Publishing of Australia, and the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, which together will enhance the full-text aggregation BioOne Complete with nine journals in 2017. With these sterling additions, BioOne Complete will now include 200 high impact titles from leading non-profit scientific publishers worldwide.
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Winners of 2016 ACS Nano Lectureship Award announced
The American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) Publications Division has announced three scientists as winners of the 2016 ACS Nano Lectureship Award for outstanding contributions to the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This year’s award winners are Dr. Lifeng Chi, Dr. Christopher Murray, and Dr. Andrea Ferrari; each has been selected for exceptional research that embodies the journal’s mission to advance the field through new discoveries.
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ACCUCOMS to represent F1000 in Israel, Saudi Arabia, UAE and Oman
ACCUCOMS, a provider of sales and representation services for publishers, has signed a new agreement for the representation of F1000 in Israel, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Oman. F1000 is a publisher of services for life scientists and clinical researchers. The organisation’s three main services for scientists and researchers include F1000Prime, F1000Workspace and F1000Research.
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Editage launches new video service for researchers
Editage, the flagship brand of Cactus Communications (CACTUS), has announced the launch of its new video service for researchers. Called Editage Video Summaries, the service is available in 2 forms—as video summaries that tell the full research story in 3-4 minutes, and as video teasers that introduce scientific research to a broad audience in 1-2 minutes.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Maryland Officials Fine Power Plant Owners Companies For Polluting State Rivers.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports the owners of two Maryland power plants “have agreed to pay a $1 million penalty to resolve allegations over polluting in the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers.” On Monday the agreement was announced by the Maryland Department of the Environment. According to the department GenOn Mid Atlantic and NRG Chalk Point operate the Dickerson Electric Generation Station and Chalk Point Electric Generating Station and the two companies “will perform $1 million in environmental projects and upgrade wastewater treatment technologies at the coal-burning facilities.” The Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports the plants “were found to have violated the Clean Water Act from 2010 to 2013.” As the facilities cut “more nitrogen from their emissions into the air, they were discharging more of the harmful nutrient in their wastewater, state environmental officials said.” The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Nirappil) reports State Attorney General Brian E. Frosh said, “The Chesapeake Bay is dying a death of a thousand cuts, or, more appropriately, a million cuts. … When someone fails to abide by the law, we will hold them accountable.”

Higher Education

Morgan State Dean Credited With Educating Black Engineers In Baltimore.

David Wilson, president of Morgan State University, writes at the Baltimore Sun Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) that Eugene M. DeLoatch, dean of the school’s Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. School of Engineering in Baltimore since its founding more than 30 years ago, “is credited with producing more black engineers than any other individual in the history of American higher education.” Wilson says DeLoatch “set about recruiting faculty members and put in place initiatives such as an effective pre-college summer transition program to ensure that students began their college careers on strong footing.” He also “worked to develop special courses for teaching introductory subjects such as mathematics and physics in innovative ways.” Wilson explains that DeLoatch served as the first African-American president of the American Society for Engineering Education in 2002 and 2003. Wilson says Deloatch retired in June and that during his career he “produced a large cadre of graduates who will undoubtedly continue to serve the state of Maryland and the nation uncommonly well.”

Stanford University Restricts Drone Use Over Campus.

The San Jose (CA) Mercury News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Kelly) reports Stanford University has banned the use of drones over the campus by anyone not a member of the Stanford community. In a news release, Stanford said the use of drones could endanger helicopters bringing critically injured patients to its two hospitals, and also raise “privacy and other safety issues.” Stanford faculty, students, and staff must seek approval from the University before conducting drone flights. The University uses drones for research in “a wide range of technologies important to infrastructure inspection, agricultural monitoring and various humanitarian applications.”

ITT Stops All Enrollment.

The Indianapolis Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that ITT Technical Institute has now ended all student enrollment, noting that the move follows in the wake of ED’s “decision last week to ban ITT from enrolling new students who depended on federal loans to pay for classes.” Most ITT students receive Federal aid, but the school “could have continued accepting new students outside of the government’s Title IV program.” The Star reports that the firm’s “future has been in question since the Education Department announced its sanctions amid an Obama administration crackdown on for-profit colleges.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that the firm announced the move on its website on Monday, in said in an email “the company has ‘voluntarily suspended new student enrollment as we assess our options.’” The AP notes that ITT “has been the subject of state and federal investigations focusing on its recruiting and accounting practices.”

Noting that the firm “operates more than 130 ITT Technical Institute campuses in 38 states,” the Indianapolis Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that the firm “was hit hard” by last week’s sanctions from ED, “made after ITT fell out of compliance with its accreditor’s standards and ‘put its students and millions of dollars in taxpayer-funded federal student aid at risk.’”

WSJournal: Administration Policies Will Force For-Profit Colleges Into Bankruptcy.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Subscription Publication) editorializes that the Administration would like to put as many for-profit colleges as possible out of business. The decision last week by the Education Department to deny ITT Technical Institute federal financial aid funds sends a signal to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and state attorneys general to vigorously investigate ITT and other for-profit colleges. The Journal is worried that the Administration’s policy could force ITT into bankruptcy, which would mean that current ITT students would be left with significant debt but no college degree. Additionally, taxpayers would be liable for any student-debt relief in the wake of an ITT bankruptcy.

Threatening Emails Under Virginia Tech Police Investigation.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that “a threatening email message” has been sent to “dozens of people” at Virginia Tech, and according to Tech Police Chief Kevin Foust, the similar messages were sent to other schools, although he was vague on the specifics of the threat and did not identify the other schools. Anyone with information regarding the threat is being asked to contact the police.

Report Blames Servicers For Issues With Income Driven Student Loan Repayment Programs.

The Street Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Sandman) reports that according to a report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), “servicer delays as a big reason for income-driven repayment sign-up fails, and recommends speeding up this process. When applications languish, income and other data used to support them becomes out of date.”

From ASEE
ABET Update
The Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) Criteria Committee met in Baltimore last month to continue reviewing the EAC Criteria 3 and 5 Proposal. After spending months categorizing, summarizing, and evaluating each one of the hundreds of comments, the committee has taken that feedback into consideration and made a number of modifications to the content of the proposal.

The Engineering Area Delegation will review the proposal in late October, as it has the final approval authority for these proposed changes. The Delegation has three options: approve the proposed criteria as written and implement, delay final approval for one year and seek additional public comment, or reject the proposal.  More details are here.


Envisioning the Future of the Maker Movement
A new report from ASEE on this important development in engineering education.


Sustainable Development Primer for Higher Education Presidents, Chancellors, Trustees and Senior Leaders
This new primer describes the sustainability related, crucial roles and tasks for presidents, trustees, and senior leadership and explains how sustainability is a robust national trend in higher education

Research and Development

Simulated “Mars Mission” Crew Emerges After 365 Days.

NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Hersher) reports in its “The Two-way” blog that “after 365 days, the longest mission in project history, six crew members exited their Mars simulation habitat on slopes of Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii on Sunday.” NPR explains that “the crew lived in isolation in a geodesic dome set in a Mars-like environment as part of the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s fourth Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS, project.” The report points out that “a committee of space experts chooses crew members they describe as ‘astronaut-like,’ and the candidate criteria include an undergraduate degree in science or engineering, at least three years of research experience or graduate study, and mental and physical strength.” The crew included a German physicist, “a NASA physician, a hydrologist from Montana, an MIT-trained engineer and pilot, a French astrobiologist and an architecture student from Tongji University in Shanghai.”

JWC Founder Warns Maritime, Offshore Industries To Take Cybersecurity Seriously.

In an editorial for Maritime Executive Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29), Jordan Wylie Founder and Principal Consultant at JWC International Ltd, asserts the vulnerabilities of an ever-increasing reliance on information and communications technology (ICT) extend to the maritime and offshore industries. Detailing recent research JWC “conducted with the Company Security Officers (CSO) Alliance and Coventry University,” Wylie explains that “more than half of the [HSSE] personnel questioned did not believe cyber was a security or safety issue” and “many organisations…did not implement cyber or ICT usage policies or procedures,” a finding that was “more prevalent in the shipping industry and less so in the offshore oil and gas sector” – though “still significant.” According to Wylie, increasingly interconnected systems are creating “more vulnerable junctions within the system” that hackers could exploit to cause a catastrophic “operational shut down.” He warns, “cyber security is a threat that needs to be taken more seriously and management need to take responsibility sooner rather than later.”

DARPA Using EW Systems To Thwart Future Enemies.

Defense News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Insinna) reports the US military is working to develop “new electronic warfare technologies that, in real time, use artificial intelligence” to scramble enemy systems “using never-before-seen frequencies and waveforms.” These “cognitive electronic warfare” systems remain in early stages of development, but researchers at Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency say the tech could debut on the battlefield within the next decade. Yiftach Eisenberg, deputy director of DARPA’s microsystems technology office, said the military’s approach – studying enemy systems to discover vulnerabilities to exploit – “has worked well for us in the past when the adversaries systems were relatively stable.” However, a “fundamental shift” in recent years has prompted researchers to look for new ways to “respond to new threats, new waveforms that those systems are using that we haven’t anticipated. … If things are changing quickly, then we need systems that can respond in similar timeframes to enable us to protect our aircraft.”

Southwest Research Institute Leading DOE-backed Clean Coal Power Pilot Project Planning.

The San Antonio Express-News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that San Antonio’s Southwest Research Institute announced it’s taking the helm of a $3.3 million project to plan a coal oxy-combustion pilot power plant. Oxy-fuel combustion “uses pure oxygen instead of air to burn the coal and generate electricity” burning less coal, and emitting water and carbon dioxide which can be sequestered. Other project partners include Italy’s ITEA, Houston-based Jacobs Energy, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The project is being funded by the US Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

3-D Printed Tool Developed At ORNL Achieves Guinness World Records Title.

Science Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports “a 3D printed trim-and-drill tool,” developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers “to be evaluated at The Boeing Company, has received the title of largest solid 3D printed item by GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS.” At an awards ceremony at DOE’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at the lab, “where the component was 3D printed on the lab’s Big Area Additive Manufacturing machine, GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS judge Michael Empric measured the trim tool, proved it exceeded the required minimum of 0.3 cubic meters, or approximately 10.6 cubic feet, and announced the new record title.” ORNL’s polymer materials development team leader Vlastimil Kunc said, “The recognition by GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS draws attention to the advances we’re making in large-scale additive manufacturing composites research. … Using 3D printing, we could design the tool with less material and without compromising its function.” The Chattanooga (TN) Times Free Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/30) also covers the feat.

Global Developments

Russia Announces Test Of Pulse-Detonation Rocket Engine.

The Daily Mail Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, MacDonald) reports the Russian Advanced Research Foundation has “announced the construction and testing of a pulse-detonation rocket engine,” which uses detonation waves to combust fuel and oxidizer. According to the researchers, such an engine could allow rockets to carry a heavier payload, reducing the cost of shipping cargo into orbit. The Daily Mail reports the US is involved in the development of pulse-detonation engines as well, and tested such an engine in 2008 through the US Air Force Research Laboratory.

Industry News

Apple Watch 2 Could Add Longer Lasting Battery.

Business Insider Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Leswing) reports that among the new features expected from the next Apple Watch, a more durable, longer-lasting battery is expected to be one of them. Speaking to the possibility, Apple head of software engineering Craig Federighi said, “It turns out that when we first were coming out with watchOS we were being really conservative about understanding how people were going to be using the Watch and trying to make sure we could hit our goal of very solid all-day battery life. So that you could use it all day and charge it at night. And we found that we actually really overshot the goal, which was an area of just massive focus and paranoia through the release.”

Verizon Announces Launch Of LTE Advanced Network.

Business Insider Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports Verizon on Monday is launching its new high-speed cellular data network, LTE Advanced. Verizon said the network is up to 50 percent faster than its existing standard 4G LTE network. SlashGear Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) says Verizon rolled LTE Advanced, or LTE-A, in 461 US cities not only in urban areas, but also in rural regions. Verizon said the service is available to 288 million of its consumers. The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Kastrenakes) notes that Verizon has slowly introduced its LTE Advanced in increments. Verizon communications director Kelly Crummey said the company has been “lighting up markets as recently as the last few days.” Consumers can only use the network with phones that support the technology.

BGR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Mills) explains Verizon will send and receive packets on several channels at once through a process dubbed “carrier aggregation,” with two-channel aggregation providing speeds of 225Mbps and three-channel aggregation providing speeds exceeding 300Mbps. PC Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Segan) says phones capable of offering LTE-A speeds in two-carrier aggregation markets are called “Category 6” phones, and phones compatible with three-carrier aggregation markets are called “Category 9” phones. The article says Verizon is essentially offering faster speeds for everyone, with 200Mbps three-carrier aggregation speeds “in sight for everyone.”

Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) adds that according to BTIG Research analyst Walt Piecyk, “It’s nice to have super fast speeds at random cell sites but if the consumer is handed off to less spectrum intensive LTE or 3G as they walk down the street, the consumer could be disappointed.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Anti-Fracking Initiatives Will Not Be On Colorado Ballot.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that environmental groups have failed to gather sufficient signatures to put two measures on the November ballot in Colorado that aim to curb hydraulic fracturing and natural gas work, the state said Monday. Proponents of the initiatives gathered more than the 98,492 signatures required to put the questions on the ballot, but failed to gather enough to offset the number that would possibly be rejected during a random sampling examining the validity of the signatures. Proponents of the measures have 30 days to appeal the decision.

Analysis: North Dakota Pipeline Protests Draw Attention To Tribal Issues.

An 1,800-word analysis in the High Country (CO) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Wiles) reports that protests to the Dakota Access Pipeline in Cannon Ball, ND are drawing attention to a “long history of battles between Native American communities…and extractive industry and the federal government.” Tribes assert the proposed use of the land is part of a “long-term pattern” of the US taking Native American land and polluting waterways. The piece also says the protests “illustrate a new era of direct action enabled by social media,” as activists are able to more easily spread their message.

Additional coverage of the pipeline was provided by the Wenatchee (WA) World Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29), Yes! Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29),DeSmogBlog Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29), and AlterNet Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29).

Tribes Protest Natural Gas Pipeline Under Lake Sakakawea.

A 1,000-word report in the Billings (MT) Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Dalrymple) says Paradigm Energy Partners “is installing two pipelines under Lake Sakakawea that will be owned by Sacagawea Pipeline Co.” MHA Nation protested construction of the natural gas pipeline under the lake, but Paradigm sought and was granted “a temporary restraining order to prevent the tribe from halting construction, arguing it has the regulatory approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.” Paradigm asserted “the Sacagawea Pipeline system will reduce truck traffic and reduce natural gas flaring in areas where pipeline capacity is limited.” The Billings Gazette adds that “the Tribal Business Council supported the Sacagawea Pipeline system in an April 2015 resolution, finding it in the best interest of the tribe to grant a right-of-way for the project.”

Raytheon Wins Contract To Provide US Navy MK 54 Lightweight Torpedoes.

The Military Embedded Systems Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Iriarte) reports Naval Sea Systems Command officials have awarded Raytheon a $37,723,774 contract to “provide MK 54 lightweight torpedo common parts kits; MK 54 Mod 0 lightweight torpedo kits; and MK 54 exercise fuel tanks including spares, production support material, engineering support, and hardware repair support.” If all of the contract options are exercised, the value could reach $448,737,790. Work on the contract is reportedly expected to conclude by May 2019 “and will be performed in Keyport, Washington; Portsmouth, Rhode Island; and Tewksbury, Massachusetts.”

According to RTT News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29), the 98% of the contract purchase is destined for the US Navy, while the remaining 2% are for the Government of Thailand under the Foreign Military Sales Program.

The MK 54, which UPI Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Ziezulewicz) reports was formerly named the Lightweight Hybrid Torpedo, “integrates existing torpedo hardware and software from past torpedo programs with state-of-the-art commercial, off-the-shelf digital signal processing technology, the Navy said.” It can be deployed from surface ships, helicopters, or “fixed-wing aircraft to track, classify and attack underwater targets, Raytheon said.”

Seeking Alpha Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Minkoff) offers brief coverage of the contract details.

DOE Proposing Water Heater Efficiency Rule.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Devaney) reports the Energy Department is “proposing new efficiency rules for water heaters.” The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at DOE announced yesterday that “a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking that would ‘establish a mathematical conversion factor to translate the current energy conservation standards.’” Commercial and consumer water heaters would fall under the efficiency rule. The public will have a chance to comment for the next 30 days.

DC Gets Renewable Energy To Meet Mandate From Out Of State.

The Washington Examiner Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports that according to the Department of Energy, Washington DC gets the majority of its renewable energy from states as far away as Indiana because the city isn’t able to “produce much on its own.” Approximately “half of the power plants that can meet the District of Columbia’s renewable energy mandate are in Illinois, Indiana and Pennsylvania, the Energy Information Administration…said Monday.” EIA said the city is reaching its renewable energy mandate target “by buying credits and paying millions of dollars in what are essentially fines for not having enough renewables on hand to generate electricity with, according the EIA analysis.” In 2015, “electricity sales totaled 11.3 billion kilowatt hours, with the mandate of 12 percent of that coming from renewable energy,” the EIA said. “Because D.C. has limited renewable capacity, almost all of the … compliance targets were met by generation outside of the District through the purchase of renewable energy credits.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

New STEM Academy Replaces Campostella Elementary School In Norfolk.

WVEC-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Hampton Roads, VA (8/29, Zverjako) reports that on Monday, the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella opened. According to WVEC-TV, “The facility is just one of five new schools that will be opening up in the city within the next two years. It is equipped with specialized classrooms, media and nature centers, and students even will have access to a 3-D printer.” The new school will serve students in K-8, and replaces Campostella Elementary School.

Utah Elementary School Teacher Trains To Be Astronaut Over Summer Vacation.

The Deseret (UT) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29, Benson) reports that E.G. King Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Tami Pandoff, spent a week at the US Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama, training “to be an astronaut through the Honeywell Educators at Space Academy program.”

Monday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Brill celebrates 333rd anniversary at 23rd Beijing International Book Fair
Academic publisher Brill celebrated its 333rd year anniversary at the 23rd Beijing International Book Fair (August 24 – 28). Several key events took place that are of strategic importance to Brill’s presence and growth in China. The festive Brill reception held on August 24 was opened by Long Xiao, Deputy Director, Peking University Library.
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BioMed Central expands BMC-series portfolio with the launch of BMC Zoology
Open access publisher BioMed Central recently launched BMC Zoology, a new open access, peer-reviewed journal within the BMC series. BMC Zoology will increase and disseminate zoological knowledge through the publication of original research, methodology, database, software and debate articles. All launch articles are openly and freely available on the journal website.
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Celebrating 45 years of WorldCat
WorldCat, the world’s most comprehensive database of information about library collections, recently celebrated the 45th anniversary of its launch. On August 26, 1971, the OCLC Online Union Catalog (now known as WorldCat) began operation. From a single terminal, cataloguers at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, were able to catalogue 133 books online that day. Today, WorldCat comprises more than 380 million records representing more than 2.4 billion titles in libraries worldwide.
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RCNi partners with Impelsys to launch native mobile apps to aid RCNi Learning
RCNi, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Royal College of Nursing, has announced a partnership with Impelsys to launch native mobile apps to support their online learning platform, RCNi Learning. The apps that are now live on iOS App Store and Google play Store will allow users to access the learning resources and sync their progress across all devices seamlessly.
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First Databank Europe launches Web API Solution for fast, reliable, and secure access to FDB Multilex
First Databank Europe (FDB), part of the Hearst Health network and one of the leading providers of clinical drug knowledge that assists to improve medication-related decisions and patient outcomes, has launched a web API version of solution FDB Multilex. The launch supports NHS England’s directive as part of the interoperability charter for all hospitals to be paperless at the point of care by 2020.
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Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Phil Davis (Scientific Reports On Track To Become Largest Journal In The World); Jian Wang, Reinhilde Veugelers and Paula Stephan (Bias against novelty in science: A cautionary tale for users of bibliometric indicators); David Matthews (eLife reveals publication costs to spark debate on journal prices); Scott McLemee (Increase Scholarly Visibility Using This One Weird Trick!) and William Kowalski (Crowd Funding a New Path to Publishing?). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Native Americans Protesting In North Dakota In Hopes Of Halting Major Oil Pipeline.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Yardley) reports Native Americans across the US have been arriving “at the confluence of the Cannonball and Missouri rivers” in order “to protest what they say is one indignity too many in a history that has included extermination and exploitation.” The efforts center around the 1,100-mile, $3.7 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline that would “could carry more than 400,000 barrels of crude oil a day from the Bakken region of western North Dakota” to existing pipelines, a project that the lawyers for the Standing Rock Sioux “say” would “damage ancestral sites of the Standing Rock Sioux and put the tribe’s water supply at risk.” The Times states that Judge James A. Boasberg of United States District Court is currently deciding on whether “to stop construction” of the Energy Transfer Partners’ pipeline project “and reconsider permits the project has received.”

AP Profiles Native Americans Protesting The Dakota Access Pipeline. The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Macpherson) profiles some of the “Native Americans from reservations hundreds of miles away from North Dakota” that have traveled to the North Dakota and “joined the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s growing protest against” the Dakota Access pipeline that is set to stretch across Iowa, Illinois, North Dakota and South Dakota. The actions of the protesters, who say the project “could disturb sacred sites and impact drinking water for 8,000 tribal members and millions further downstream,” has led to about 30 arrests and a temporary stop in construction.

Study Suggests Biofuels Could Hurt Environment More Than Gasoline. The Christian Science Monitor Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Lindsay) examines whether biofuels are more environmentally friendly than gasoline following a study by the University of Michigan Energy Institute (UMEI) has found that “corn ethanol and biodiesel biofuels may be more environmentally damaging than petroleum gasoline.” While the study found that the quick growth of corn and soybean crop used in biofuels means they are unable to offset the “emissions that occur when the biofuels like ethanol and biodiesel are burned,” indicating the process is not carbon neutral. However, Harvard geology professor Daniel Schrag “argues” that this information is based on a “flawed premise” because “biofuels don’t have to be carbon neutral to be an environmentally preferable alternative to petroleum gasoline.”

NYTimes Considers Fight Over Dakota Access Pipeline. In a nearly 900-word analysis, the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Healy, Subscription Publication) examines “how the battle over” the 1,170-mile Dakota Access pipeline “has become an environmental and cultural flash point, stirring passion across the Plains and drawing hundreds of protesters to camp out in rural North Dakota.” Earlier this week, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe “asked a [Federal] judge to halt construction” of the pipeline, arguing that “a leak or spill could be ruinous” to their tribe. The Times states that the federal and state agencies “have approved the pipeline,” and some local residents are welcoming moneys that come via use of their lands. However, despite pipeline companies’ assertions that pipelines are “far safer to move oil and natural gas in an underground pipe than in rail cars or trucks,” “pipeline spills and ruptures occur regularly, sometimes in small leaks and sometimes in catastrophic gushers.”

Higher Education

ED’s Moves Against ITT Pave Way For Students To Seek Loan Forgiveness.

The Indianapolis Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Briggs) reports that ED’s “aggressive actions against the for-profit” ITT Technical Institute could greatly benefit former students because the moves “have laid a foundation for past students to take advantage of a little-known rule, called defense to repayment, that can wipe out their loans.” The piece explains that ED has “broad discretion to forgive student loans for borrowers who claim they were defrauded or that their college violated state laws.”

The Columbus (OH) Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) reports that the “triple whammy of penalties from the federal government could put ITT Technical Institute schools out of business, meaning hundreds of central Ohioans would have to find new schools and make sure they’re not stuck with useless student loans.” The article describes how state officials are working to help students “transfer to other schools if necessary.” The piece explains that ED “announced Thursday that, because of long-unresolved allegations of financial wrongdoing and other problems, it no longer would allow ITT schools to enroll new students with federal Title IV loans.”

The Christian Science Monitor Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28) and the Cleveland Plain Dealer Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) run general continuing coverage of the ITT sanctions.

Veterans Group Says Loophole Could Keep Student Veterans From Being Reimbursed. Stars And Stripes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(8/26) reports that the advocacy group Student Veterans of America says a “loophole” will prevent “12,500 student veterans from seeking lost benefits” if ITT collapses. The piece explains that according to the group “a loophole in how GI Bill benefits are counted as federal aid means student veterans will not be able to recoup benefits even if civilian students see their debts forgiven.”

California Bars ITT From Enrolling New Students. The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) reports that the California Department of Consumer Affairs’ Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education has banned ITT “from accepting new students at its 15 California locations under an emergency decision.” The order came a day after ED’s decision to block Federal aid to the school’s students. The piece quotes Education Secretary John King saying, “It simply would not be responsible or in the best interest of students to allow ITT to continue enrolling new students who rely on federal financial aid.”

ITT Shares Plummet After ED Sanctions. The Indianapolis Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) reports that the firm’s shares “went into a freefall Friday,” falling 64% on the news that ED “banned the Carmel-based for-profit educator from enrolling new students who receive federal aid.” The piece notes that ITT’s stock “has lost 85 percent of its value since the beginning of the year.”

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Blue) reports the firm “is reeling Friday from what could be a final blow,” noting that the “stock fell into penny-stock territory after the Department of Education said it can no longer enroll students with federal loans.”

Pell Grant Program Removes Dual Enrollment Barriers.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) reports that along with 42 other universities and colleges, Jackson State University and Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College are taking part in a new federal program that allows 10,000 high school students across the country to use Pell Grants for dual enrollment courses.

Regulators Put Pressure On Student Loan Servicers To Treat Borrowers Better.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Carrns, Subscription Publication) reports Federal regulators this summer “have stepped up pressure” on student loan servicers to start treating “borrowers better.” The Times says the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is now looking into servicers that handle both private and Federal loans, with the bureau’s ombudsman for student loans, Seth Frotman, saying that a midyear report shows “borrowers often complained that federal loan servicers make it difficult for them to enroll in special programs that can lower their monthly payments on federal loans based on how much money they earn.” Consumers Union lawyer Suzanne Martindale criticized that servicers are “dropping the ball.”

Crackdown On For-Profit Colleges May Leave Taxpayers Liable For Student Loan Discharges.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28, Cohen, Subscription Publication) reports in an analysis that the Administration’s decision last week to bar ITT Educational Services – one of the nation’s largest operators of for-profit college – from using federal financial aid to enroll new students is an important step in the “crackdown on for-profit schools that have vacuumed up billions of dollars in government grants and loans but failed to deliver on promised training and jobs.” But the decision creates new problems by making taxpayers liable for “relieving current and former students saddled with onerous debt.” Current ITT students have been left with few options. If ITT is forced to close, current students can apply to the Department of Education for a loan discharge.

More Students Choosing Coding Boot Camps Over College.

CNBC Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27) reports that “for many prospective students looking for a quick route to a six-figure salary at a big tech firm, coding camps have become attractive alternatives to colleges and grad schools.” Programs run by schools such as Hack Reactor, are providing students with these alternatives. The program, which costs $20,000, “boasts a 98 percent job placement rate among its graduates, who land jobs at prestigious tech companies such as Google, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft” with an average beginning pay of $105,000 a year. In response to criticism that the program is not a replacement for a four-your college education, Hack Reactor co-founder Shawn Drost said, “I think people underestimate how much you can learn in a short time frame. …You can really compare and contrast the difference between different modes of learning. If you’ve ever taken a language class in high school and college versus actually going to that country and immersing yourself, it’s incredible.”

From ASEE
ABET Update
The Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) Criteria Committee met in Baltimore last month to continue reviewing the EAC Criteria 3 and 5 Proposal. After spending months categorizing, summarizing, and evaluating each one of the hundreds of comments, the committee has taken that feedback into consideration and made a number of modifications to the content of the proposal.

The Engineering Area Delegation will review the proposal in late October, as it has the final approval authority for these proposed changes. The Delegation has three options: approve the proposed criteria as written and implement, delay final approval for one year and seek additional public comment, or reject the proposal.  More details are here.


Envisioning the Future of the Maker Movement
A new report from ASEE on this important development in engineering education.


Sustainable Development Primer for Higher Education Presidents, Chancellors, Trustees and Senior Leaders
This new primer describes the sustainability related, crucial roles and tasks for presidents, trustees, and senior leadership and explains how sustainability is a robust national trend in higher education

Research and Development

Energy Department To Provide $40 Million Funding For Wave Energy Research.

Salon Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Stopyra) reports that the Department of Energy is providing funding of up to $40 million “to develop of the nation’s first open-water wave-energy-testing facility in a location to be determined.” However, critics believe that wave energy will not surpass solar or wind.

USD Receives NSF Grant To Replace Supercomputer.

The Sioux City (IA) Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28, Nelson) reports that the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a $504,911 major research instrumentation grant to the University of South Dakota to replace the current campus supercomputer. According to the Journal, the NSF “identified supercomputing systems as necessary research instruments, alongside equipment like DNA sequencers and electron microscopes.”

NASA Mars Simulation Experiment Participants Exit Dome After One Year.

BBC News (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/29) reports a team of six individuals completed a Mars simulation in Hawaii, where they lived inside a dome “without fresh air, fresh food, or privacy” for one year. The team consisted of French astro-biologist, a German physicist and “four Americans – a pilot, an architect, a journalist and a soil scientist.”

UPI Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28, Cone) reports the experiment was part of the NASA-funded Hawaii Space Exploration Analogue and Simulation (HI-SEAS) program, implemented in coordination with the University of Hawaii. German physicist and engineer Christiane Heinicke said in an interview, “Right now I am super excited. It’s the first time [I] get to be outside without a space suit. Everything is different.”

Analysts Address Possible Autonomous Car Security Issues.

In a Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27) online video, Rapid7 transportation security director Craig Smith told correspondent Emily Chang that security threats to autonomous cars will likely be data-driven risks. Smith explained that while autonomous vehicles do face some security risks, those risks are no more dangerous than existing risks associated with older vehicles subject to human error. Smith added that the ability to update security flaws over “airwaves” will also prevent the need for “big, costly recalls.”

Bugcrowd senior systems engineer Kevin Tighe told The Guardian (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28) that as car manufacturers migrate to the self-driving vehicle market, they “are finally realizing that what they sell is just a big computer you sit in.” Tighe said the realization is reassuring because major automobile manufacturers are understanding their responsibilities to consumers and treating vehicle security seriously. For industry experts, hacking conferences like Defcon and Black Hat facilitate autonomous vehicle hacking to expose existing flaws so manufacturers can address issues before malicious hackers exploit those flaws in real-world situations.

Semiconductor Industry’s Focus May Pivot To Self-Driving Car Market.

Venture Beat Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28, Takahashi) reports tech companies, auto manufacturers, and ride-sharing services entering the self-driving car market could lead the $330 billion semiconductor chip industry “in a new technical direction.” Tirias Research analyst Kevin Krewell claimed deep-learning car navigation technology is “the leading driver” for semiconductor chips because it incorporates “a new work load that is not the same as other high-performance computing workloads.” Venture Beat adds that self-driving cars will introduce artificial intelligence and computer vision breakthroughs that critically rely on “an awful lot of processing power.” Google hardware engineer Daniel Rosenband revealed that Google’s next-generation prototype, for example, may need chips capable of delivering 50 teraops of performance.

Global Developments

NYTimes A1: Italy’s Anti-Seismic Codes Challenge Reconstruction Of Ancient Architecture.

On its front page, the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Pianigiani, Povoledo, Subscription Publication) says seismologists from Italy’s Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology arrived at the earthquake zone on Friday to analyze the destruction and determine what buildings may be too expensive to repair under Italy’s anti-seismic codes. Engineer and historic building preservation expert Donatella Guzzoni said because about 60 percent of Italy’s buildings are believed to be over 100 years old, ancient structures cannot be expected to “adhere to norms designed for modern structures, but you can try to improve them, that’s the path to take with the objective to save human lives.” Guzzoni added, “Italy has the best technologies to do this,” but the decision to restore “does come down to money.”

Industry News

NYTimes A1: GM Airbag Supplier First Informed Auto Industry Of Safety Risks In Takata Airbags Two Decades Ago.

Revelations on the front page of the New York Times point to an automotive industry that was aware of extreme safety flaws in cheaper airbags made by Takata Corp. as early as the late 1990s. The story raises doubt over the enforceability of product specifications largely agreed by on by the industry itself, with little regulatory oversight, citing sources connected to General Motors’ decision to switch airbag suppliers and former NHTSA administrator Joan Claybrook. The airbags at the center of the Takata recalls have killed and injured over 100 people and led to the largest auto safety recall in US history.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, A1, Tabuchi, Subscription Publication) reports that “in the late 1990s” GM first asked its then airbag supplier, Autoliv, “to match the cheaper design” of airbags made by Takata “or risk losing the automaker’s business.” Autoliv tests, however, overwhelmingly concluded that the lifesaving devices transformed into shrapnel bombs in certain climate conditions. Moreover, the United States Council on Automotive Research, an industry consortium that sets design and performance specifications, updated its airbag guidance reflecting the accepted dangers of using ammonium nitrate inflaters in high-humidity environments. “The problem,” the Times reports, “is that no one enforced the specifications,” a fact that “points to the self-regulatory nature of automotive manufacturing.” Another story for the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Subscription Publication) reports on what car owners can do if their vehicle is affected by the Takata recall.

Volkswagen Expected To Pay $1.2 Billion To US Dealerships Over Emissions Scandal.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Randazzo, Bach, Subscription Publication) reports the approximately 650 Volkswagen franchise dealerships in the US appear to have reached an agreement with the automaker over its emission scandal that would have the company pay a total of $1.2 billion to the dealers, according to a source familiar with the matter. The deal, though not finalized, would also include buy backs of used, unfixable diesel vehicles that remain at dealership lots.

NYTimes Analysis: GE Moving To Become Top Software Company.

A more than 2,500-word New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Lohr, Subscription Publication) reports on a software center opened by GE in 2011 in San Ramon, California, which today is seeking to build an industrial-scale computer operating system, which the Times refers to as “a Microsoft Windows or Google Android for factories and industrial equipment.” According to the Times, CEO Jeffrey Immelt has say the project will make GE a “top 10 software company” by the year 2020, yet it also notes that some are skeptical in Silicon Valley. Technology entrepreneur Thomas M. Siebel said, “GE is trying to do this the way a big company does, by throwing thousands of people and billions of dollars at it…But they’re not software people.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Biden Announces $2.45 Billion Loan For Amtrak Upgrades In Northeast Corridor.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Chase) reports Vice President Biden joined Amtrak officials and Deputy Transportation Secretary Victor Mendez on Friday in announcing a $2.45 billion Federal loan to Amtrak “to buy new trains, upgrade tracks and make platform improvements along the busy Northeast corridor, the largest such loan ever by the Department of Transportation.” Speaking at the Wilmington, Delaware, station named after him, Biden said, “You can’t make this country work without rail. … This is a really, really sound investment.” Amtrak board chairman Anthony Coscia added, “We’re making the most significant investment in passenger rail that’s ever been made in this country.”

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Shear, Subscription Publication) reports the loan will allow “for the purchase of state-of-the-art trains to replace the aging Acela trains that use the Northeast Corridor from Washington to Boston.” According to the Times, “while the new trains will not approach the speeds of some Asian and European trains, officials said they hoped that the new Acela would travel at 160 miles per hour in some places, up from 135 m.p.h. now.” The Times quotes Vice President Biden asserting, “We need these kinds of investments to keep this region – and our whole country – moving, and to create new jobs.”

Amtrak Threatens To Cut From Boston Rail Service To New York, DC. The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Dungca) reports Amtrak “is threatening to cut rail service from Boston to New York and Washington, D.C., because of an ongoing legal dispute with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority over who should pay for maintenance on a part of the Northeast Corridor, according to a court filing this week.” The Globe describes the threat as “the latest salvo in an increasingly contentious lawsuit filed by the MBTA in January.”

Proposed Rulemaking Would Limit Top Speeds For Commercial Vehicles Over 26,000 Pounds.

There is extensive pickup of wire stories on the joint proposal from NHTSA and FMCSA to require speed-limiting devices in all trucks, buses, and large vehicles in order to reduce traffic accidents and fuel consumption. A number of other print dailies and industry publications also had coverage, which focuses on the divided response from the industry, with the American Trucking Association taking the side of regulators that speed limits for large vehicles are necessary and the Owner Operator Independent Drivers Association deriding the rules as unnecessary and potentially unsafe. Reuters and the Charlotte Observer highlighted Transportation Secretary Foxx’s assertion that the safety benefits from the regulation would be “significant.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Krisher) reports that the proposal announced Friday would affect “newly made U.S. vehicles that weigh more than 26,000 pounds,” with regulators “considering a cap of 60, 65, or 68 mph, that that could change.” According to the AP, regulators are also “considering” forcing even older vehicles to install electronic speed limiters, with the support of nonprofits like Roadsafe America, although “NHTSA said retrofitting vehicles made after 1990 with the speed-limiting technology could be too costly … anywhere from $100 to $2,000 per vehicle.” Although the American Trucking Association also backs the proposal for all new vehicles, OOIDA says its 157,000 members are safer when their trucks are able to travel at the speed of traffic.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) reports that Foxx said “There are significant safety benefits to this proposed rulemaking,” in addition to “fuel and emissions savings.” ATA endorses a speed limit of 65 mph for trucks, the story says, but “the maximum allowable speed would be decided after the agency receives public input” over the 60-day comment period. A briefer report by Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26) has similar coverage.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Zanona) reports that NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind stated, “Even small increases in speed have large effects on the force of impact,” so a speed limit for “heavy vehicles makes sense for safety and the environment.” ATA President and CEO Chris Spear said his organization is “pleased NHTSA and FMCSA have, almost 10 years after we first petitioned them, released this proposal to mandate the electronic limiting of commercial vehicle speeds.”

In a story headlined “Anthony Foxx Backs Proposal to Put Speed Limiting Devices on New US Trucks and Buses,” the Charlotte (NC) Observer Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26, Marusak) reports on Foxx’s support for the proposal, which the Transportation Secretary called “a win for safety, energy conservation and our environment.” Pointing out that Charlotte, North Carolina is a logistics hub, the story takes comment from a truck driver but frames the debate around OOIDA’s argument.

Japanese Government Pledges $2 Million For Baltimore-Washington Maglev Feasibility Study.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Calvert, Subscription Publication) reports that the government of Japan pledged $2 million to Maryland for a feasibility study to research a maglev high-speed rail line between Baltimore and Washington, DC, adding to a $28 million grant from the Transportation Department for similar studies. Northeast Maglev, which is promoting the 40-mile, $10 billion high-speed rail line, points out that the Japanese government would also cover part of the actual project costs. Many officials and observers of the attempt to study a high-speed rail connection between the two cities say faster transportation options would encourage bilateral investment, commuting, and travel given the region’s traffic congestion and opportunities to entice more Washington residents to move to Baltimore for lower living costs.

Deepwater Wind Completes First US Offshore Wind Farm, But Critics Remain.

In a 1,345-word article, the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Dennis) reports “the nation’s first offshore wind farm” has been completed off the cost of Block Island, Rhode Island. According to the Post, the “deliberately small size” of the five-turbine, 30-megawatt project by Providence-based Deepwater Wind is one of the reasons it “has successfully navigated the legal, regulatory and political hurdles that have tripped up others.” While some see the project’s completion as a cause for celebration, the Post says the wind farm “has not been universally embraced by the island’s roughly 1,000 year-round residents,” some of whom view the project’s agreement with regional utility National Grid as a “financial giveaway” to Deepwater Wind investors because it does not represent a cost saving over the diesel generators it is replacing on the island with some of the nation’s highest electrical rates.

NYTimes: First US Offshore Wind Farm Shows Promise For Wind Energy. The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Subscription Publication) editorializes that while the “first offshore wind farm in American waters” may not “make much of a dent” in the country’s use of fossil fuels, it “shows the promise this renewable energy source could have.” Pointing to the “22 other offshore wind projects in…development across the country,” the Times says offshore farms “should become commonplace” in the next 10 years.

WSJournal A1: Texas Embraces Development Of Wind, Solar Power.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28, A1, Spindle, Smith, Subscription Publication) reports on its front page that in a 1,411-word analysis that Texas has become a US leader in renewable energy. The state still embraces its oil and gas, and continues to develop new crude oil wells, but approximately 16 percent of the state’s electricity now comes from wind turbines. Solar power is expected to play a growing role in Texas as well. Republican lawmakers in the state have touted renewable energy development as a way to create jobs and improve consumer choice.

WPost: New FAA Drone Rules Are Still “Quite Restrictive.”

A Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28) editorial says that while FAA rules are phasing in Monday, which will “allow companies to fly small drones…without a special waiver from the agency” avoid “several crucial mistakes that could have grounded a young industry,” they are still “quite restrictive, particularly the requirement that operators keep drones within their line of sight.” The Post argues that “officials used to decades of regulating big airliners need to do a more nimble job adapting to the revolution in unmanned and, some day soon, automated flight.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Marvel Comics Covers To Promote STEAM Disciplines.

The NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28) “The Two-Way” blog reports Marvel Comics has announced that five of its titles in coming issues will use cover art “featuring disciplines that guide school curricula nationwide — Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math, also known as STEAM” as part of an effort to “encourage young readers to double-down on their studies and explore fields said to lead to better jobs.” The November issues of several titles “coincide with the debut of Marvel’s new Iron Man, Riri Williams, a 15-year-old engineering prodigy, who is also featured.”

Chickasha High School Juniors Taking STEM Education Classes At Local Tech Center Campus.

The Oklahoman Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/27, Kramer) reports Canadian Valley Technology Center will host juniors from Chickasha High School enrolled in its pre-engineering program at its Chickasha campus this year. The program was launched “last year as an embedded program for sophomores at Chickasha High School,” and this year’s enrolled sophomores will continue to “remain off-site.” Student Services Director Ronnie Bogle “said the program worked well the first year” and that “he is excited to have students on campus for the program that represents an evolutionary shift in curriculum for a technology center.”

USS Turner Joy Adopts New Approach To STEM Education.

The Central Kitsap (WA) Reporter Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/28, Beahm) reports that according to the Bremerton Historical Ships Association president John Hanson, “the newest version of STEM” is “hands-on so kids can learn faster and less traditional than a whiteboard or a classroom.” STEM classes on board the USS Turner Joy, made possible in part by NHF funding, “include practical demonstrations of Newtonian physics, thermodynamics, electric erosion and more.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Springer Nature and FLTRP in deal to publish English book series – Key Concepts in Chinese Thought and Culture
Publisher Springer Nature has reached an agreement with the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP) in publishing an English book series called Key Concepts in Chinese Thought and Culture. Under the agreement, both parties will aim to publish a series of books written by Chinese experts on the basis of the key concepts in Chinese thought and culture.
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Cell Press transforms article methods section to improve transparency and accessibility
Biomedical journal Cell is introducing a redesigned methods section to help authors clearly communicate how experiments are conducted amid discussions around scientific reproducibility. The first papers using Structured, Transparent, Accessible Reporting (STAR) Methods, which promotes guidelines encouraged by reagent labeling and animal experimentation initiatives, appear in Cell on August 25.
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The ASEAN group nearly doubled its share of the world’s research papers since 2006, increasing patenting activity by over 40% in the past three years, says new report
The Association of Southeast Asian Nations or ASEAN collectively almost doubled its share of the world’s research papers (scientific literature), and increased its patenting activity, a common industry measure of innovation, by more than 40 percent in the last three years. These are just some of the key findings from the ‘ASEAN – The Emerging Research and Innovation Hub’ report produced by the Intellectual Property & Science (IP & Science) business of Thomson Reuters, which suggests that the ASEAN region is becoming a hub of research and innovation activity.
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ProQuest continues to enrich its book offerings with new print and ebook titles
ProQuest continues to enrich its book offerings with new print and ebook titles and with advancements that simplify access to content. In addition to launching its innovative Access-to-Own acquisition model on the Ebook Central® platform, the company has debuted new ebook subscriptions, an online ebook catalog and expanded acquisition options for both print and electronic titles on the OASIS® platform – all designed to improve librarian workflows.
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Access Community Health Network adopts Wolters Kluwer’s UpToDate Anywhere to reduce disparities in healthcare quality
Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced that Access Community Health Network (ACCESS) has adopted UpToDate® Anywhere to help improve the quality of care provided to patients throughout greater Chicago. The evidence-based clinical decision support resource is accessible to clinicians on mobile devices and via the Epic electronic health record (EHR) system throughout Cook and DuPage counties.
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NISO unveils new project to create a flexible API framework for e-content in libraries
Voting Members of the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) have approved a new project to modernize library-vendor technical interoperability to improve the access of digital library content and electronic books. Building upon a set of API (Application Programming Interface) Requirements developed by Queens Library, a new NISO Working Group will create a foundational API set that the library community can build on.
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NIH names Dr. Diana Bianchi as director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
The National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis S. Collins has announced the selection of Dr. Diana W. Bianchi as director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Dr. Bianchi is expected to join NIH on October 31, 2016. As NICHD director, Dr. Bianchi will oversee research on pediatric health and development, maternal health, reproductive health, and intellectual and developmental disabilities.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Researchers Discover iPhone Vulnerability Prompting Swift iOS 9.3.5 Patch From Apple.

Numerous reports today say Apple is urging iPhone owners to download the recently issued iOS 9.3.5 update after researchers discovered a recent spyware vulnerability that allows hackers unauthorized access to targeted devices. According to the AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26), the vulnerability was first made public Thursday in a report published by Citizens and Research Lab, which found the security hole after the iPhone of a well-known UAE activist, Ahmed Mansoor, was targeted using a message-based method previously unknown to analysts. BGR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Siegal), offering additional details on the “tantalizing message,” says that the malware-infected link promised “New secrets about torture of Emiratis in state prisons” and was originally sent via text to Mansoor’s iPhone 6. As a consistent target of previous hacking attempts – and what Yahoo! Sports Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Seitz) describes as a “notorious thorn in the side” of the UAE government, Mansoor was immediately suspicious of the message and instead of opening the link, forwarded it to researchers at University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab for further investigation. Yahoo! News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Menn) says that investigation led to their eventual discovery of the malware. If Mansoor had accessed the link as intended, reports ZDNet Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), hackers would have been able to track his movements, all electronic messages and phone calls, and even remotely control the camera and microphone on the handset. As today’s heavy coverage of the story suggests, the flaw is a significant find for researchers, who claim this could be one of the first discovered attacks of its kind when it comes to cyberweapons research. Lookout representative Heather MacKinnon recently told The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Uchill) “We’ve never seen a remote jailbreak vulnerability in the wild before.”Wired Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Newman) says an “established private cyberarms dealer” called NSO Group may have been working on behalf of the UAE, and “has been selling masterful spyware” to government actors for some time – most often producing code to take advantage of holes in Apple’s iOS system. Mansoor confirmed to the Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Peterson), “I’m a regular target for the authorities here,” he told The Post. “Every time they get new spyware, they seem to try it out on me.” The Daily Mail Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) , citing the AP, reports that not only was this an “unusually sophisticated piece of software” that took about two weeks to fully uncover, but ultimately incorporated software that “likely cost a small fortune” to produce. In fact, Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Menn) explains that similar remote exploit software can sell for as much as $1 million. According to Mashable Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Wong), however, NSO Group spokesperson Zamir Dahbash remained vague about the firm’s specific relationship with UAE officials, telling the New York Times recently, “The company sells only to authorized governmental agencies, and fully complies with strict export control laws and regulations.”

This latest breach is not only a major development for Apple, but according to Seeking Alpha Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/26), could point to a worrying trend in the cybersecurity domain. Although this particular event lasted just three days before Apple was able to distribute a fix, SA underscores that even these short-term security holes “can have majorly destructive impact” on users. And while there’s now way to know for certain how long similar exploits have been in practice (MacWorld Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Fleishman) suggests that prior to iOS 9, these specific attack methods were likely “deployed against individual targets” rather than achieving widespread use), Apple is advising users to execute the download as soon as possible. A report from TIME Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) today, insisting that users “Update Your iPhone Immediately” along with related CNET News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) coverage describing “Why you should update your iPhone. Right. Now,” each offer specific instructions on how to the download the latest 9.3.5 iOS update. Apple has also, through a spokesperson, assured Ars Technica Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) that its upcoming iOS 10 will incorporate a patch for the vulnerability. As for the patch itself,Mashable Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Wong) reports that it will operate by running an “arbitrary code with kernel privileges,” delivering a security boost that effectively blocks the malware from gaining unauthorized access to a device.

Higher Education

North Carolina’s Campbell University Opens Engineering, Nursing Schools.

WUNC-FM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Chapel Hill, NC (8/24) reports North Carolina’s Campbell University has launched a nursing school and a school of engineering, “welcoming 96 engineering and 46 nursing students on the first day of classes.” Founding engineering dean Jenna Carpenter “said while other colleges often offer highly specialized programs for undergraduates, Campbell will offer a general engineering degree with concentrations in mechanical and chemical engineering.” The piece quotes Carpenter saying, “There’s been a push to sort of specialize students, even at the undergrad level, what I would call ‘boutique’ undergraduate degrees. The problem is there aren’t a lot of jobs out there, because employers come looking for mechanical engineers or chemical engineers.”

ED Cuts Off Federal Aid For ITT, Claws Back $153 Million.

ED’s announcement that it is cutting off ITT Educational Services’ access to Federal financial aid generated headlines in a number of national media outlets. Coverage focuses on accusations that the firm engaged in abusive practices and on the likelihood that the move will lead to the firm’s demise. The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Morgenson, Subscription Publication) reports that ED “imposed strict new rules on” ITT, “barring it from enrolling new students who use federal financial aid and ordering it to pay $153 million to the department within 30 days to cover student refunds if its schools close down.” The Times reports that Education Secretary John King “said the department took action to protect both ITT’s students and the taxpayers who are on the hook for losses when students default on their federal aid.” The piece quotes King saying, “Looking at all of the risk factors, it’s clear that we need increased financial protection and that it simply would not be responsible or in the best interest of students to allow ITT to continue enrolling new students who rely on federal student aid funds.” The Times says the “beleaguered company” might not be able to weather the change because like much of the for-profit sector, it “relies heavily on government financial aid programs for students to fund its operations.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Binkley) reports that ED officials have enacted “a series of measures that could threaten the survival of the chain, which has been the subject of state and federal investigations focusing on its recruiting and accounting practices. Company officials did not immediately comment.” The piece notes that ED had already ordered the chain to pay $44 million “to cover student refunds and other liabilities in case the company closes” in June. The AP reports that King said, “It simply would not be responsible or in the best interest of students to allow ITT to continue enrolling new students who rely on federal financial aid.”

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Douglas-Gabriel) reports that the firm’s shares “plummeted 35 percent to an all-time low” on the news that “ITT is no longer allow to new enroll students who rely on federal loans and grants, nor can the company award raises, pay bonuses or make severance payments to its executives without the department’s approval.” The firm must also tell ED “of any significant financial or oversight events, including violations of existing loan agreements or substantial financial losses.”

The Indianapolis Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Briggs) reports that analysts are calling the move “a death sentence for ITT Technical Institute,” though ED officials are “offering assurances that the for-profit college chain’s students will be taken care of.” The Star reports that the “devastating restrictions” could put the firm “out of business within weeks.” The piece explains that the firm “must increase its reserves from $94.4 million to $247.3 million, or 40 percent of federal student aid the company received in 2015.” The move “sent shares of ITT plummeting 35 percent to $1.40,” and comes “amid a federal crackdown on for-profit colleges that already has caused Corinthian Colleges to close last year and Brown Mackie College to close all but four locations.”

Other media outlets covering this story include the Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Mitchell, Subscription Publication), BuzzFeed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Hensley-Clancy), Progress Illinois Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), ABC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), the South Bend (IN) Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25),MarketWatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), KWTX-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Waco, TX (8/25), Inside INdiana Business Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), Inside Higher Ed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), theOklahoman Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25), U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Camera), and the Indianapolis Business Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25).

Lawmakers Question University Of Virginia Over Billions Set Aside.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Anderson, Svrluga, Douglas-Gabriel) reports that on Friday, Richmond, Virginia lawmakers will question officials from the University of Virginia over $2.2 billion that has been set aside by the school over the past decade while simultaneously raising tuition. state Sen. Scott A. Surovell said, “Most of us think if you run the government, if you run a surplus, you cut taxes. …Apparently, not U-Va. You just raise tuition some more.” According to the school officials, “the fund was assembled through sound financial management, using investment returns, health-system revenue, donations, operating cash and other sources,” adding that “the $2.2 billion does not include tuition revenue or state general funds and is not intended to fund ongoing operations.”

University Of Chicago To Freshmen: We Do Not Support “Trigger Warnings” Or “Safe Spaces.”

The Chicago Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Vivanco) reports that University of Chicago Dean of Students John Ellison told incoming freshmen in a letter that “Our commitment to academic freedom means that we do not support so-called ‘trigger warnings,’ we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual ‘safe spaces’ where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own.” Trigger warnings “alert students of sensitive material that might be uncomfortable, offensive or traumatic to them, such as discussions about race and sexual assault,” and safe spaces “shelter students from certain speakers and topics.”

From ASEE
ABET Update
The Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) Criteria Committee met in Baltimore last month to continue reviewing the EAC Criteria 3 and 5 Proposal. After spending months categorizing, summarizing, and evaluating each one of the hundreds of comments, the committee has taken that feedback into consideration and made a number of modifications to the content of the proposal.

The Engineering Area Delegation will review the proposal in late October, as it has the final approval authority for these proposed changes. The Delegation has three options: approve the proposed criteria as written and implement, delay final approval for one year and seek additional public comment, or reject the proposal.  More details are here.


Envisioning the Future of the Maker Movement
A new report from ASEE on this important development in engineering education.


Sustainable Development Primer for Higher Education Presidents, Chancellors, Trustees and Senior Leaders
This new primer describes the sustainability related, crucial roles and tasks for presidents, trustees, and senior leadership and explains how sustainability is a robust national trend in higher education

Research and Development

Nvidia Details Powerful New Processor For Self-Driving Cars.

eWeek Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Burt) reports that Nvidia is furthering its ambitions in the dynamic autonomous vehicle space, unveiling a new mobile processor that pairs its latest Denver 2.0 CPU and Pascal-based GPUs to power deep-learning applications that will make cars smart enough to recognize and respond to obstacles. Nvidia engineers unveiled the details of the company’s Tegra “Parker” processor at this week’s Hot Chips 2016 show, noting that the chip is aimed at automotive uses such as self-driving cars and digital cockpits in vehicles, although its potential applications are not confined to the automotive industry. The Denver 2.0 CPU is a seven-way superscalar chip designed for improved performance and power efficiency over its predecessors. Company officials said the Pascal GPU in Parker enables it to run deep-learning inference algorithms for self-driving functionality, and to run multiple high-resolution displays. Parker-based cars will communicate with cloud-based Pascal-powered supercomputers that continually update the chips to enhance accuracy and safety.

University Of Texas Team Develops Material For Low-Cost Adjustable Window Tinting.

Engadget Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/22) reports scientists at the University of Texas Cockrell School of Engineering in Austin, led by associate professor Delia Milliron developed “a new flexible smart window material” that can provide an adjustable tint to windows “and can easily be applied with a new low-cost, low-temperature process.” The material “is an amorphous solid made of chemically condensed niobium oxide,” which may be “applied to plastics” as well as glass. Milliron said that the new process might lead to “more efficient supercapacitors” as well.

Tech Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/23) reports the material could “pave the way for windows, sunroofs or even windshields” that could help “save on cooling and heating bills.” It has “a unique nanostructure that doubles the efficiency of the coloration process.”

NSF Grant To Help Researchers Use High-End Computing Resources.

The Urbana/Champaign (IL) News-Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Wurth) reports the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois won a $110 million five-year grant to support the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE). The project links researchers “to high-end digital resources” in order to “maximize their use and advance scientific discovery.” The money will be used to fund “the expertise to support” the use of existing resources by researchers.

Facebook To Make Image Recognition AI Code Public.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Akhtar) reports Facebook is making public code and research on its computer image recognition AI, in a move aimed to advance the field of machine vision, “as the social network expands on users’ interest in sharing and interacting with photos and videos.” Facebook AI Research (FAIR) scientist Piotr Dollar said, “The more the community is using open source code, the faster it is improved and innovated on, which helps expand expertise and adds longevity to projects we feel are very important.” USA Today says Facebook is “racing to have an edge” in AI, seen as key to making its “ecosystem of services” more “intertwined with its users’ daily lives.” USA Today cites the report “Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation,” which found that companies that perfect an open tool have a shot to become the industry standard. Netflix’s Simian Army blog did this though its early use of Amazon Web Services, building a reputation as an “exemplary cloud-native application building company.”

University Of Delaware Program Helps Students Develop Business Ideas.

The Wilmington (DE) News Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/23, Goss) reports on the University of Delaware’s Summer Founders Program, led by Vincent DiFelice, who taught a 12-week course this summer for “less than 20 students working in teams on five prospective business and two social ventures.” Each student was paid a stipend to participate in “weekly sit-downs with successful entrepreneurs, along with educational sessions and ongoing progress meetings.” At the end of the course, the students gave presentations on their projects to “peers, mentors and potential investors.” In addition to class time, and meetings with experienced business owners and operators, they also “spent 50 to 60 hours per week meeting with potential customers, market testing their ideas and creating prototypes or beta versions” of products.

University Of Texas Team Develops Material For Low-Cost Adjustable Window Tinting.

Engadget Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/22) reports scientists at the University of Texas Cockrell School of Engineering in Austin, led by associate professor Delia Milliron developed “a new flexible smart window material” that can provide an adjustable tint to windows “and can easily be applied with a new low-cost, low-temperature process.” The material “is an amorphous solid made of chemically condensed niobium oxide,” which may be “applied to plastics” as well as glass. Milliron said that the new process might lead to “more efficient supercapacitors” as well.

Tech Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/23) reports the material could “pave the way for windows, sunroofs or even windshields” that could help “save on cooling and heating bills.” It has “a unique nanostructure that doubles the efficiency of the coloration process.”

Harvard Researchers Develop “Squishy” Robot.

The Christian Science Monitor Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Dussault) reports that “Harvard researchers have engineered the first robot that is both autonomous and completely soft-bodied.” The robot “runs on hydrogen peroxide and was designed to look like a small octopus,” and “researchers say, is a major step toward developing functional robots that don’t need hard skeletons or rigid moving parts.”

US Military Soliciting Help From Fashion Designers, Textile Experts For New Protective Suits.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/24, Ellis) says the US military “is soliciting help from fashion designers and textile experts to assist in redesigning the protective suits soldiers wear against chemical and biological attacks.” The US Department of Defense’s Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense “has launched a competition dubbed ‘Proof-The Chembio Suit Design Challenge’ and is offering a total of $250,000 to finalists and semifinalists.”

NSF Awards Grant To TAMU System For Solar Technology Research In Partnership With UT.

The Bryan College Station (TX) Eagle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Kuhlmann) reports that “the National Science Foundation awarded Texas A&M University, Texas A&M University – Central Texas and the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station four-year, $400,000 grants aimed at confronting the challenges that prevent the technology from being widely adopted.” The Texas A&M University System has partnered with The University of Texas to work on the NSF-funded solar research initiative.

Global Developments

German Chancellor Merkel Visits NATO Cyber Center In Estonia.

Defense Daily Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Abbott) reports German Chancellor Angela Merkel visited NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence (CCDCOE) during a visit to Estonia this week, where she was briefed on “cyberspace as a new domain,” and the need to cooperate on cyberdefense. The CCDCOE is a knowledge hub that “focuses on interdisciplinary applied research and development concerning cyber security,” including “consultations, training, and information-sharing among NATO members, allies, and partners in cyber defense.” Merkel also met with Estonian Prime Minister Taavi Rõivas and President Toomas Hendruk Ilves.

Industry News

Monroe: August Could Have Been More Transparent Regarding Smart Lock Vulnerability.

In a CNET News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Wollerton) piece, Chris Monroe reports software engineer Jmaxxz gave a presentation at the Defcon technology security conference earlier this month, in which he highlighted vulnerabilities in smart locks manufactured by August in a live demonstration. The vulnerabilities allowed individuals who already had guest access to hack the software to “enroll a new key,” which could then be used even after their guest access had expired. Monroe criticizes August for failing to be respond to the issue “with the degree of transparency we would expect from a company working to make our homes safer.” Johns Hopkins University computer science professor Avi Rubin is quoted saying that, “Often, vendors are quick to deny vulnerabilities in their system and to attack the security researcher or threaten them with lawsuits. It’s nice to see that August admits that their issues exist and that they are fixing them. It would be nice to see an independent review that could confirm that the problem has indeed been fixed.”

Farm Machine Manufacturers Invest In New Tech Despite Sluggish Sales.

Iowa Farmer Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Edwards) reports that although farm machinery sales are down in 2016, “manufacturers continue to bring more technology to the market.” For example, Martin Richenhagen, AGCO’s chairman, president and chief executive officer, “said in a statement [earlier this year] that they are maintaining a strong level of investment in new products and technologies, as demonstrated by an increase in engineering expense planned for 2016 compared to 2015.” AGCO has introduced four new tractors, launched new automatic guidance technology, and opened the AgCommand telemetry API (Application Programming Interface).

Amazon Adds New Auto Industry Initiative.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Soper) reports Amazon.com is “pushing deeper into the auto industry and car-parts market” with a new website featuring descriptions of thousands of new and classic car models. Customers “can research but not buy” cars on the new Amazon Vehicles website. It’s designed “to complement the company’s other car initiatives,” which “let shoppers save vehicles in their profiles to make it easier to find parts they need” as well as “book and pay for routine auto maintenance such as oil changes, tire rotation, and battery installation.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Environmental Groups Push Obama To Block Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Henry) reports President Obama is being asked by green groups “to intervene in the construction of a controversial oil pipeline project in North Dakota.” On Thursday, 31 green groups sent a letter to Obama that “said the White House should deny and revoke the permits necessary to build the Dakota Access pipeline, a 1,168-mile project that would carry 450,000 barrels of Bakken crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois.” The letter “comes after the Standing Rock Sioux tribe of North Dakota sued the Army Corps of Engineers over its approval of the project.” The environmental groups are hoping Obama will “deny new permits for the project, as he did with the Keystone XL pipeline project last year, and remove existing permits issued by the Army Corps.” E&E News PM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Northey, Subscription Publication) reports Sen. Bernie Sanders yesterday voiced his opposition to the pipeline. In a statement Sanders said, “Like the Keystone XL pipeline, which I opposed since day one, the Dakota Access fracked oil pipeline will transport some of the dirtiest fuel on the planet. … Regardless of the court’s decision, the Dakota Access pipeline must be stopped.” NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) provides coverage of the protest against the pipeline by hundreds of Native Americans that have “set up camp at the site where the pipeline is slated to cross under the Missouri River.”

Iowa Utilities Board Does Not Immediately Vote On Pipeline Request. The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) reports the Iowa Utilities Board on Thursday declined “to say whether they’d halt construction of an oil pipeline beyond this week on the properties of 14 landowners.” The board heard over “two hours of arguments from attorneys for the landowners and the Texas-based pipeline company on whether to order a more permanent delay beyond Monday while a court considers a lawsuit they’ve filed that challenges the board’s authority to allow eminent domain for a privately owned pipeline project.”

California Passes Emissions Law To Drastically Cut Greenhouse Gas Levels By 2030.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Medina, Richtel, Subscription Publication) reports that California lawmakers have passed legislation requiring the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels through 2030. Gov. Jerry Brown has promised to sign the lay. Brown said the law “is a real commitment backed up by real power,” calling it a milestone in the state’s climate change efforts. California passed similar legislation in 2006 and is on track to meet its goal of reducing emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

Volkswagen May Compensate Brand Dealerships Affected By Emissions Scandal.

ABC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Steinberger, Dooley) reports on its website that Volkswagen has reached a preliminary deal to compensate 652 VW brand dealers affected by its diesel emissions scandal. The potential settlement amount has not yet been disclosed, but will involve cash payments to “resolve alleged past, current, and future claims of losses in franchise value,” VW said in a statement. TheWall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Randazzo, Viswanatha, Boston, Subscription Publication) reports that Volkswagen on Thursday expressed confidence that it can make the three-liter vehicles fully compliant with US emissions standards, though not necessarily so with the two-liter models. VW attorney Robert Giuffra stressed the technical complexity of the task. The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Henry) also covers the potential settlement.

Judge Orders Volkswagen, Regulators To Find “Plan B” If Diesel Emissions Fix Cannot Be Made. The Financial Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, McGee, Waldmeir, Subscription Publication) reports that a US court ordered lawyers on both sides Volkswagen’s diesel emissions scandal to begin contingency negotiations in case 85,000 cars that violate EPA pollution rules cannot be fixed. The judge cited slow progress toward a fix.

Secondary Market Emerging For Used Electric Car Batteries As Home Energy Storage.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Martin) reports that according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, about 95 gigawatt-hours of lithium-ion batteries are expected to come out of cars by 2025, of which 26 gigawatt-hours will be converted to stationary systems as demand for both electric cars and solar rooftops increases. Used batteries for stationary use cost about half the cost of fresh batteries. BNEF analyst Claire Curry said, “There’s a sweet spot now where new batteries are still expensive for stationary use.”

Groups Challenge Federal Oil, Gas Leasing On Climate Grounds.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25) reports that in a federal lawsuit filed on Thursday in Washington, D.C., two environmental groups, WildEarth Guardians and Physicians for Social Responsibility, argue the “federal government needs to consider the potential effects of climate change before allowing oil and gas drilling on public land.” The lawsuit challenges “almost 400 oil and gas leases the U.S. Bureau of Land Management recently has issued in Wyoming, Utah and Colorado.” The AP adds that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has said ending fossil-fuel extraction on public lands would “wipe out thousands of jobs.” The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Cama) reports the lawsuit “seeks to block drilling on nearly 380,000 acres of public lands that were leased to oil and gas companies since 2015.” The groups contend “that the drilling unacceptably threatens the climate, public health and the integrity of the lands.”

E&E News PM Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Subscription Publication) reports in a statement WildEarth Guardians’ Tim Ream said, “President Obama seems to get climate change, but he has an unexplainable blind spot when it comes to leasing public lands to oil and gas companies. … The Obama administration leases a million acres of public lands a year to dirty energy companies but hasn’t bothered to disclose the inevitable climate pollution? That’s not just immoral, it’s illegal, and we’re going to stop it.”

The Denver Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Finley) reports BLM officials told the paper that “they are aware of the complaint.” The BLM said in a statement, “Although we do not provide comment on pending litigation, the BLM has been working over the last several years to update and modernize the rules governing its oil and gas program. … The BLM will continue to work with lessees and operators to implement best management practices and to promote safe and efficient operations and minimize impacts to the environment.” TheDeseret (UT) News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, O’Donoghue) reports Western Energy Alliance’s Kathleen Sgamma said, “The lawsuit by WildEarth Guardians and other keep-it-in-the-ground actions by the environmental lobby are exactly why Western Energy Alliance has taken an aggressive stand to remind (the Bureau of Land Management) and the Interior Department about the actual law which requires oil and natural gas leasing to move forward.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Hands-On Science In Elementary Schools Engaging Youths.

The Clarksburg (WV) Exponent-Telegram Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/25, Reneau) reports that at least 50 percent of science lessons in West Virginia elementary schools are “being taught in a more hands-on, engaging way…” due to a standard promulgated by the state’s Department of Education. Wilsonburg Elementary School Principal Laura Dick believes that is beneficial. “Working hands-on gives the students the opportunity to do things and experiment and observe,” Dick said. “It allows them to explore their environment and explore their curriculum, and gives them a chance to dive into what they’re studying.” Harrison County Schools Assistant Superintendent Wendy Imperial agrees, “Having something that they participate in hands-on helps them remember it,” Imperial said, and “[s]cience lends itself to hands-on activities.” Imperial added that such kinetic learning is not just for young children, because it is “important to use all our different senses and engage the students” in all grades if they are to be expected to learn effectively.

Thursday’s Lead Stories

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UC Davis – ITS : PEV commercialization study

Globally, the plug-in electric vehicle market is steadily growing. Yet these zero-emission cars still represent a drop in the bucket of the 1 billion+ vehicles on the world’s roads today.

A newly released research study that examines current trends and future challenges for wide-scale, worldwide PEV commercialization is the subject of the newest GreenLight Blog from ITS-Davis. Blog author Lew Fulton authored the study with fellow UC Davis researchers Gil Tal and Tom Turrentine.

What are the dynamics at play for auto manufacturers, policymakers and consumers? To read the blog, and access the study, click here.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

MoU signed for the establishment and operation of an ORCID consortium for research institutions in Germany
The ‘ORCID DE’ project of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Technische Informationsbibliothek – German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) on the establishment and operation of an ORCID consortium for research institutions in Germany. TIB will take on the administrative management of the Germany ORCID Consortium and will administer ORCID membership for research institutions in Germany.
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Elsevier publishes comprehensive reference on how to build insect-based agriculture, food and biomaterials industries
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications, edited by Aaron T. Dossey, Juan Morales-Ramos and M. Guadalupe Rojas. This book provides valuable guidance on how to build insect-based agriculture, food and biomaterials industries.
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CNPIEC to distribute EDP content to institutions throughout China
STM publisher EDP Sciences has signed an agreement in Beijing with China National Publications Import & Export (Group) Corporation (CNPIEC) for distribution of their content to institutions throughout China on their digital platform CNPeReading. CNPIEC is the leading distributor of print publications, e-books and e-journals in China and they also organise the Beijing International Book Fair, the largest trade show in Asia.
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SAGE Publishing launches new OA journal Toxicology Research and Application
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has announced that it is launching Toxicology Research and Application, a new open access (OA) journal publishing original research within the field of toxicology. The journal aims to provide a high quality forum for researchers, clinicians, and allied health practitioners from the field of toxicology, as well as those working in industry.
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Expernova joins NFAIS as new member
The National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAISTM), a global nonprofit membership organisation serving the information community, has announced that Expernova, a company that helps businesses improve their R&D performance by analysing their scientific and technological environment, has joined NFAIS as a new member. Expernova provides a global cloud-based platform that enables smart access to Innovation talents and networks.
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Cengage Learning announces additional features for its MindTap Mobile app
Cengage Learning has announced additional features for its MindTap Mobile app, including offline e-reader capabilities, the most requested function by students. Available on iOS and Android smartphones, the enhanced app provides access to Cengage Learning’s flagship digital learning platform, MindTap, which helps to increase engagement and improve outcomes.
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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 90 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 90 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 90 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . Photocatalytic water oxidation with iron oxide hydroxide (rust) nanoparticles Shelton, T.L., Bensema, B.L., Brune, N.K., Wong, C., Yeh, M., Osterloh, F.E. 2017 Journal of Photonics for Energy ,
7 ( 1 ) , art. no. 012002
2 . Far-infrared tangential interferometer/polarimeter design and installation for NSTX-U Scott, E.R., Barchfeld, R., Riemenschneider, P., Domier, C.W., Muscatello, C.M., Sohrabi, M., Kaita, R., Ren, Y., Luhmann, N.C. 2016 Review of Scientific Instruments ,
87 ( 11 ) , art. no. 11E114
3 . Responses of Domestic Horses and Ponies to Single, Combined and Conflicting Visual and Auditory Cues Prendergast, A.K., Nansen, C., Blache, D. 2016 Journal of Equine Veterinary Science ,
46 pp. 40 – 46 .
4 . Comparison of human and southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) health risks for infection with protozoa in nearshore waters Adell, A.D., McBride, G., Wuertz, S., Conrad, P.A., Smith, W.A. 2016 Water Research ,
104 pp. 220 – 230 .
5 . Polymorphisms in ERAP1 and ERAP2 are shared by Caninae and segregate within and between random- and pure-breeds of dogs Pedersen, N.C., Dhanota, J.K., Liu, H. 2016 Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology ,
179 pp. 46 – 57 .
6 . Effects of long-Term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat Li, X., Lewis, E.E., Liu, Q., Li, H., Bai, C., Wang, Y. 2016 Scientific Reports ,
6 , art. no. 30466
7 . Antimicrobial effect of synergistic interaction between UV-A light and gallic acid against Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fresh produce wash water and biofilm Cossu, A., Ercan, D., Wang, Q., Peer, W.A., Nitin, N., Tikekar, R.V. 2016 Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies ,
37 pp. 44 – 52 .
8 . Impact of tillage on the crop pollinating, ground-nesting bee, Peponapis pruinosa in California Ullmann, K.S., Meisner, M.H., Williams, N.M. 2016 Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment,
232 pp. 240 – 246 .
9 . Lake Vanda: A sentinel for climate change in the McMurdo Sound Region of Antarctica Castendyk, D.N., Obryk, M.K., Leidman, S.Z., Gooseff, M., Hawes, I. 2016 Global and Planetary Change ,
144 pp. 213 – 227 .
10 . Suspected myofibrillar myopathy in Arabian horses with a history of exertional rhabdomyolysis Valberg, S.J., McKenzie, E.C., Eyrich, L.V., Shivers, J., Barnes, N.E., Finno, C.J. 2016 Equine Veterinary Journal ,
48 ( 5 ) pp. 548 – 556 .
11 . Association Between Absolute Neutrophil Count and Variation at TCIRG1: The NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project Rosenthal, E.A., Makaryan, V., Burt, A.A., Crosslin, D.R., Kim, D.S., Smith, J.D., Nickerson, D.A., Reiner, A.P., Rich, S.S., Jackson, R.D., Ganesh, S.K., Polfus, L.M., Qi, L., Dale, D.C., Jarvik, G.P. 2016 Genetic Epidemiology ,
40 ( 6 ) pp. 470 – 474 .
12 . Comparison of a peer facilitated support group to cognitive behavior therapy: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial for hoarding disorder Uhm, S.Y., Tsoh, J.Y., Mackin, R.S., Gause, M., Chan, J., Franklin, J., Eckfield, M., Salazar, M., Vigil, O., Bain, D., Stark, S., Vega, E., Delucchi, K.L., Mathews, C.A. 2016 Contemporary Clinical Trials ,
50 pp. 98 – 105 .
13 . Midpoint attractors and species richness: Modelling the interaction between environmental drivers and geometric constraints Colwell, R.K., Gotelli, N.J., Ashton, L.A., Beck, J., Brehm, G., Fayle, T.M., Fiedler, K., Forister, M.L., Kessler, M., Kitching, R.L., Klimes, P., Kluge, J., Longino, J.T., Maunsell, S.C., McCain, C.M., Moses, J., Noben, S., Sam, K., Sam, L., Shapiro, A.M., Wang, X., Novotny, V., Swenson, N. 2016 Ecology Letters ,
19 ( 9 ) pp. 1009 – 1022 .
14 . Safety and Mortality Benefits of Delivering Vitamin A Supplementation at 6 Months of Age in Sub-Saharan Africa Kupka, R., Nielsen, J., Nyhus Dhillon, C., Blankenship, J., Haskell, M.J., Baker, S.K., Brown, K.H. 2016 Food and Nutrition Bulletin ,
37 ( 3 ) pp. 375 – 386 .
15 . Erratum to: Immunoanalysis for environmental monitoring and human health (Anal Bioanal Chem, 10.1007/s00216-016-9666-x) Gee, S.J., Kennedy, I.R., Lee, N.A., Ohkawa, H., Prapamontol, T., Xu, T. 2016 Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry ,
408 ( 22 ) p. 6069 .
16 . Exploring perceptions and use of the electronic health record by parents of children with autism spectrum disorder: A qualitative study Bush, R.A., Stahmer, A.C., Connelly, C.D. 2016 Health Informatics Journal ,
22 ( 3 ) pp. 702 – 711 .
17 . Infection risk decreases with increasing mismatch in host and pathogen environmental tolerances Nowakowski, A.J., Whitfield, S.M., Eskew, E.A., Thompson, M.E., Rose, J.P., Caraballo, B.L., Kerby, J.L., Donnelly, M.A., Todd, B.D., Ostfeld, R. 2016 Ecology Letters ,
19 ( 9 ) pp. 1051 – 1061 .
18 . Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase alleviated atherosclerosis by reducing monocyte infiltration in Ldlr<sup>−/−</sup> mice Li, D., Liu, Y., Zhang, X., Lv, H., Pang, W., Sun, X., Gan, L.-M., Hammock, B.D., Ai, D., Zhu, Y. 2016 Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology ,
98 pp. 128 – 137 .
19 . Postharvest internal browning of pineapple fruit originates at the phloem Luengwilai, K., Beckles, D.M., Siriphanich, J. 2016 Journal of Plant Physiology ,
202 pp. 121 – 133 .
20 . Stoppa approach for anterior plate fixation in unstable pelvic ring injury Oh, H.-K., Choo, S.K., Kim, J.-J., Lee, M. 2016 CiOS Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery ,
8 ( 3 ) pp. 243 – 248 .
21 . Assessing the Mechanisms of Senatorial Responsiveness to Constituency Preferences Buttice, M.K., Highton, B. 2016 American Politics Research ,
44 ( 5 ) pp. 767 – 793 .
22 . Recent Advances in Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics for Stroke Napoli, E., Borlongan, C.V. 2016 Translational Stroke Research ,
pp. 1 – 6 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
23 . The Management of Autoimmune Hepatitis Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis: Real-World Experience and a Comprehensive Review Wang, Z., Sheng, L., Yang, Y., Yang, F., Xiao, X., Hua, J., Guo, C., Wei, Y., Tang, R., Miao, Q., Zhang, J., Li, Y., Fang, J., Qiu, D., Krawitt, E.L., Bowlus, C.L., Gershwin, M.E., Wang, Q., Ma, X. 2016 Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology ,
pp. 1 – 12 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
24 . Habitat Management to Reduce Human Exposure to Trypanosoma cruzi and Western Conenose Bugs (Triatoma protracta) Shender, L., Niemela, M., Conrad, P., Goldstein, T., Mazet, J. 2016 EcoHealth ,
pp. 1 – 10 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
25 . Using Mung Beans as a Simple, Informative Means To Evaluate the Phytotoxicity of Engineered Nanomaterials and Introduce the Concept of Nanophytotoxicity to Undergraduate Students Ross, S.S., Owen, M.J., Pedersen, B.P., Liu, G.-Y., Miller, W.J.W. 2016 Journal of Chemical Education ,
93 ( 8 ) pp. 1428 – 1433 .
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