Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

New reference series from Elsevier provides latest knowledge on highly prevalent medical conditions
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the availability of Clinics Collections, the first of a new series of multidisciplinary, general medical reference digests targeted to a wide variety of healthcare practitioners and professionals. Clinics Collections integrates updated content from Clinics Review Articles to provide a succinct and current overview of specific, highly prevalent medical conditions and significant medical developments.
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John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and ReadCube announce platform-wide integration of ReadCube Checkout technology across all Wiley journals
Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and ReadCube, a Boston-based publisher technology company, have announced the platform-wide integration of ReadCube Checkout technology across all Wiley journals. Following the successful pilot of ReadCube Checkout earlier this year, Wiley now offers rental, cloud and downloadable article access options for the majority of journal articles – offering individual readers the choice to select the level of access that best fits their needs.
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Springer Healthcare unveils reprintsWarehouse.com for pharmaceutical professionals
Springer Healthcare, specialists in delivering innovative medical content and communications solutions, has announced the launch of reprintsWarehouse.com. The responsive platform enables pharmaceutical professionals to rapidly identify content that supports their product or device marketing activities, from a database of over 50,000 clinically relevant medical journals, books, continuing medical education materials and anatomical charts.
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EBSCO expands partnership with OpenAthens to provide single sign-on solution
EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) is making it possible for organisations to provide their users with a single access portal though which they can discover and seamlessly access all library resources regardless of where that content is located. EBSCO has expanded its partnership with OpenAthens from Eduserv to provide a single sign-on solution which allows users to avoid using multiple passwords to log in to the organisation’s accounts.
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Nominations are now open for The BMJ Awards 2015
Nominations are now open for The BMJ Awards 2015, an annual competition now in its seventh year and firmly established as the UK medical profession’s Oscar ceremony, celebrating outstanding achievement and leadership in many fields. The winners will be announced at a glittering ceremony on May 6, 2015 at the Westminster Park Plaza Hotel in London attended by the most influential people in UK medicine.
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Wyoming Medical Center selects ProVation Medical Software for structured cardiology reporting and coding
Healthcare information solutions provider Wolters Kluwer Health has announced that Wyoming Medical Center has selected its ProVation Medical software for structured reporting and coding in its cardiac catheterisation labs. ProVation MD Cardiology claims to be the only dedicated structured reporting and coding solution that improves clinical communication and efficiency within and outside the cath lab.
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Rollins College opts for Ex Libris Alma and Primo
Library automation solutions provider Ex Libris Group has announced that Rollins College, a historic private liberal arts institution in Florida, has opted for the Ex Libris Alma unified resource management solution and the Ex Libris Primo® discovery and delivery solution. The migration to Alma and Primo will enable Rollins to consolidate library management and discovery into one platform.
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Sven Fund leaves De Gruyter
Academic publisher De Gruyter is reorganising its management board. In the future, the management board will consist of just two managing directors. As part of this change, Dr. Sven Fund will depart from the company. The two remaining managing directors, Dr. Anke Beck and Carsten Buhr, will take over the responsibilities formerly assumed by Sven Fund.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

New Research Center Aims To Develop Second Generation Of Surgical Robots.

The New York Times  (10/24, Markoff, Subscription Publication) reports an Intuitive donated system, $3 million National Science Foundation research grant, and $200,000 from two private donors will allow the University of California, Berkeley to create a new center for the development of medical robots for low-level and repetitive surgical tasks, allowing surgeons to focus on the more complex aspects of surgeries. The center hopes to advance the da Vinci robot, the first to successfully operate on soft tissue, by teaching it to learn from human surgeons; the robot has been criticized for failing to surpass human expertise, though UC Davis Health System professor of surgery Dr. W. Douglas Boyd has stated the fault lies with improper training in hospitals acquiring robots only for competitive purposes.

Higher Education

More Coverage Of UNC-Chapel Hill Academic Fraud Scandal.

Former Federal investigator Ken Wainstein’s investigative report into the University of North Carolina’s academic fraud continued to generate media coverage, focusing primarily on reactions from school administrators and outside officials. The AP  (10/23, Beard; Dalesio) reports, that North Carolina’s “alarming lack of institutional oversight” is why academic fraud persisted for so long. North Carolina chancellor Carol Folt explained that “Bad actions of a relatively few number of people were definitely compounded by inaction and the lack of really appropriate checks and balances.” North Carolina athletic director Bubba Cunningham said that the school will “obviously” vacate wins if the NCAA finds that ineligible student-athletes were allowed to play, but says he is “very comfortable with our certification process — that our students were eligible to compete when they competed.”

Inside Higher Ed  (10/23, New) adds that College Sports Research Institute at the University of South Carolina director Richard Southall said the scandal may be “as big a one that has ever come to light.” He argues that the problem is not limited to North Carolina because student-athletes are “brought into a system to generate revenue,” and often struggle academically. Advisors do their best to ensure that these student-athletes can survive their coursework, which is where unethical decisions are made. Inside Higher Ed also notes that the university’s school newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel, wrote that the school examine changing the pretense that it is necessary for student-athletes to “perform in the classroom at the same pace as students admitted for their academic achievements.”

FoxSports  (10/24, Barnes) notes that North Carolina history professor and former faculty athletics representative David Goldfield claimed the scandal is “not that different” from previous academic scandals at Auburn University and the University of Michigan, because the intention of all three cases was the effort to ensure that student-athletes remained eligible at the expense of their education. Goldfield argues that the no-show classes like those at North Carolina are the result of the NCAA’s 2003 academic reform measures. He says the NCAA lowered admissions requirements while simultaneously making it harder to remain academically eligible to participate in a sport.

Most Students Not Athletes. The Washington Post  (10/23, Anderson) reports that while the media has focused on student-athlete participation in the no-show classes, the majority of students who took such classes were not athletes. The Post writes that this fact “raises questions” about the number of school administrators that “knew about the scandal before it broke — or should have known.”

Other sources providing coverage include: USA Today  (10/24, Donnan), the Chronicle of Higher Education  (10/24, Stripling), the Charlotte (NC) Observer  (10/23), and the New Jersey Local News  (10/24).

California College President: Elite Schools Should Admit More Community College Transfers.

In an op-ed in the Washington Post  (10/23, Nikias), University of Southern California President CL Max Nikias writes that the nation’s leading private research universities should follow his institution’s lead by “widely recruiting and admitting transfer students from two-year community colleges,” arguing that this could help them to refute the perception that they are “perpetrators of high student debt or bastions of privilege.” He cites research indicating that very few students at such schools come from community colleges, and describes ways that colleges can actively recruit such students while maintaining high academic standards.

From ASEE
ASEE-Developed Resources for K-12 Teachers of Engineering
Comprehensive details on teacher prep and a professional development matrix are found here.

ASEE Perks
ASEE launches “ASEE Perks” a new collection of discounted products and services, only for members.

ASEE Members on Professional Leadership Opportunities
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier launches first virtualized medical institution on PracticeUpdate
STM publisher Elsevier recently announced the launch of the first virtual Center of Excellence focused on a single disease, renal cell carcinoma. The knowledge-sharing site for physicians was created by PracticeUpdate, Elsevier’s physician portal, in partnership with The West Cancer Center at the University of Tennessee.
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Springer and Baden-Wuerttemberg Consortium sign agreement for access to 1,917 Springer e- journals
Starting January 2015, researchers, faculty members and students affiliated with colleges and universities in the German state of Baden-Wuerttemberg will have convenient access to 1,917 electronic journals published by Springer. The license will continue through the end of 2017. Furthermore, the state has purchased permanent archival rights to these journals back to 2003 for inclusion in the Baden-Wuerttemberg Archive.
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Kudos and Thomson Reuters partner to add citation data to author dashboards
Kudos, which helps researchers and institutions maximise the impact and visibility of their publications, has announced a partnership with Thomson Reuters through which Kudos author dashboards will be augmented with citation data from Web of Science, the premier web-based platform for scientific search and discovery and the authority in science, social science, and arts and humanities indices. Kudos provides a platform through which academics can ensure their work is more widely visible, and for measuring the effect of different activities that support discovery.
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Nature Publishing Group joins OASPA
Scientific publisher Nature Publishing Group (NPG) has joined the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), a trade association which represents the interests of open access publishers in all academic disciplines. NPG publishes 73 journals with an open access option, and 38 percent of the research articles published by NPG last year were immediately open access under Creative Commons licenses.
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Webinar on Libraries, Researchers and ORCID scheduled for October 30
The Open Research and Contributor ID (ORCID) has announced a forthcoming webinar on Libraries, Researchers and ORCID. This webinar will explore the ways that libraries can support researchers in creating and using their ORCID iDs. The webinar will be held on October 30th, at 0800 (New York), 1300 (London, Lisbon), 1400 (Paris, Warsaw), 1900 (Beijing), 2000 (Tokyo).
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Unbound Medicine releases Ebola Guidelines, a new resource available as part of the free Relief Central mobile app
Unbound Medicine, a US-based provider of knowledge management solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced the release of Ebola Guidelines, a new resource available as part of the free Relief Central mobile app. Ebola Guidelines consolidates and organises the latest diagnosis, management, and prevention recommendations from leading sources such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and the Johns Hopkins Antibiotic (ABX) Guide.
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Frontiers unveils new OA journal – Frontiers in ICT
Swiss open-access publisher Frontiers, part of the Nature Publishing Group family, has announced the launch of Frontiers in ICT, an international, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed open-access journal that brings all specialisms across information and communications technologies together on a single platform. From big data to digital health and quantum computing to digital education, each relevant specialty will be led by dedicated team of international researchers.
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Cambridge University Press and the BSHS announce publishing partnership
Academic publisher Cambridge University Press and the British Society for the History of Science (BSHS) have announced their partnership to launch a new, peer-reviewed, open access, thematic journal, for the history of science. A call for proposals for the first volume of BJHS Themes has been released, seeking thematic collections of papers that animate, provoke and inspire the scholarly community.
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Synthesis Update from Morgan & Claypool Publishers

The following titles were published in September.

 

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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

DOE Grant Awarded To Pitt Researchers.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette  (10/22, Ritenbaugh) reports University of Pittsburgh researchers “were awarded a $987,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy University Programs to develop a fiber optical sensor network to improve safety in nuclear power reactors.” The article notes that “the principal investigator is Kevin Chen, an associate professor of electrical engineering, and Paul Lego, faculty fellow.” In a statement Chen said, “An important lesson of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 is the lack of situation awareness of nuclear power systems, especially under stressed or severe situations. … When the plant was evacuated following the earthquake and tsunami, we lost the ability to know what was happening in key systems. This information blackout prevented the implementation of proper control mechanisms, which then triggered a disastrous chain of events.”

The Pittsburgh Business Times  (10/23, Subscription Publication) reports Corning Inc. and Westinghouse Electric Co. “are collaborating on the project.”

Higher Education

UNC-Chapel Hill Investigation Report Reveals Two Decades Of Academic Fraud.

NBC Nightly News (10/22, story 8, 2:15, Williams) broadcast that former US Attorney Ken Wainstein unveiled the findings of his investigation into the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, revealing “what may be the biggest academic fraud in collegiate history.” North Carolina president Thomas Ross said he was “shocked and embarrassed” to learn that for over 18 years, student-athletes, primarily from the school’s football and basketball teams, were “funneled” into 188 “no-show” classes in the African-American studies department that required “no class time, no professor and only a single term paper graded by an administrative assistant.” The student-athletes received A’s and B’s from the administrative assistant so that they could remain eligible for their respective sports. Wainstein said he found no evidence that anyone outside of the African-American Studies department knew of the fraud. NBC (Tom Costello) reported that nine staffers have “been fired or disciplined and none of the current coaches were involved.” The report now goes to the NCAA, which could impose further sanctions.

The CBS Evening News (10/22, story 5, 2:20, Pelley) broadcast that “more than 3,000 students, nearly half of them athletes, were enrolled in classes that did not exist and got credit just the same.” According to a newly-released report, “Deborah Crowder, an office administrator in the Department of African and afro-American studies, started a scheme to enroll students in classes that never met and had only one minimal requirement.” Former US Attorney Kenneth Wainstein, who prepared the report, is shown saying, “They didn’t take notes, have to stay awake. They didn’t have to meet with professors. And the only course work they had to do was write a single paper. Deborah Crowder graded the papers and handed out liberally high grades regardless of the quality of papers.”

The New York Times  (10/23, Lyall, Subscription Publication) adds that Wainstein’s report “made abundantly clear” that the fake classes “went a long way toward” ensuring that student-athletes remained eligible. The African-American studies department chairman Julius Nyang’oro, who recorded grades for many of the fake classes, would grade student-athletes’ papers based solely on “the impact that grade would have on the student’s ability to remain eligible.” While the report found no evidence that high-level university officials had knowledge of the fake classes, it was critical of the university for failing to see “numerous warning signs over many years.” North Carolina chancellor Carol Folt has said the school has put in place directors to prevent such fraud from happening again. She said that four university employees have been terminated as a result of the report, and five others have begun disciplinary proceedings.

The Washington Post  (10/22, Culpepper) reports that Wainstein said “the most striking” aspect of the report was a power point presentation shown to the North Carolina football staff in November 2009, which admitted to putting student-athletes in the no show classes. The presentation stated that student-athletes “didn’t have to pay attention or necessarily engage with the material,” nor did they need to “take notes or have to stay awake.”

University Of Texas-Arlington Water Resources Engineer Works To Predict Urban Water Flow.

Phys  (10/23) reports that DJ Seo, an associate professor of water resources engineering at the University of Texas-Arlington’s Civil Engineering Department, “has been awarded a four-year, $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to improve sustainability of large urban areas from extreme weather, urbanization and climate change.” Seo and a team of researchers “will integrate data from advanced weather radar systems, innovative wireless sensors and crowdsourcing of data via cell phone applications to create high-resolution modeling of urban water systems.” They will integrate cloud computing “to produce a suite of products for flash flood forecasting, inundation mapping, water quality forecasting, storm water management, urbanization impact assessment, climate change impact assessment and adaptation, and other applications.”

MSU Leads Research On Radioactive Waste Containment.

WCBI-TV  Columbus, MS (10/23, Minyard) reports that Mississippi State University is leading a research effort to ensure the safe containment of radioactive materials, partnering with leading energy facilities “to test high-efficiency particulate air filtration systems with the goal of developing more robust HEPA filters for the nuclear industry.” The article notes that Savannah River National Laboratory project engineer Scott MacMurray says “the testing at MSU will impact which design of filters his company will purchase in the future.”

ED Announces Loosened PLUS Loan Eligibility Requirements.

The AP  (10/22) reports that ED on Wednesday released a new set of eligibility requirements for PLUS loans that “updates the definition of adverse credit history” allowing more borrowers with poor credit to qualify. The AP notes that in 2011, ED “rolled out more restrictive requirements,” prompting an “outcry from Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which serve a low-income population and have seen thousands of students lose eligibility.” The piece notes that ED “estimates about 370,000 more loan applicants will” qualify under the new guidelines.

The Wall Street Journal  (10/23, Mitchell, Subscription Publication) also covers this story, noting that the announcement comes after a lengthy debate over ED’s 2011 change and the impact that it had on students and their families. The Journal notes that ED’s stated intent is to boost college attendance, and quotes ED Deputy Under Secretary Jeff Appel saying, “These are families who are unable to access credit in the private market…It’s all with the intent of providing wider access to postsecondary education.”

Inside Higher Ed  (10/23) reports that the new rule “reduces from five years to two the period of time that the Education Department reviews when evaluating a prospective borrower’s history for adverse credit events,” and exempts as much as $2,085 in delinquent debt from adversely impacting an application. The article reports that Deputy Secretary Jim Shelton “touted the changes Wednesday as part of the administration’s commitment to improving access to higher education,” quoting him saying, “With these new regulations we’ll reach and better serve many more families and students.” Diverse Education  (10/23) also covers this story.

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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Chevron Announces $20 Million STEM-Focused Program.

The AP  (10/22) reports that Chevron is spending $20 million on the launch of a STEM-focused program dubbed the Appalachia Partnership Initiative. The program is designed to “improve schools and workforce development in 27 counties in southwestern Pennsylvania, northern West Virginia and eastern Ohio.”

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review  (10/21) reports that the project will fund scholarships for community college programs and pay for energy labs in two PA school districts that will have graduate student staff from Carnegie Mellon University. Chevron Appalachia president Nigel Hearne explained, “An educated and skilled workforce leads to economic success.”

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette  (10/21, Gannon) notes other aspects of the program will feature “hands-on STEM projects in K-12 schools” along with training for teachers. Chevron Appalachia president Nigel Hearne announced the initiative on Tuesday, saying, “Our success is deeply linked to the region’s progress, and we believe the Appalachia Partnership Initiative will act as a catalyst for social investment that addresses workforce development and helps to build a new energy economy that creates jobs and economic development opportunities.”

Higher Education

PayPal Co-Founder, Yelp Chairman Addresses University Of Illinois On Computer Science.

The Urbana/Champaign (IL) News-Gazette  (10/21, Des Garennes) reports on Max Levchin’s visit to the University of Illinois to celebrate the Department of Computer Science’s 50th anniversary; Levchin, a graduate himself, co-founded PayPal and is chairman of Yelp. Levchin and other spoke of the need to bring more women into the field and start computer science education sooner. The piece profiles Levchin’s work and success, as well as his influences and future interests, before providing his comments on the need for Illinois to adequately incentivize economic growth and start-ups rather than simply push state pride.

UT To Use DOE Funds To Study New Energy Source In Gulf.

The Houston Chronicle  (10/22, Dlouhy) reports “the University of Texas at Austin has won $58 million to investigate a potentially massive energy resource: methane trapped in ice-like crystals under the Gulf of Mexico and oceans around the world.” The Energy Department “is providing $41.2 million toward the grant, one of the largest government grants ever awarded to the university, with the rest coming from industry and research partners.” UT “plans to use the funding to harvest and analyze core samples of methane hydrate from sandstone reservoirs thousands of feet under the Gulf – the first time the deposits have been retrieved from U.S. waters.”

California Community Colleges Consider Adding New Accrediting Agencies.

The San Francisco Examiner  (10/22) reports that the Consultation Council, a group of representatives of California colleges, “met to discuss a recent recommendation by State Auditor Elaine Howle for the Chancellor’s Office to remove language from its regulations naming the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges as the sole accreditor for schools.” Noting that the ACCJC “voted to strip City College of San Francisco of its accreditation last year,” the article reports that the commission “has been under fire from state lawmakers and college officials following its June 2013 decision to revoke CCSF’s accreditation, effective this past summer.”

Researcher Calls Attention To Bullying In Colleges.

USA Today  (10/21, Krasselt) reports that though there is a “widespread” view that bullying ends in high school, Brian Van Brunt, President of the National Behavioral Intervention Team Association, has focused his attention on college bullying, noting that it can actually become worse when “you’re adding [the] stress” of the college environment, particularly for “first year college students and those in the Greek system.” He also believes there is an increase in bullying at the college level, and is focusing his work on “rampage violence,” such as school shootings as the result of college bullying.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

NPG and Palgrave Macmillan make data from Author Insights survey publicly available as part of Open Access Week
Scientific publisher Nature Publishing Group (NPG) and Palgrave Macmillan are making data from their Author Insights survey publicly available for the first time as part of Open Access Week. NPG and Palgrave Macmillan are making this anonymised data available in order to achieve greater understanding between authors, funders and publishers, particularly with regard to open access.
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Elsevier publishes new books on natural disasters and hazards
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of four new books on natural disasters and hazards, including three from the newly developed Hazards and Disasters series edited by Dr. John F. Shroder. The Hazards and Disasters book series has been developed to provide researchers and professionals with an understanding of the latest scientific discoveries for assessment and prevention.
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Southern Adventist University selects EBSCO Discovery Service
EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) has announced that the Southern Adventist University in Tennessee has selected EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) as its discovery service. Southern Adventist University was recently ranked in the top 30 Best Colleges by U.S. News and World Report for Regional Colleges in the South.
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Global Spine Journal and Evidence-Based Spine-Care Journal to merge into a single publication in 2015
Medical and scientific publishing house Thieme Publishing Group has announced that a number of major changes will be made to the AOSpine journals in 2015. The editors of Global Spine Journal and Evidence-Based Spine-Care Journal, Dr. Wang and Dr. Chapman, have announced that the titles will merge into a single publication in 2015 and will publish under the name Global Spine Journal.
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GBI-Genios’ wiso collections now indexed and discoverable via Central Index of Ex Libris Primo
Library automation solutions provider Ex Libris Group has announced that all journals and the majority of reference databases hosted on GBI-Genios’ wiso-net platform have been indexed in the Ex Libris Primo Central Index of scholarly electronic resources, making the content easily discoverable via the Ex Libris Primo discovery service. In the coming months, the e-books hosted on wiso-net will also be accessible via Primo.
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UBM Tech names James Connolly as Editor-in-Chief and David Wagner as Community Editor of analytics and big data website and community All Analytics
Business information provider UBM Tech has named accomplished journalists James Connolly and David Wagner to lead the editorial team for the three-year-old website and online community All Analytics. Connolly, who was named editor-in-chief, previously had been executive editor on A2 and editor of other UBM Tech properties such as Storage Acceleration, The Enterprise Cloud Site, Big Data Republic, and The Future of Work Enabled.
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Holiday Notice
This is to inform our esteemed subscribers that there will be no newsletter dispatch on October 22, 2014 on account of Local holiday. We will resume our newsletter service on Thursday, October 23, 2014. The newsletter will contain all the headlines that have appeared after the October 21st issue.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

NASA Spacecraft Are Now Sending Back Data On Comet Encounter.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/20, Khan) “Science Now” website reports that NASA’s three orbiters about Mars are sending back data on Comet Siding Spring following its pass by the planet on Sunday. MAVEN, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and the Mars Odyssey were “unscathed” following the pass, and the data is expected to be processed over the next couple of days.

New Scientist Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/20, Graham) reported that with every Mars spacecraft safe, scientists are “revelling in the unexpected opportunity” to view a comet making its first pass into the interior of the solar system. Researchers are also reportedly exited by what the comet could reveal about Mars’ atmosphere.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/20, Porter) posted an interview with Glen Nagle from the CSIRO/NASA tracking station, who similarly explained the scientific value of the comet, both in and of itself and what it could reveal about Mars.

Higher Education

Columnist: For-Profit Colleges Target Students Of Color.

In a column for the NNPA Black Press of America Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/21), Charlene Crowell notes that ED is preparing to announce “a new rule governing career education programs,” adding that the Center for Responsible Lending “has released research that finds high-cost, for-profit colleges make millions each year by targeting students of color.” She notes that such colleges make most of their money through “taxpayer funding,” and “their students incur heavy debts with low graduation rates and nearly no marketable skills.”

For-Profit College Grads Detail Their Experiences In Debt With Limited Prospects.

The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/19, Woolhouse) details the stories of a handful of students who attended for-profit colleges on student loans, only to become indebted tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars with limited job prospects due to a lack of recognition for their degrees. The piece portrays the misleading advertisements of a few featured schools to entice enrollment through the promise of better careers, which one student felt “took advantage of” her desperation.

From ASEE
ASEE-Developed Resources for K-12 Teachers of Engineering
Comprehensive details on teacher prep and a professional development matrix are found here.

ASEE Perks
ASEE launches “ASEE Perks” a new collection of discounted products and services, only for members.

ASEE Members on Professional Leadership Opportunities
Watch the short video

Continue reading
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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

International Open Access Week shines spotlight on increasing the impact of scientific research
Hundreds of events will take place across the globe to highlight the power that Open Access has to increase the impact of scientific and scholarly research during the seventh annual Open Access Week taking place from October 20-26, 2014. This year’s theme of ‘Generation Open’ highlights the important role that students and early career researchers play as advocates for change, both in the short-term through institutional and governmental policy, and also as the future of the Academy upon whom the ultimate success of the Open Access movement depends.
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Access to finance biggest obstacle for innovation, says TISP, Frankfurt Book Fair survey
The EU-funded network Technology and Innovation for Smart Publishing (TISP), in cooperation with the Frankfurt Book Fair, recently conducted a qualitative survey among European book publishers. The survey revealed that innovation is of great importance to book publishers. Almost three quarters (77%) of the over 120 respondents to a Europe-wide qualitative survey said they are developing new products and services.
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SAGE set to publish Healthcare Management Forum starting in 2015
Academic publisher SAGE and the Canadian College of Health Leaders have announced that SAGE will begin publishing the College’s journal, Healthcare Management Forum (HMF), with the first edition in January 2015. The journal publishes articles on leading practices related to health leadership and management, including recent research, new technology and professional practices from health leaders’ perspectives.
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Cegedim Board approves IMS Health’s offer to purchase Cegedim’s Information Solutions and CRM businesses
Information and technology services company IMS Health has announced that following successful completion of works council information and consultation requirements in certain countries, the Cegedim Board of Directors has approved IMS Health’s offer to acquire certain Cegedim information solutions and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) businesses. A definitive purchase agreement has been executed.
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Brill launches Brill Open Social Sciences
International scholarly publisher Brill has announced the launch of its new broad open access journal in the social sciences. Brill Open Social Sciences – An International Journal is now open for submissions. Submitted papers are subject to double-blind peer review and accepted only if methodologically sound and relevant.
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Information Today, Inc. webinar focuses on how the discovery ecosystem involves much more than the single search box
A recent Information Today, Inc. webinar, sponsored by ProQuest, discussion focused on how the discovery ecosystem involves much more than the single search box and the content that libraries make available to their users. Attention focused on the increasing role that librarians can play by embedding themselves within the researcher workflow, along with contextual guidance and new tools to help researchers at the point of need.
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OCLC Research, CNI and the George Washington University Libraries to co-sponsor Evolving Scholarly Record workshop
The Evolving Scholarly Record workshop, co-sponsored by OCLC Research, the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), and the George Washington University Libraries, builds on the framework presented in the OCLC Research report, The Evolving Scholarly Record. Scheduled for December 10, 2014, at Washington, DC, this is the second in a series of Evolving Scholarly Record workshops. The first was held in Amsterdam on June 10, 2014.
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Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Kent Anderson (Virtual Reality Research — Some Early Problems with Data Reanalysis and Risks of Open Data); Andrew Farke (Which (non-open access) journals can paleontologists access?); Bonnie Swoger (Correcting the scientific record: An introduction to retractions); Joseph Esposito (Revisiting Demand-driven Acquisitions); and Ben Lee (Public libraries play a central role in providing access to data and ensuring the freedom of digital knowledge). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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Leading the News

Georgia State University College Of Education Receives $7.5 Million Federal Grant.

The Digital Journal  (10/20) reports the US Department of Education has awarded the Georgia State University College of Education $7.5 million for its Collaboration and Resources for Encouraging and Supporting Transformations in Education program. The program is designed to increase the number of teachers committed to high-need schools in urban and rural settings by partnering partner with Albany State University, Columbus State University, the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, and nine county school systems to recruit, train and support 250-300 students who want to teach in STEM fields in conjunction with the college’s Federally funded Network for Chancing Teacher Quality. The college and its partners will also pair graduates with mentors, offer professional development, and provide support.

Higher Education

New College Rating System May Use Flawed Graduation Rates.

An analysis in the Chronicle of Higher Education  (10/20) reports on speculation that new US Department of Education college-ratings will include graduation rates only including first-time, full-time students to graduate within a certain time frame. First-time, full-time students comprised only 55% of students newly enrolled in 2012 and only 41% at community colleges, excluding millions. The piece moves onto better data collected by the National Student Clearinghouse, which follows students over longer periods and across schools, doubling community college graduation rates. The clearinghouse can only provide the data to the Education Department with institutions’ permission, however, while lawmakers currently only allow for students who received Federal grants or loans to be included.

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