California Agricultural Experiment Station Digitization

http://tinyurl.com/nd8w6bk

UC Davis Library grant funded project of Cal Ag Experiment Station publications hosted on the Internet Archive got a little help spreading the word today:

@UCDavisRockwell

retweeted by @UCDavis_Egghead

and

@may_gun

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

NISO unveils new Primer Series with the publication of Primer on Research Data Management
The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has launched a new Primer Series on information management technology issues with the publication of the first primer on the topic of Research Data Management. Two more primers on the topics of Understanding Metadata and Linked Data for Cultural Institutions, respectively, will be released in the coming months, with additional Primers to be published periodically.
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Registration for ORCID Outreach Meeting and Codefest now open
ORCID, a researcher identifier solution which enables a wide range of improvements to the scholarly communications ecosystem, has announced that the next Outreach Meeting and Codefest will take place on November 3-4 at the San Francisco headquarters of GitHub. The theme of the meeting is Research Information Innovation: Entrepreneurs and ORCID.
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American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers to preserve e-journals with Portico
Digital preservation specialist Portico has announced that the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) will preserve their e-journals with Portico. With this move ASABE seeks to ensure that its journals will be secure and available into the future.
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ARL/SAA Mosaic Program hosts second annual Leadership Forum at SAA Meeting
The 2014–2016 ARL/Society of American Archivists (SAA) Mosaic Program fellows participated in the second annual Mosaic Leadership Forum on August 18, 2015, during the SAA Annual Meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. The daylong Mosaic Leadership Forum focused on leadership in the archives profession, increasing diversity in the field, and involvement in professional organisations at SAA and beyond. The event also included a practical session on job interview techniques and strategies for transitioning into the professional archives workforce.
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Curtin University in Australia joins Ex Libris Leganto early-adopter program
Library automation solutions provider Ex Libris® Group has announced that Curtin University in Australia has joined the early-adopter program for the Leganto reading-list solution. Tightly integrated with an institution’s course management, library management, and discovery systems, as well as with third party systems and services, Leganto supports automated cross-system workflows and forms a collaborative, engaging environment for instructors and students.
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Research Solutions, Inc. announces summer 2015 product release of Article Galaxy
Research Solutions, Inc. has announced the summer 2015 product release of the journal content access and management platform Article Galaxy by subsidiary Reprints Desk, Inc., featuring breakthroughs in research workflow efficiencies. Research Solutions is a pioneer in providing on-demand access to scientific, technical and medical (STM) information for life science companies, academic institutions, and other research-intensive organisations.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Rochester Professor Receives Grants For Laser Research With Potential Military Uses.

The Rochester (NY) Democrat & Chronicle  (8/31, Brooks) reports University of Rochester professor Chunlei Guo has been awarded two grants to continue his research on a specialized laser. Guo received a $330,000 grant from the US Army Research Office and a $100,000 grant from the New York State Energy Research and Development Agency. US Representative Louise Slaughter, who represents the district that includes Rochester, helped the professor get the grants. The Rochester (NY) Business Journal  (8/31, Gable) explains that the specialized laser can make materials very hydrophilic or hydrophobic, so that they attract or repel water. The laser has a military application because it could be used to protect military vehicles and equipment from corrosion and other types of water damage. Hydrophilic materials could also be useful for liquid cooling and medical research applications.

Corning Joins Advanced Tech Consortium At RIT.

The Rochester (NY) Business Journal  (9/1, Gable) reports that officials at the Rochester Institute of Technology announced Monday that “a new center for advanced technology in additive manufacturing and functional printing” will be housed there. The AMPrint Center for Advanced Technology will be a consortium of universities and corporations including Corning, Xerox, and GE Research, and will be focused on performing R&D “in 3D printing and additive manufacturing,” the Business Journal says. The Rochester (NY) Democrat & Chronicle  (9/1) also provides brief coverage.

Higher Education

Report: California Community Colleges Need “Kinder, Gentler” Accreditor.

The Chronicle of Higher Education  (9/1) reports that a new report commissioned by California’s community college system indicates that the system “needs a new, kinder, gentler accreditor,” even as some politicians “are calling for accreditors to get tougher with higher education and not let poor-performing colleges off the hook.” The report was commissioned in response to “a bruising legal battle over the accreditation of the City College of San Francisco.” The piece explains that the report says that the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges “has been uncooperative, resistant to repeated calls for change and disrespectful of the governing structures and processes of its member institutions.” The article notes that the agency’s efforts to remove CCSF’s accreditation “set off a political firestorm, involving the region’s state legislators, members of Congress and the U.S. Department of Education.”

Inside Higher Ed  (8/31) reports that the agency’s “future looks murky,” noting that ED and key members of Congress have criticized it “over its handling of City College’s sanctions.” The piece notes that the community college system’s chancellor “has for the most part refrained from directly challenging the accreditor’s authority,” but paints the report as a break from this reticence.

College Professor Explains Why Students With Smaller Debts Are More Likely To Default.

In a New York Times  (8/31, Subscription Publication) piece, University of Michigan Professor Susan Dynarski explains that the common perception that people with the most student loan debt are most likely to default is inaccurate. The professor of education, public policy, and economics points out that those with the most debt tend to be people who completed graduate degrees and with their higher earnings are typically able to pay off their higher debts. Dynarski then explains how people with low student debt who only earned a bachelor’s degree or who dropped out of college before completing a degree are much more likely to default even though they tend to have smaller debts compared to others who completed graduate school.

From ASEE
ASEE Annual Conference VIDEOS

Kai Kight
Dynamic speaker and violinist Kai Kight performs and talks about how he merges music and inspirtaion.

Maria Klawe
The Havery Mudd President’s keynote address focused on the school’s efforts toward diversity.

Research and Development

NSF Awards $380,000 Grant To Two Wichita State University Professors To Study Cybersecurity For Wearables.

KMUW-FM  Wichita, KS (8/31, Sandefur) reports the National Science Foundation awarded two Wichita State University professors a $380,000 grant to study the security of data stored in wearable technology like Apple Watches or FitBits. Professor Murtuza Jadliwala of the university’s electrical engineering and computer science department said, “We should know more about the technology that we’re using every day. I think the threat from these devices is real.”

RaD-X Balloon Flight To Help Confirm NAIRAS Model.

The Newport News (VA) Daily Press  (9/1, Dietrich, Subscription Publication) reports that the Langley Research Center will be launching a science balloon from New Mexico to gather “good, quantitative measure for exactly how much radiation” those flying receive, according to Langley’s Kevin Daugherty. The Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) will collaborate with a German Aerospace Center research plane to confirm the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS), “the first physics-based analytical model to determine biologically harmful radiation levels in aviation in real time,” which will also be helpful in tracking the radiation exposure of astronauts at the ISS. The mission will also have 100 experiments from the Cubes in Space student program, which Daugherty said consists of “just about everything they can think of.”

DARPA Announces “Gremlins” Drone Program.

Defense Systems  (8/31) reports the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has announced a program to study the feasibility of operating relatively cheap drones that can launch from and return to other larger aircraft. Called “Gremlins,” cheaper attack vehicles would inhabit a middle ground between missiles that totally lose their expensive components in use and current reusable systems meant to stay in use for decades. DARPA has announced a Proposers Day for September 24 for the program.

Engineering and Public Policy

Shell To Resume Operations In Arctic After Storm Forced Temporary Halt.

The AP  (9/1) reports that after Royal Dutch Shell temporarily halted exploratory drilling in the Arctic Ocean due to high winds and rough seas over the weekend, company spokesman Curtis Smith “says in a Monday email to The Associated Press that full operations, including drilling, will start again once a systems check is complete and the company is satisfied it’s safe to start drilling again.” Smith “says there’s no timeline for that to be completed.”

Offshore Engineer  (8/31, Sustaita) reported that Shell “disconnected the Noble Discoverer semisubmersible from its anchors in the Chukchi Sea” due to the weekend’s weather. Shell spokesperson Natalie Mazey told OE, “We made the decision to disconnect the Noble Discoverer from its anchors and weather the storm in the Chukchi Sea using engine power. As safety is paramount to Shell, we will resume operations as soon as it is safe to do so.”

Natural Gas Europe  (9/1, Matalucci) also noted the temporary suspension of operations for safety reasons.

EPA Plans To Reduce Flushing Of Pharmaceutical Waste.

The Washington Times  (9/1, Wolfgang) reports the EPA said Monday that it “will dramatically limit the flushing of pharmaceutical waste at hospitals and other health-care facilities as part of a larger effort to improve water quality across the country.” The proposal “will prevent the flushing of at least 6,400 tons of pharmaceutical waste each year,” according to an EPA statement.

Obama Defends Clean Power Plan Against Challenge From States.

Bloomberg News  (8/31, Harris) reports that “the Obama administration has called a multistate effort to delay its 15-year plan to reduce carbon emissions ‘premature’ and ‘unwarranted.’” On Monday the government said in court papers that “the states face no irreparable harm from the deadlines proposed in the Clean Power Plan.” The new rules “aim to slow climate change by dropping U.S. power plant carbon dioxide emissions 32 percent below their 2005 levels by 2030.” Fifteen states have “asked a federal court in Washington to issue an order delaying deadlines for submission of their plans to reach that objective.”

OMB Begins Final Review Of EPA’s Ozone Pollution Rule.

The Hill  (8/31, Cama) reports on Monday the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) said it had received the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) controversial ozone pollution rule on Friday and had begun the final review process. While in November the EPA proposed cutting the ground-level ozone standard to the range of 65 to 70 parts per billion, the agency said “It will not reveal the number it chose until it reveals the final version of the regulation.” The Hill adds that “The administration agreed in court to release the regulation by Oct. 1, giving the OMB just over a month to complete” its review.

DOE Proposing New Standards For Battery Chargers.

The Hill  (8/31, Devaney) reports the Energy Department “is proposing new efficiency standards for battery chargers.” The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the Energy Department “is revising a 2012 proposal of new energy conservation standards for battery chargers to account for similar rules issued in California.” The agency “estimates the changes could cost manufacturers $529 million, but will save consumers as much as $1.2 billion.” The public will have the chance to comment for the next 30 days.

Study Suggests How To Reduce Impact Of Renewable Energy Projects On Wildlife.

The Washington Post  (9/1, Warrick) reports that, in a study published in PLOS ONE, researchers Brad Fedy and Jason Tack examined data on wind patterns and known golden eagle nesting sites in Wyoming and then “successfully identified ‘sweet spots,’ places far removed from nesting grounds but directly in the path of prevailing winds.” Fedy, a professor of environmental studies at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, said their findings demonstrate “that it’s possible to guide development of sustainable energy projects, while having the least impact on wildlife populations.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Style Engineers Program Expanding Outside New York To Teach Girls About STEM Through Fashion Design.

The Cornell Chronicle (NY)  (8/31, Boscia) reports the National Science Foundation funds a program run by Cornell University and the University of Minnesota called Style Engineers that teaches middle school girls about STEM fields in the context of fashion design. The program is expanding nationwide after initially being tested in New York this summer at two 4-H camps in the state as well as the YWCA of Syracuse and Onondaga County. Style Engineers was previously named “Smart Clothing, Smart Girls.”

West Virginia Test Scores Show STEM Deficit Among Students.

The West Virginia MetroNews  (8/31, Kercheval) reports West Virginia’s latest student test scores on the ACT science section, the Smarter Balanced standardized test, and the Westest test show that West Virginia students are below average in their knowledge of STEM. Only 34% of West Virginia students who took the ACT and graduated in 2015 were college-ready in math or science, compared to 42% or 38% nationwide.

Monday’s Lead Stories

Administration “Strongly Disagrees” With Injunction Against Clean Water Rules.
Virginia Tech Engineering Professors Working To Streamline Time To Degree.
Researchers Working On New Generation Of Battery Technology.
Town’s Officials Call On EPA To Clean Up Radioactive Waste.
Apps Can Help Kids Regain Science Knowledge After Summer Vacation.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Wolters Kluwer’s Clinical Drug Information solutions used in 25 out of the 27 top-scoring hospitals in the US
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced that its Clinical Drug Information solutions are used in 25 out of the 27 top-scoring hospitals achieving Honor Roll status in U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals and Best Children’s Hospitals 2015-2016 rankings. Additionally, its Lexicomp drug references are used by 19 of the 20 top-ranked pediatric hospitals for neonatology from the U.S. News & World Report 2015-2016 Best Children’s Hospitals list.
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Center for Open Science’s Reproducibility Project finds several studies not replicable
A four-year study published in Science Magazine on August 27, 2015, found that fewer than half of 100 published findings of three prominent psychology journals were reproducible. The 270 researchers who collaborated on the Reproducibility Project: Psychology coordinated by the Center for Open Science (COS) – one of ARL’s three partners in SHARE – were able to replicate the findings of only 39 of the 100 original studies. Reproducibility is necessary for scientific evidence to be credible.
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Cochrane appoints Karla Soares Weiser as Deputy Editor in Chief
Cochrane, a global independent network of researchers, professionals, patients, carers, and people interested in health, has announced the appointment of Karla Soares Weiser as Deputy Editor in Chief. This newly created post will combine leadership roles within the Cochrane Editorial Unit (CEU) and Cochrane Innovations, helping to ensure that the CEU can deliver on its targets and projects, and supporting Charlotte Pestridge, the CEO of Cochrane Innovations, by leading the editorial development of new business products and services for Cochrane.
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National Library of Medicine releases new web page – Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new web page – Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability. The web page is a resource for nurses, students, informaticians and anyone interested in nursing terminologies for systems development. It describes the role of SNOMED CT and Laboratory Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) in implementing Meaningful Use in the United States, specifically for the nursing and care domain.
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K-12 parents welcome digital learning as a performance-improving and more cost-effective learning experience for their children, says McGraw-Hill survey
McGraw-Hill Education, a learning science company, has released the results of a survey, according to which, parents of K-12 and college-age students overwhelmingly support digital learning as a means to enhance the classroom learning experience for their children. When asked about digital learning, a resounding 91 percent of K-12 parents said they welcomed the introduction of a more personalised digital experience as an alternative to traditional textbooks.
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Students using Cengage Learning’s digital course solutions in Calculus to gain access to live Chegg Tutors anytime
Chegg, Inc. (CHGG), the Student Hub, and Cengage Learning, a global education company, have announced a partnership to integrate Chegg Tutors directly into Cengage Learning’s leading calculus materials. Students using Cengage Learning’s digital course solutions in calculus will now have direct access to live, online tutors who can offer assistance in the precise content currently being studied.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Administration “Strongly Disagrees” With Injunction Against Clean Water Rules.

Reuters  (8/29, Rampton) reports White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Friday the Administration “strongly disagrees” with the decision of a US District court to approve a preliminary injunction blocking the Federal clean water regulations from being implemented in 13 states. Earnest said the Justice Department is considering its response.

Judge Approves Subpoena Against Former EPA Official Over Alaskan Gold Mine. The Washington Post  (8/29, Warrick) reports a US district judge on Thursday “approved a request for a subpoena compelling a former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) official to explain his actions in the agency’s controversial decision to prevent a proposed gold mine from being built in southwestern Alaska,” which “set[s] the stage for a potentially dramatic confrontation between former EPA biologist Phillip North and the would-be developers of the Pebble Mine, about 200 miles southwest of Anchorage.”

Higher Education

Virginia Tech Engineering Professors Working To Streamline Time To Degree.

The Augusta (VA) Free Press  (8/31) reports that amid rising college costs, “two Virginia Tech engineering education professors are investigating helpful strategies for avoiding pitfalls that prolong completion times when pursuing doctoral degrees.” The faculty have received a $1.28 million NSF grant “to offer a Dissertation Institute to evaluate issues that could lead to shortening a student’s time to earn a doctoral degree.” The professors “will focus on studying a group of 170 underrepresented students pursuing doctoral degrees in engineering through attending a Dissertation Institute.”

Corinthian Bankruptcy Ruling Could Aid Former Students.

The Chronicle of Higher Education  (8/28, Blumenstyk) reports that a recent decision in the Corinthian Colleges Inc. bankruptcy case could “improve the chances” that hundreds of thousands of the firm’s former students “won’t have to repay” their Federal student loans. The piece notes that this could come to billions of dollars, but adds that ED officials “said it was premature to speculate on how such legal actions might affect loan-relief requests.” The piece explains that the US bankruptcy court ruled that CFPB and state attorneys general can “continue to pursue their legal cases against the company.”

Inside Higher Ed  (8/27, Stratford) reports that the former students who are calling for loan forgiveness won $4 million from the court “to continue to press their case – and possibly haul the department into court over the issue.” The money comes from the liquidation of Corinthian’s assets.

From ASEE
ASEE Annual Conference VIDEOS

Kai Kight
Dynamic speaker and violinist Kai Kight performs and talks about how he merges music and inspirtaion.

Maria Klawe
The Havery Mudd President’s keynote address focused on the school’s efforts toward diversity.

Research and Development

Researchers Working On New Generation Of Battery Technology.

The Christian Science Monitor  (8/30, Unger) has a 3,500-word feature on the “new battery revolution” that is underway as scientists seek “cleaner, more efficient, and more equitable” energy sources for everything from smartphones to automobiles and urban power grids. The Monitor says “the question is whether the next generation of batteries will be cheap enough and have enough storage to make the electric car and home energy systems as omnipresent as the iPhone.”

NASA Continues To Study Rising Sea Levels.

The Washington Post  (8/30) reports that NASA released on Wednesday “a suite of new graphics and visualizations showing how precisely” scientists are “measuring the upward creep of the oceans, currently at a rate of 3.21 millimeters per year.” One slide that garnered particular attention showed how Greenland is “losing ice mass considerably faster than Antarctica is, to the tune of several hundred gigatons a year.” NASA’s study of Greenland “entails two major types of research — studying the melting that is occurring on top of the ice sheet, and studying the melting of its outlying, oceanfront glaciers.”

Scientists, Washington State Tribe Study Retreating Glaciers. The AP  (8/29, Le) reports that scientists and the Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington state are studying the “thinning and retreating” glaciers in the North Cascades. Experts claim that “seven have disappeared over the past three decades, and glaciers in the range have lost about one-fifth of their overall volume.” The Nooksack Indian Tribe has teamed up with Mauri Pelto, a glaciologist from Nichols College in Massachusetts, and Western Washington University to study “how glacier runoff will affect the [Nooksack River’s] hydrology and ultimately fish habitat and restoration planning.”

ONR Gives Cal State LA $1 Million In STEM Research Grants.

Civil and Structural Engineer  (8/31) reports that the Office of Naval Research has given Cal State L.A.’s College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology a $580,000 grant to “develop a Naval STEM Program within the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology.” The program’s goal “is to provide a pipeline of high quality graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields who will be prepared for civilian jobs in the Navy.”

DOE Gives University At Buffalo Carbon Capture Research Grant.

The Buffalo (NY) Business First  (8/27, Subscription Publication) reports that the Department of Energy is giving the University at Buffalo and partners a $1.9 million grant “to develop carbon capture technologies.” Researchers are working on “a membrane that will allow hydrogen to pass through and keep carbon dioxide out.”

Engineering and Public Policy

Town’s Officials Call On EPA To Clean Up Radioactive Waste.

The Hill  (8/29, Cama) reported that Bridgeton, Missouri officials are calling on the White House “to quickly clean up” the EPA-monitored West Lake Landfill, which contains radioactive waste from the Manhattan Project, due to concerns that a fire in a nearby landfill could spread to the waste,” potentially sending it airborne and spreading it in an unpredictable way.” According to The Hill, the EPA has responded, saying “the situation is not as urgent or dire as some have made it out to be.”

Fiorina: EPA Regulations Have “Decimated” Agriculture Industries. The Hill  (8/29, Hesnch) reported in its “Ballot Box” blog that Carly Fiorina on Saturday said the EPA “is strangling the life out of many agriculture industries with over-regulation.” Fiorina said she has seen California’s agricultural sector “almost destroyed…by bad policies and bad politics.” The article noted that Fiorina “vowed” to let the EPA’s renewable fuel standard to expire in 2022, saying “Fossil fuels, sugar, corn subsidies – government needs to get out of all of it.”

Opinion: House Must Approve DRIVE Act.

In the St. Cloud (MN) Times  (8/30), Scott Mareck, a senior transportation planner with SB & Associates, a transportation planning and civil engineering firm, writes in support of the DRIVE Act. According to Mareck, the bill is necessary because it provides a long-term federal transportation authorization bill, unlike the short-term extensions in recent years, which have “made it difficult for state departments of transportation and local governments to develop long-term transportation plans and short-term construction programs.” Mareck concludes the piece by asking readers to contact their Congress member and urge him or him to approve the bill.

WSJournal: Solar Industry Is Gouging Taxpayers.

In an editorial, the Wall Street Journal  (8/31, Journal, Subscription Publication) notes a report from the Energy Department’s Inspector General which found that solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra lied to obtain a $535 million loan guarantee. The Journal says it as an example of the solar industry gouging the American people with the help of the Obama Administration.

Obama May Back Louisiana Use Of Offshore Oil Revenue For Coastal Restoration.

The New Orleans Times-Picayune  (8/28) reports that “President Barack Obama held out hope to state officials on Thursday (Aug. 27) in New Orleans that his administration might back down from plans to redirect 35 percent of federal offshore oil and gas revenue from Louisiana and other Gulf Coast states to the general budget, according to a news release issued late Thursday by the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority.” According to the article, “Obama told CPRA Chairman Chip Kline that he’s willing ‘to work with Louisiana and other Gulf states to create a mechanism for sharing of federal offshore oil and gas revenues.’” Obama told Kline “he would like to see Louisiana receive its fair share of revenue, but has concerns about guaranteeing that individual states will use the money for its intended environmental purposes.”

O’Malley Believes He Has Different Opinion On Keystone Than Clinton.

The Washington Examiner  (8/30, Westwood) reports that former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley “has spent the weekend blasting his own party.” Less than two days “after O’Malley lambasted the Democratic National Committee for its restrictive primary debate schedule directly in front of DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, O’Malley took jabs at a new target: Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton.” In an interview with WMUR–TV in New Hampshire, he “criticized Clinton for sidestepping on a number of issues.” O’Malley said, “For my part, I have underscored the differences I have with Secretary Clinton on the Trans Pacific Partnership. … I’m against it, I believe she’s for it. I’m against Keystone pipeline. I believe that she’s for it.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Apps Can Help Kids Regain Science Knowledge After Summer Vacation.

The New York Times  (8/30, Dell’Antonia) reports that apps can help children regain knowledge lost over the summer by teaching them more about math and science in a fun way. The article lists several apps designed to teach children.

New Hampshire Program Encourages Academic Challenges, Gives Students More Class Options.

The AP  (8/31) reports the NH Scholars program in New Hampshire is increasing class options for high school students. The program, operated by the New Hampshire College and University Council and sponsored by local businesses, encourages students to take more difficult courses to prepare for college and future careers. The director of the program Scott Power said, “We know the business community needs graduates who are skilled in STEM programs, but we also recognize the value of arts to our communities and our culture. Students deserve options.”

South Carolina County Will Offer New STEM Education Program For Elementary School Students.

The Anderson (SC) Independent-Mail  (8/29, Jackson) reports Project Lead the Way will give elementary school students at seven schools in Pickens County, South Carolina “hands-on education in problem solving, touch technology, and robotics as well as explore topics such as energy, light, sound, motion and gravity.” Project Lead the Way is a national STEM education program.

Virginia County Career And Technical Education Classes Offering Valuable Opportunities To Students.

The Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch  (8/29, Cocke) reports the quality of career and technology education in Henrico County, Virginia has greatly improved. The article says that whereas shop classes used to have a “reputation for less demanding coursework”, CTE courses today attract “highly motivated and academically accomplished young people taught by nationally award-winning instructors.” The article also says that CTE is helping to fulfill the need for skilled workers.

Friday’s Lead Stories

Federal Judge Blocks EPA Waterway Rule.
Audit Finds Potentially Costly Financial Aid Lapses At Pennsylvania College.
Ohio Bill Would Require Continuing Ethics Education For Engineers.
NSF Gives $2 Million Grant For Engineering Research To UC Berkeley.
Missouri University Joins Initiative To Increase Diversity In Engineering.
Civil Engineers Use Drones To Monitor Construction Sites.
White House Says Keystone Decision Not Imminent.

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Frankfurt Book Fair to host THE MARKETS – Global Publishing Summit 2015
THE MARKETS – Global Publishing Summit 2015, the new conference to kick off the Frankfurt Book Fair (14-18 October 2015) will set the stage for the world’s largest industry event. The one-day conference will focus on seven international book markets, which will be introduced by industry experts and analysed from various points of view, with the aim of initiating deals on the spot as well as bringing to light potential areas for business.
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Wolters Kluwer to showcase Health Language Terminology Management Solutions at Epic User Group Meeting
The Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has announced that its Health Language® workflow enhancing search and data normalisation solutions will be featured at the Epic User Group Meeting, August 31-September 4 in Verona, Wis. Located at the Epic Observation Deck in Booth #224, Wolters Kluwer will be demonstrating its cutting-edge solution for simplifying clinician documentation of problem lists and diagnoses.
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Arkansas State Library selects LearningExpress for Online Resources
LearningExpress, an EBSCO company, has announced that the Arkansas State Library has selected LearningExpress Library and Computer Skills Center digital platforms to address the increasing need for workplace skills improvement, and to help all Arkansas residents achieve their academic, career and personal goals. LearningExpress Library with Computer Skills Center includes more than 1,000 online tutorials, interactive practice tests, eBooks and computer skills videos.
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Frontiers articles now include CrossMark and FundRef data
Swiss open-access publisher Frontiers has announced that beginning this month, Frontiers articles will now include CrossMark and FundRef data when applicable. CrossMark lets people know whether or not they are reading the most recent version of a document. The CrossMark logo will appear on all Frontiers articles published after August 24.
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Crossref appoints Jennifer Lin to its management team as Director of Product Management
Crossref, the not-for profit organisation that runs the metadata engine for scholarly content, has announced the appointment of Jennifer Lin to its management team in the newly-created position of Director of Product Management. In this role Jennifer will be responsible for overseeing all stages of product development, maintaining the existing portfolio of services, and keeping her finger on the pulse of developments in scholarly communications.
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PubMatch extends current exhibiting partnership with London Book Fair
PubMatch, the premium global rights trading platform for the book publishing industry, has announced an extension of its current exhibiting partnership with the London Book Fair to encompass a year-round, online service for those involved in the buying, selling and marketing of copyrights and intellectual property (IP). The London Book Fair service, GLOBAL RIGHTS 365@LBF, will facilitate IP trading across books and the wider brand licensing universes including TV, film and gaming across all territories.
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Cengage Learning unveils student-centric app, MindTap Mobile, for on-the-go learning
Cengage Learning, a leading global education company, has launched the availability of the iOS and Android compatible MindTap Mobile app. Developed based on student feedback, MindTap Mobile allows students to access many features of Cengage Learning’s highly successful MindTap e-learning platform directly from their smartphones anytime, anywhere.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Federal Judge Blocks EPA Waterway Rule.

The AP  (8/28) reports that US District Judge Ralph Erickson in Fargo, North Dakota on Thursday blocked a new Obama Administration rule “that would give the federal government jurisdiction over some state waterways.” Erickson issued a temporary injunction against the rule, which would have given the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers authority “over some streams, tributaries and wetlands under the Clean Water Act.” The rule was scheduled to take effect today. In granting the request of 13 states to block the rule from taking effect, Erickson wrote, “The risk of irreparable harm to the states is both imminent and likely.”

The Wall Street Journal  (8/28, Harder, Kendall, Subscription Publication) reports that Erickson said the states are likely to succeed in their lawsuit challenging the rule, and he said the rule had the “fatal defect” of allowing regulation of ditches and streams situated far from navigable waters over which federal authorities have jurisdiction. The Washington Times  (8/28, Dinan) reports that Erickson called the rule “inexplicable, arbitrary and devoid of a reasoned process.” The Times notes that the EPA said in a statement that “it will only honor the injunction in the 13 states that had sued, and will move forward with the rules in the rest of the country. ‘In all other respects, the rule is effective on August 28,’ the agency said in a statement.”

Higher Education

Audit Finds Potentially Costly Financial Aid Lapses At Pennsylvania College.

The Philadelphia Inquirer  (8/28, Snyder) reports that the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education has released an audit of member school Cheyney University, a historically black university in Delaware and Chester counties, finding that the school “failed to follow federal financial aid regulations and may owe the government more than $29 million.” The school had inadequate records for nearly half of financial aid recipients, and “could not substantiate that some students receiving aid were making the required progress toward a degree.” The Inquirer reports that the agency will turn the audit over to ED, which will determine “how much the school owes and what penalties should be assessed.”

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette  (8/28, Chute) reports that the review “found at least one error in 85 percent of the records for federal grants and loans over a three-year period, placing the awarding of $29.6 million in question.” The paper reports that the improperly handled funds include “Pell grants, TEACH, direct loans, PLUS loans, federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and work study.” The firm Financial Aid Services Inc., which conducted the audit for the state, has contracted to run the school’s financial aid office.

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review  (8/28, Erdley) reports that state taxpayers could ultimately be responsible for the money, noting that state officials said that the 14-month audit found that “Cheyney officials failed to document that students were eligible for $29.6 million in federal grants and loans.” The AP  (8/28) also covers this story.

Efforts To Address College Affordability Debated.

In an editorial, USA Today  (8/28) says that while the leading Democratic presidential candidates have offered plans “they say will make colleges more affordable and provide debt relief for millennials,” the plans would “throw more federal money at colleges while offering little but hope that these institutions would hold expenses down.” USA Today argues that to address the issue of college affordability, rising tuition must be attacked “at its root cause,” adding, “The Democratic candidates need a little more educating on this.”

In an accompanying USA Today  (8/28, Austin) op-ed, Barmak Nassirian, director of policy analysis with the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, criticizes the “steady erosion of state support” for higher education, which has “shifted more of the cost to students and families.” Nassirian credits the Democratic presidential candidates for “correctly identif[ying] the state disinvestment trend as the primary driver of the tuition spiral,” adding that their proposals “would decisively deal with real college affordability.”

Bankruptcy Judge Approves Corinthian Liquidation Plan, Sets Aside Money For Students To Pursue Debt Relief.

Inside Higher Ed  (8/27, Stratford) reports a federal bankruptcy judge approved Corinthian Colleges’ plan to liquidate its assets while setting aside $4.3 million in a special fund to “pursue discharges of billions of dollars of federal students loans” for the schools’ former students. The student committee in the bankruptcy said they will continue to negotiate with the Education Department to try to receive widespread debt forgiveness, but if those negotiations fail then they will consider litigation. Education Department officials have already announced that they will “fast-track the debt relief applications of certain students who attended Corinthian-owned Heald College” because the ED already has sufficient evidence to determine that Heald misled students, but that they will need more time to decide how to handle debt relief applications for students that attended other Corinthian schools. Reuters  (8/27, Goenka) also covers the story giving more background. Corinthian shut down all of its remaining schools this April and then filed for bankruptcy in May.

NSF Gives $400,000 Grant To Promote STEM Education, Careers To Historically Black College.

Greensboro (NC) News & Record  (8/27) reports the National Science Foundation awarded a $400,000 grant to Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina to help students at the school take STEM courses and pursue STEM careers. The grant is part of NSF’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program.

Utah State University Names Engineering Building For Local Alum.

The Logan (UT) Herald Journal  (8/28) reports that Utah State University has named a new engineering building after local alumnus Richard Anderson, who “spent 40 years at Hewlett-Packard before retiring as a senior vice president, held up his smartphone.” The building “features ‘14 classrooms, eight teaching laboratories, a ‘student success center’ and computer lab,’ according to a USU news release.” The Cache Valley (UT) Daily  (8/28) also covers this story.

From ASEE
ASEE Annual Conference VIDEOS

Kai Kight
Dynamic speaker and violinist Kai Kight performs and talks about how he merges music and inspirtaion.

Maria Klawe
The Havery Mudd President’s keynote address focused on the school’s efforts toward diversity.

Accreditation and Professional Development

Ohio Bill Would Require Continuing Ethics Education For Engineers.

The Columbus (OH) Daily Reporter  (8/28, Parks) reports that Ohio State Reps. Louis Blessing III and Al Landis introduced a bill that “require professional engineers to complete continuing professional development hours in professional ethics or rules.” The bill before the Ohio General Assembly notes “six fundamental canons” that professional engineers must uphold and would require engineers to allocate “at least two of the already required 30 hours of continuing professional development” to professional ethics.

Research and Development

NSF Gives $2 Million Grant For Engineering Research To UC Berkeley.

KRON-TV  San Francisco (8/27, Adams) reports the National Science Foundation’s Emerging Frontiers and Multidisciplinary Activities program will award a $2 million grant to the University of California at Berkeley to support “researchers engaged in advanced fundamental engineering research.” The grant was announced by Rep. Barbara Lee of California.

NSF, Northeastern University Recognized With Sarcastic Award For Wasteful Government Spending.

The Washington Times  (8/28, Howell) reports it is awarding its weekly “Golden Hammer” award for wasteful government spending to the National Science Foundation and Northeastern University over a $8.4 million research grant for nuclear particle collider technology. The Washington Times says that NSF failed to properly monitor Northeastern’s use of the grant, which was supposed to fund research in the US, but instead funded research in Europe. Northeastern reached a settlement with the Department of Justice last week to repay $2.7 million, one third of the grant, because of the failure to comply with the grant’s requirements. US Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said that, “Northeastern failed to adequately safeguard National Science Foundation grant money that had been awarded for the sole purpose of supporting important scientific research.”

Workforce

Missouri University Joins Initiative To Increase Diversity In Engineering.

The Rolla (MO) Daily News  (8/26) reports the Missouri University of Science and Technology College of Engineering and Computing recently joined a group of schools from across the country in a “commitment to provide greater opportunities for women and other underrepresented groups to pursue engineering careers.” The American Society for Engineering Education ranks the university as “19th in the nation for the number of bachelor’s degrees in engineering awarded to African-Americans and 26th in the nation for the number of bachelor’s degrees in engineering awarded to women.”

Industry News

Civil Engineers Use Drones To Monitor Construction Sites.

MIT Technology Review  (8/27) reports that civil engineers are using drones to monitor “workers building a lavish new downtown stadium for the Sacramento Kings in California,” noting that the drones “patrol the Sacramento work site, collecting video footage. That footage is then converted into a three-dimensional picture of the site, which is fed into software that compares it to computerized architectural plans as well as a the construction work plan showing when each element should be finished.”

Engineering and Public Policy

White House Says Keystone Decision Not Imminent.

The Hill  (8/27, Cama) reports that White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said on Thursday that the State Department is still reviewing the Keystone XL pipeline application and has not submitted it to the White House. Earnest made the comments after a report in Canada’s Financial Post suggested that the President would reject the deal over Labor Day weekend.

California Says Cities Have Exceeded Water Conservation Goals.

The AP  (8/28, Smith) reports that the California State Water Resources Control Board announced on Thursday that state cities “cut water use by a combined 31 percent in July, exceeding the governor’s statewide mandate to conserve.” Board chair Felicia Marcus suggested that “the strong water conservation figures show California residents are beginning to understand the dire need to cut back in a fourth year of drought.”

WPost Calls On Congress To Give Railroads Flexibility To Meet Safety Deadline.

In an editorial, the Washington Post  (8/28) says that in 2008, Congress passed a bill “requiring passenger and freight railroads to implement a communications technology called positive train control (PTC), which keeps trains from speed limit violations and collisions,” and set a December 31 deadline “that the Federal Railroad Administration cannot waive.” Congress “alone has the power to delay. If it does not, liability concerns may stop trains from operating.” Congress, the Post says, should revise the law to give railroads more time to comply, “with consequences for those who fail to produce concrete plans for immediate improvement and meet milestones along the way.”

Green Poll Finds Majority Support for Obama Climate Rule For Power Plants.

The Hill  (8/28, Cama) reports that a “survey commissioned” by the League of Conservation Voters “found that 6 in 10 voters support President Obama’s landmark climate rule for power plants.” The poll “also concluded that 70 percent of United States voters want their state governors to comply with the regulation.” Just “31 percent disagreed with the rule, and 17 percent said their states’ governors should not comply.” LCV “characterized the support for the rule as an ‘overwhelming majority.’”

Elementary/Secondary Education

More Schools Introducing Coding Into Elementary School Curriculum.

Education Week  (8/27, Heitin) reports more schools around the country are teaching elementary school students how to code. Avondale Elementary in Arizona began teaching all of its K-8 students computer programming last year. San Francisco plans to introduce computer science as part of its curriculum for all elementary and secondary education students over the new few years. Chicago is also planning to make computer science a core subject in kindergarten.

Catholic School Teachers Attend STREAM Academy For Training.

WBFO-FM  Buffalo, NY (8/27, Buckley) reports more than 150 Catholic school teachers from more than 25 schools in the Diocese of Buffalo attended the STREAM (Science, Technology, Religion, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) Academy at St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute in Kenmore, New York. Teachers received training on how to better teach STREAM subjects to their students.

Tennessee Elementary School Kicks Off New STEM Program.

The Tennessean  (8/27) reports Ashland City Elementary School in Tennessee is offering a new STEM program this school year, which will entail all students participating in a STEM class for 45 minutes per day for six weeks. The program was kicked off by an event hosted by Miss Tennessee Hannah Robison, Professor John Hall of Tennessee State University, and a STEM teacher at the school Kristin McQueen.

Thursday’s Lead Stories

DOE IG Says Solyndra Misrepresented Facts To Secure Federal Loan.
Federal Judge Approves Corinthian Liquidation Plan.
Brown Professor Researching New Material For Solar Panels.
NSF Grant Will Help Train Cybersecurity Professionals.
Environmental Groups May Sue EPA For Not Implementing Fracking Wastewater Rules.
Nevada Governor Appoints New Director Of Science, Innovation And Technology Office.
NSPE Names David D’Amico To Northeast Region Board of Directors.

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Baseball, Apple Pie and Elsevier: Playing “Moneyball” in Librarianship

https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/books/moneyball/whitepaper

or

http://communications.elsevier.com/res/elsevier_uk/Moneyball%20White%20Paper.pdf

Playing “Moneyball” in Librarianship:The Winning Strategy of Gap Analysis

By Tommy Doyle
Senior Vice President, Elsevier

hands

Data, driving high-quality decisions, can be a powerful vehicle for change. By empowering librarians with fact-based analytics, their libraries can become more prominent and valuable. Such “gap analysis” provides librarians greater visibility into usage behavior, as well as their institution’s and the world’s research trends – allowing librarians to provide greater access to the content library patrons want, and elevate their own stature within an institution.

Anyone familiar with the book or movie, Moneyball1 also knows the term, “sabermetrics.”2 When the Oakland A’s started to assemble its Major League Baseball (MLB) team for the 2002 season, it was facing limited revenues and the departure of three marquee players. Billy Beane, the team’s general manager, decided to abandon the time-honored but mostly subjective process of choosing players based on certain statistics used since the 19th century. Beane and his staff adopted an analytical, evidence-based approach to assembling a competitive team. This system empowered them to choose players with great potential who had been overlooked by other teams. They filled the gaps in their line-up based on careful research, not just gut feelings.


beane.jpg


Despite initial criticism from multiple fronts, sabermetrics has been credited with taking the low-budget A’s to the playoffs in both 2002 and 2003 – and several times since then. Beane caught the attention of new Boston Red Sox owner John Henry, who tried to lure him away from the A’s at the end of the 2002 season. While Henry didn’t succeed in signing the Oakland general manager, he embraced Beane’s approach to evaluating and selecting players…and just two years later had created a team that brought a World Series championship to Boston for the first time in 86 years.

Many librarians find themselves in a situation not unlike the one Beane faced in early 2002. The long-accepted ways of acquiring new content are hard to shake, as is the dated perception of librarians as “curators.” They are also coping with small or decreasing budgets that force them to spend less on books and there is heavy scrutiny of all expenditures.

At the same time, researchers and academicians are increasingly requesting access to more content, such as eBooks, that complements primary research. With limited funding, librarians often find it difficult to provide access to all the content patrons – researchers, faculty and students – would like at the level expected in the 21st century. And when librarians do spend money on content, it can be a risky proposition due to a lack of good insight into actual researcher needs.

But if librarians think in a new way – move toward data-driven acquisition like Billy Beane – they just might be able to provide greater access to the foundational and interdisciplinary content patrons want, and elevate their own stature within an institution.

Continue Reading:

https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/books/moneyball/whitepaper

or

http://communications.elsevier.com/res/elsevier_uk/Moneyball%20White%20Paper.pdf

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

American Mathematical Society’s Mathematical Reviews and National Transportation Library join NFAIS
The National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS), a global non-profit membership organisation serving the information community, has announced that the American Mathematical Society’s Mathematical Reviews and the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) National Transportation Library have joined NFAIS as new members. The AMS, long time publisher of Mathematical Reviews and its online companion, MathSciNet®, rejoins NFAIS as a member after being one of the federation’s charter members in 1958.
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Oxford University Press participates in CCC’s new text mining solution
Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a global licensing and content solutions organisation, has announced that academic publisher Oxford University Press (OUP) is participating in its RightFindTM XML for Mining solution. RightFind XML for Mining allows publishers to offer life science companies controlled access to full-text articles in XML format for import into their preferred text mining software.
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ASCO and UICC partner to extend reach of Journal of Global Oncology
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) have announced their partnership to expand the reach of the Journal of Global Oncology (JGO), a new open-access journal that will focus on cancer care, research, and care delivery issues unique to countries and settings with limited healthcare resources. While some journals publish special issues and sections focused on global oncology, JGO will be the first peer-reviewed journal dedicated solely to this area of research.
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Research Solutions, Inc. appoints John Regazzi as Chairman of the Board
Reprints Desk’s parent company Research Solutions, Inc., a pioneer in providing on-demand access to scientific, technical and medical (STM) information for life science companies, academic institutions and other research intensive organisations, has appointed John Regazzi as non-executive chairman of the board. He will succeed President and CEO Peter Derycz, who will remain on the board as a director and continue as president and CEO. Regazzi joined the board as an independent director in June.
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Particle Therapy Cooperative Group to preserve e-journal with Portico
Digital preservation specialist Portico has announced that the Particle Therapy Cooperative Group will preserve ‘International Journal of Particle Therapy’ with Portico, ensuring that it will be secure and available into the future. Particle Therapy Cooperative is a non-profit organisation for those interested in proton, light ion, and heavy charged particle radiotherapy.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

DOE IG Says Solyndra Misrepresented Facts To Secure Federal Loan.

The AP  (8/27, Freking) reports that a four-year investigation by the Energy Department Inspector General has concluded that Solyndra officials “misrepresented facts and omitted key information in their efforts to get a $535 million loan guarantee from the federal government.” The IG report read in part, “In our view, the investigative record suggests that the actions of certain Solyndra officials were, at best, reckless and irresponsible or, at worst, an orchestrated effort to knowingly and intentionally deceive and mislead the department.”

The Washington Times  (8/27, Dinan, Howell) reports that the report said the Administration “may have cut corners in fully vetting the project because of ‘political pressure’ from top Democrats and Solyndra itself.” Bloomberg Politics  (8/26, Snyder) reports DOE spokesman Eben Burnham-Snyder said in a statement that the “findings are ‘consistent with the facts’ already known.”

The Hill  (8/27, Cama) reports that “the deceptions included an overstated 2009 report from the company claiming to have $2.2 billion in firm contracts for solar panel sales.” The Washington Post  (8/27, Leonnig) writes that “behind the scenes, investigators found, Solyndra was struggling with customers who were balking at the high panel prices, arranging secret side deals to pay discounted prices and refusing to buy as many panels as they once promised.”

Higher Education

Federal Judge Approves Corinthian Liquidation Plan.

The Wall Street Journal  (8/27, Gleason, Subscription Publication) reports that US Bankruptcy Court Judge Kevin Carey has approved a plan for Corinthian Colleges Inc. to complete the liquidation of its assets, noting this essentially closes the firm’s bankruptcy proceedings. The article touches on ED’s involvement with the firm’s closure and with efforts to provide relief for former students facing heavy student loan debt.

WPost Voices Support For Administration’s Plan For Prisoner Pell Grants.

In an editorial, the Washington Post  (8/27) urges Congress to get behind the Administration’s “plans for a pilot program to award limited numbers of inmates Pell grants to take college courses behind bars.” The experimental program “will temporarily allow federal grants to be used to cover college costs for certain prisoners” with the emphasis on prisoners “eligible for release within the next five years.” The Post notes that studies show that “prisoner education is cost-effective in reducing recidivism; people released from prison with knowledge and skills have a far better chance of becoming productive members of their communities than those without them.”

Opinion: University Administrators Need To Be Better Financial Planners AsState Funding Decreases.

In a Wall Street Journal  (8/27, Benson, Subscription Publication) opinion piece, University of Colorado president Bruce D. Benson explains how he has cut millions of dollars from the university budget since he took over as president in March 2008. Benson explains that state funding for higher education has dried up, and that university administrators are responsible for making their institutions more financially efficient.

Obituary: Computer Science Education Pioneer Dies At 83.

The New York Times  (8/27, Lohr, Subscription Publication) obituary for Joseph F. Traub tells the story of how Traub, a physicist, became a computer scientist and later an advocate for computer science education in universities across the nation. Traub entered the field of computer science early on during the 1950’s when it was not well respected by other scientists, but Traub helped change that image by establishing some of the strongest computer science departments at universities across the country including those at Carnegie Mellon University and Columbia University.

From ASEE
Deans Pledge Diversity Efforts
Over 130 deans of engineering signed a letter pledging support for diversity initiatives. The letter was presented by University of Southern California Dean Yannis Yortsos at the first-ever White House Demo Day.


NEW edition of eGFI magazine

Over 2 million young people have read eGFI since its inception. A new edition is rolling off the presses, with features on cutting-edge engineering inventions, career choices, and how students can succeed in this rapidly advancing field – all produced with an attractive, engaging layout.

Learn more about a discounted rate on magazines with YOUR ad on the back cover. This is a great product for outreach and community engagement efforts.

Or email marketing@asee.org for more information.

Research and Development

Brown Professor Researching New Material For Solar Panels.

The Providence (RI) Journal  (8/25, Kuffner) reports Professor Nitin Padture of Brown University is researching a new material, perovskites, that could potentially replace silicon in solar panels. Padture is a professor of materials engineering and believes the crystal structures in perovskites could be made cheaply and easily using a process patented by Padture. The material’s flexibility would also expand the range of spaces that solar cells could be installed. WLNE-TV  Providence, RI (8/27) also covers this story.

NSF Grant Will Help Researchers Predict Wildfires In Northwest.

The AP  (8/26) reported the National Science Foundation awarded a $2.8 million grant to researchers at the University of Idaho and Washington State University to study where “severe wildfires are likely to occur in the Northwest.” Researchers will use models to predict “where fires will burn the hottest and cause the most destruction.”

Experts Say Planetary Protection Must Be Strong On Mars 2020 Mission.

SPACE  (8/26, Redd) reports that during the Astrobiology Science Conference back in June, advocates, such as Penelope Boston, co-founder of the National Cave and Karst Research Institute, called for new ways to ensure spacecraft do not bring Earth microbes to Mars, “including more planetary protection-compatible materials and electronics.” John Rummel of East Carolina University NASA’s former planetary protection officer, who serves with Boston on NASA’s Planetary Protection Subcommittee, also thought that spacecraft designers could do more thermal testing than they are currently comfortable with because the oil industry shows that sensitive equipment can perform at high temperatures. According to the article, both agreed that planetary project needs to be “a big priority for the people planning NASA’s sample-collecting Mars 2020 rover and other future missions.”

New Research Uses Quantum Dots To Turn Windows In Photovoltaic Panels.

John Timmer, in a piece for Ars Technica  (8/27), says that quantum dots may hold the key to turning windows into photovoltaic energy sources, according to new research. The new hardware “is filled with a diffuse cloud of quantum dots that absorb almost all of the solar spectrum.”

Workforce

NSF Grant Will Help Train Cybersecurity Professionals.

The Hill  (8/27, Williams) reports the “National Science Foundation has awarded New York’s Pace University a $2.5 million grant to train young cybersecurity professionals.” The grant will support several students each year in order to address the “dearth of qualified cybersecurity professionals across both the private and the public sectors.”

Analysis: Veterans May Help Solve Manufacturing Skills Gap.

The Strategic Sourceror  (8/27) notes that while the manufacturing industry has “been targeting school-aged young adults” to fill the skills gap that the Manufacturing Institute has reported will result in 2 million unfilled manufacturing positions, companies may want to consider veterans who “are already trained in the science, technology, engineering and mathematical fields.” The piece highlights the STEM-related training the military men and women receive during their service and the benefits that both the companies and the veterans receive through employment.

Engineering and Public Policy

Environmental Groups May Sue EPA For Not Implementing Fracking Wastewater Rules.

The Huffington Post  (8/26, Sheppard) reports that a group of environmental organizations including the Environmental Integrity Project and the Natural Resources Defense Council is threatening to sue to EPA “for not implementing new regulations on the disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations.”

Wisconsin Counties Would Violate Proposed Ground-Level Ozone Rules. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel  (8/27, Bergquist, Content) reports the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “is expected to soon unveil new rules that would require reductions of ground-level ozone.” The Sentinel says the impact on southern Wisconsin is that “many counties currently in compliance” with the present standard “would likely violate a more stringent” requirement. Wisconsin became the third state, according to the Sentinel, where the National Association of Manufacturers is running ads that say the new law would “stifle the economy and kill millions of jobs.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Nevada Governor Appoints New Director Of Science, Innovation And Technology Office.

The AP  (8/27) reports the Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval has appointed Brian Mitchell to be the new director of the Governor’s Office of Science, Innovation and Technology. The new director will help K-12 schools and colleges improve STEM education so that Nevada students will be prepared for the high-tech economy.

Oklahoma Launches New Online Career Development Education System.

The Tulsa (OK) World  (8/27) reports Oklahoma has launched the “OK Career Guide, a new statewide career development education system.” The online tool “offers users new ways to explore careers, pathways and educational opportunities.”

Elementary School Teacher Excited To Pass On Space Camp STEM Lessons.

Delaware Public Media  (8/26, Hoffman) reports that Jenny Rovner of Wilson Elementary School will pass on to her students the “cutting edge STEM techniques” she learned at an educational camp at the US Space and Rocket Center this summer. Rovner reportedly “can’t wait” for the chance to show off the new lessons.

Also in the News

NSPE Names David D’Amico To Northeast Region Board of Directors.

The Lincoln (RI) Valley Breeze  (8/25) reports that the National Society of Professional Engineers has named David D’Amico, a “professional engineer and principal with the firm of D’Amico Engineering Technology Inc. in North Providence,” to a two-year term as the group’s “board of directors representing the Northeast Region.” The article details D’Amico’s accomplishments in Rhode Island where he is “recognized across the state for his prominence in his field.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

Uber Announces Partnership With University Of Arizona For Driverless Car Research.
Many High School Students Supplementing Studies With MOOCs.
Raytheon Receives $65.1 Million For Navy’s Over-The-Horizon Radar.
Smith Criticizes EPA For Missing Deadline On Turning Over Gold King Mine Spill Documents.
New York School Sponsored By IBM Aims To Help Minority Students Start Technology Careers.

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