Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier announces winners of 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize
STM publisher Elsevier has announced the three winners of the 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize at its annual Symposium held in conjunction with the New Scientist Live festival in London. Celebrating top research by leading young chemists across the globe, the Reaxys PhD Prize recognizes innovative and original research in chemistry, with an emphasis on synthesis.
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Future Science Group launches International Journal of Pharmacokinetics
Future Science Group (FSG) has announced the launch of the International Journal of Pharmacokinetics, a new peer-reviewed online and print publication dedicated to addressing all aspects of pharmacokinetic research. The journal is the latest addition to the internationally recognized Future Science portfolio and is supported by a multidisciplinary, international editorial board comprising leading researchers and opinion leaders from academia and industry.
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Wolters Kluwer celebrates 10 years in India
Wolters Kluwer, a global leader in information services and solutions, is celebrating its 10th anniversary in India where it has been supporting healthcare and accounting professionals with technology-enabled information tools and software solutions. The milestone was marked with a ceremony attended by the Ambassador of The Netherlands to India, Alphonsus Stoelinga.
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Ex Libris releases Rosetta version 5.1
Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced the release of version 5.1 of the Rosetta digital management and preservation system. The new version was created in collaboration with the Rosetta User Group and reflects the needs and priorities of the growing Rosetta customer community.
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Call for applications to the IFLA Journal Editorial Committee
The IFLA Professional Committee is calling for up to two members to join the IFLA Journal Editorial Committee, for a term of four years (renewable once) from 2016-2020. The IFLA Journal Editorial Committee is appointed by and reports to the Professional Committee. It manages the editorial direction of the IFLA Journal and ensures its quality, actively participating in the review process.
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Ingram Content Group announces three new associates to the company
Ingram Content Group Inc., a subsidiary of Nashville-based Ingram Industries Inc., has announced three new associates to the company. Kurt Hettler has joined Ingram Academic Services as Director of Academic Services; Peter Antone joins Ingram as the Director of Marketing, Publisher Services; and Rachel Bressler is a new Director of Client Relations for Perseus Distribution.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Clean Power Plan Faces Constitutional Challenges In Court.

In coverage in advance of oral arguments over the Clean Power Plan before the DC Court of Appeals, Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) reports that “Industry lawyers will start out in the morning, followed by former Obama mentor Laurence Tribe of Harvard Law School and David Rivkin of Baker Hostetler, who will present the core constitutional argument” centered on accountability.ClimateWire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Holden, Subscription Publication) reports that the outcome of the Clean Power Plan oral arguments “will determine whether the United States can make good on the promises it made as part of the global accord.”

Legal Challenge To Clean Power Plan Unlikely To Be Resolved Before Obama Leaves Office. The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Dennis, Marimow) examines the legal challenge to the Clean Power Plan being heard by an appeals court in Washington DC this week. The Post claims that the legality of the rule is “almost certain to remain unresolved when Obama leaves office,” but that the “outcome of the case ultimately could shape the president’s environmental legacy and influence how millions of Americans get their electricity.” Ann Carlson, an environmental law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, noted that “What the court has to say about [the] EPA’s authority … will be important for future administrations. It will have consequences.”

Ex-EPA Head Whitman Wants Court To OK Clean Power Plan. Former EPA Administrator Christine Todd Whitman writes for TIME Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) that Clean Air Act “has proved to be a powerful tool for reducing dangerous air pollution and protecting public health” while “driving innovation and without hampering economic growth.” As the DC Circuit Court of Appeals prepares to hear arguments in a case challenging the CPP, Whitman writes that the “EPA’s authority to move forward with regulating carbon pollution under the Clean Air Act is not a matter of debate.” The Clean Power Plan offers states “extraordinary flexibility in how they comply with their obligations” and “was not proposed in a vacuum,” given that “huge market-driven shifts in the power sector toward cleaner sources of generation were underway well before” the plan.

Higher Education

NSF Gives South Dakota Mines Grant To Help Women In Engineering Courses.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) reports that the National Science Foundation and the John T. Vucurevich Foundation for its Culture and Attitude Program has given the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology a $1.1 million grant for “a program that aims to attract, retain and graduate more women and other underrepresented students in engineering.”

NSF Gives Texas Colleges Grant To Develop Drone Curriculum.

The Corpus Christi (TX) Caller-Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Garcia) reports that the National Science Foundation has given Texas’ Del Mar College and Texas A&M-Corpus Christi a $788,000 advanced technological education grant to support “Del Mar’s continuing development programs involving unmanned aircraft systems. The three-year grant will run until June 2019 and will allow Del Mar’s geographical information systems students to continue degree plans and purse a bachelor in GIS or digital information mapping at A&M-Corpus Christi.”

Ohio State Engineering Students Work On Electric Car Land Speed Record.

Ars Technica Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports that the electric vehicle company Venturi and Ohio State University have collaborated on a car called the Venturi Buckeye Bullet-3, which has set a new land speed record for electric vehicles of 341MPH at the Bonneville Salt Flats.Popular Mechanics Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports that former OSU graduate student and team leader David Cooke said the car consists of “two motors sharing a cooling system and a common shaft.” CBS News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) publishes a brief video segment on its website.

APLU Launching Public Relations Campaign.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) reports the Association of Public Land Universities is launching a PR campaign aimed at countering “public outrage over rising tuition and congressional scrutiny over the use of endowments,” among other negative perceptions about public universities. The organization maintains that “public universities are still the cheapest way to earn a four-year degree” despite state funding cuts. The campaign “will focus on affordability.”

Companies Turn To German Apprenticeship Program To Fill Skills Gap.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Schulze, Subscription Publication) reports companies operating in the US are looking to Germany’s apprenticeship approach to vocational training in order to fill America’s skills gap. Americans view a four-year college degree a more viable path to high-paying jobs than a two-year degree, so the apprenticeship program is a seemingly better alternative that allows participants on-the-job training, a recognized certificate in their field, and a chance to stay on with the company they worked for.

Scientific American Editorial Argues Against Favoring STEM Over Humanities.

An editorial in Scientific American Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) takes issue with political leaders who are “trying to nudge higher education toward course work that promotes future job prospects,” saying that it is “deeply misguided” to promote STEM courses “to the exclusion of the humanities.” Both areas of study, the editors write, are vital “for the U.S. economy to continue as the preeminent leader in technological innovation.”

From ASEE
Liberal Arts and Engineering Education
The Teagle Foundation’s Liberal Arts and the Professions initiative embeds the liberal arts in undergraduate engineering education by forging curricular links between faculty in the disciplines and professional fields. The result is students more fully appreciate the social, cultural, and ethical dimensions of their work. To be considered for a grant, read the application guidelines and submit a 3-5 page concept paper to proposals@teagle.org. Contact Loni Bordoloi Pazich at bordoloi@teagle.org for more information.

Maker Summit
The ASU Citizen Science Maker Summit 2016  is a two-day event (Oct 27-28), hosted by Arizona State University in partnership with SciStarter, exploring the crossroads of citizen science and the Maker movement. Registration now open with discounts before Oct 1. Read ASEE’s Maker Report.

Profiles Survey Now Open
The annual Profiles of Engineering and Engineering Technology Schools survey is open. Make sure your institution is included in this important report.

Research and Development

Commentary: Fighting Cybercrime Hinges On Educating Public, Funding Technology.

In commentary for the Huffington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/24) , New York Institute of Technology President Edward Guiliano writes about the challenges of fighting cybercrime and the resulting need for cybersecurity professionals, citing Cisco figures estimating a dearth of some one million such workers worldwide. He says that the public must be educated about the realities of cybercrime and the need to “encourage those who can to fund the technology needed to thwart cybercrime.”

NSF Giving Cornell University $23 Million For “Center For Bright Beams.”

WENY-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Elmira, NY (9/26) reports that the National Science Foundation is giving Cornell University $23 million to “establish a new Science and Technology Center called the Center for Bright Beams.” The center’s goal is “to contribute to scientific advances in chemistry and biology by enhancing accelerator capabilities” and to “develop tools to predict, design and test the impact on cellular function of changes to their internal organization.”

Science And Technology Center for Engineering MechanoBiology To Study Single Cells.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Jost) reports, “A joint effort between Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania received a $23.6 million federal grant” to create the Science and Technology Center for Engineering MechanoBiology, “an effort to understand how single cells work.” The center will study “what they react to and how they can be used or developed to prevent diseases, boost crop practices and more.”

US Army Research Laboratory, UK Defense Ministry Partner On Information Science.

ExecutiveGov Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Clemens) reports the US Army Research Laboratory and the UK Defence Ministry have partnered regarding “distributed analytics and information science” to bolster “situational awareness during military coalition operations.” Partners in the alliance include companies such as “IBM, BAE Systems, Raytheon’s BBN Technologies subsidiary,” and Airbus.

Industry News

Opinion: Tesla Vulnerability Shows That Cybersecurity Must Be Part Of Vehicle Design.

In an op-ed for The ComputerWorld (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26), Adrian Davis, managing director with nonprofit Internet security educational organization (ISC)2, argues that the recent demonstration of vulnerabilities with Tesla vehicles that show it could be “hacked from 12 miles away” illustrates that the “explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security.” Davis says that cybersecurity must be part of the “concept, design, engineering, and production” of new vehicles. Davis concludes that what is needed is a “culture of ‘security by design’ among all designers, engineers and manufacturers of products that connect to the internet.”

Android Fans Replace Phones Faster Than iPhone Users.

A new study cited by USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Newman) reports that Android users are faster to replace their smartphone devices than iPhone owners. Part of the reason for that, according to the Consumer Intelligence Research Partners sponsored report, is that Apple is slower to upgrade technological advances, along with the brand’s higher price point.

Engineering and Public Policy

House Waterways Bill Faces More Opposition.

In continuing coverage, The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Zanona) reports Democrats are opposing another part of the House waterways bill “because a portion of the $810 million in authorized funding would go toward splash parks, baseball fields and covered basketball courts.” Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), ranking member on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, “is blasting” a Texas project “tucked into the underlying legislation,” and is “urging the House Rules Committee to include an amendment that would prohibit the Army Corps of Engineers budget from being used on sports fields and splash parks.”

Commentary: 3D Printing Could “Revolutionize” Transportation Infrastructure Construction.

In a TechCrunch Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Harrington) “Crunch Network” piece, Parsons chairman and CEO Charles “Chuck” Harrington writes that 3D printing technology can “revolutionize the transportation infrastructure industry” especially because “bridges require much longer parts to construct than, say, a car or plane.” Harrington acknowledges that “much more research and development must be completed before we can realistically expect to ‘print’ any bridges with additive manufacturing.” Yet, he explains that if engineers successfully identify an instantly-curing concrete with the strength and stiffness required for bridge construction, then “additive manufacturing would improve precision and quality control while reducing waste, costs and congestion during infrastructure construction projects.”

House Committee To Hold Hearing On Commercial Drone Regulations.

In its rundown on regulations, The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Wheeler) says that the House Small Business Committee plans to hold a hearing “on the Federal Aviation Administration’s regulatory framework for commercial drone operation” on Tuesday.

Ex-EPA Chief Perciasepe Says Natural Gas, Renewable Trends Will Endure Beyond Election.

Bloomberg BNA Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Scott) reports former acting head of the EPA Bob Perciasepe said Friday at the Society of Environmental Journalists conference that broad regulatory and investment trends favoring natural gas and renewable energy and are driving down US carbon emissions are likely to endure regardless of who wins the presidential election. Congress has locked in production and investment tax credits for renewable energy for four or six more years, “and that’s not going to go way unless Congress overturns itself” by rolling back the incentives it put in place in a December 2015 funding extension, said Perciasepe, now president of the Center for Climate & Energy Solutions.

Kansas City Receives Top Recognition For Easing Solar Installation Process.

The Kansas City (MO) Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) reports Kansas City is among 14 cities across the US, “along with Gladstone and Columbia in Missouri, to be given top recognition for making it faster, easier and cheaper to do solar energy installations.” The SolSmart program, which is funded by the Energy Department, “recognized cities Monday across the country that are ‘open for solar business,’ reducing soft costs and helping to attract solar industry investment.”

Indiana School District Switches Buildings To Solar Power.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) reports Sheridan Community Schools in central India “said it expects to save millions of dollars over the next 20 years by getting all of its electricity from solar power.” The school district “now has an array of about 5,900 solar panels between its elementary, middle and high school buildings.” Superintendent Dave Mundy believes “the move will allow the district to have more control over its utility costs.” Mundy stated, “It’s something any school should look into. … Balancing a budget and trying to (estimate) the utilities cost is the hardest thing to do in school finance.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Virginia State University Algebra Program To Promote STEM Among Minority Students.

Diverse Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26) reports that Virginia State University is using a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to promote “the Algebra Project, a unique approach to teaching mathematics that was developed by civil rights activist Bob Moses.” The initiative “will work with school districts in Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia, as well as New Orleans and Philadelphia to increase the number of underrepresented minority students entering college with the skills to be able to pursue a STEM major and career.”

Non-Traditional School Showing That All Students Can Succeed At Science And Technology.

U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/26, Lucadamo) reports that according to George Washington University science education professor Sharon Lynch, “preliminary research on inclusive science and technology high schools is promising.” Lynch has “participated in two studies, one comparing typical inclusive science schools to traditional high schools and another looking at exemplary inclusive science schools.” Results of the most resent studies “39 inclusive science and technology schools and 22 traditional high schools in North Carolina and Texas” presented in June to the American Educational Research Association shows that 60 percent of North Carolina high school seniors “seniors at the science schools had taken calculus or precalculus on average, compared to 38 percent at traditional high schools. In Texas, the difference was smaller but still higher at science schools.” Lynch said, “The trends are all in the right direction.”

Monday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Digital Science and ÜberResearch to sponsor ORCID’s next Outreach Meeting: Research Without Borders
Digital Science and ÜberResearch will be sponsoring ORCID’s next Outreach Meeting. The theme of the meeting is, ‘Research Without Borders.’ The event is scheduled for October 5, 2016, at the headquarters of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1200 New York Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20005, United States. Registration is free, but places are limited.
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Emerald appoints Ernst Kallus as new Technology & Programme Director
Emerald Group Publishing has announced the appointment of Ernst Kallus as its Technology & Programme Director. Kallus was formerly Digital Media Director at Oxford University Press and, most recently, Director of Platform Strategy at Pearson. Ernst will commence his role with Emerald on September 26, 2016.
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Rockefeller University Press revives journal websites
The Rockefeller University Press (RUP) has shared the new look of The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and The Journal of General Physiology (JGP) with the Society for Scholarly Publishing community. With greater emphasis on enhancing readability on all devices, the new design features a two-column layout that allows for more white space and larger text that is responsive to fit desktop, laptop, tablet, and smartphone browser windows.
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Russian medical publisher Media Sphera partners with Publons to recognise reviewers
Media Sphera, the leading Russian publisher of peer-reviewed medical journals, has partnered with Publons to help reviewers track, verify and showcase their peer review efforts. In a true show of innovation, Media Sphera has also developed an open-source plugin so other journals, using the Open Journal System (OJS) editorial management system, can easily integrate with Publons to give reviewers the credit they deserve.
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MSU scientist Hikmet Budak to serve on editorial board of open-access scientific journal – Scientific Reports
Hikmet Budak, Montana State University’s first Montana Plant Sciences Endowed Chair, has been invited to serve on the editorial board of Scientific Reports, an online open-access journal from the publishers of Nature. A leading geneticist and genomicist, Budak’s editorial duties will be in Scientific Reports’ Genetics and Genomics section, where he will manage the peer review process.
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Hindawi and Editage partner to provide English language editing services
Hindawi and Editage have announced a new partnership that will provide English-language editing to authors wishing to submit to Hindawi publications. This partnership will result in Editage’s services being integrated into Hindawi’s submission process and provide a 10% discount to Hindawi authors. According to Craig Raybould, Chief Process Engineer of Hindawi, these pre-submission manuscript preparation services will help authors, particularly those for whom English is not their first language.
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Latest edition of Blogspeak now online
The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: Duncan Green (How academics and NGOs can work together to influence policy: insights from the InterAction report); Holly Else (Journal tries ‘results-free’ peer review); Jennifer Byrne (Reviewing the review); Ashley Snelgrove (How and Why to Get Hooked on Library Podcasts); Tom Culley (Guest Post: Publons’ Tom Culley – Are We Doing Enough for Editors?); Angela Cochran (Is More Recognition the Key to Peer Review Success?);and Elizabeth Gadd and Denise Troll Covey (What it means to be Green: exploring publishers’ changing approaches to Green open access). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Administration Invites Tribes To Consultations About Infrastructure Projects.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23) reports representatives of “567 federally recognized tribes” have been invited by the Administration to “a series of consultations aimed at getting input on infrastructure projects.” The consultations were called in response to the “Standing Rock Sioux’s fight over the Dakota Access oil pipeline.”

Tribes To Ask Obama To Stop Dakota Access. McClatchy Share to FacebookShare to Twitter(9/23, Hotakainen) reports a number of tribes are asking President Obama to help them stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. They argue the pipeline “would jeopardize sacred sites and burial grounds of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.” On Monday, President Obama will host the White House Tribal Nations Conference, and Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman David Archambault II will offer “an update” at an advance meeting on Sunday.

Canadian Tribes Pledge Support To Opponents Of Dakota Access. Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Nickel) reports Canadian native groups are also joining the opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs said, “I can tell you with great certainty that in the event there’s an escalation of aggression on the part of the state or (U.S.) federal government, there will certainly be a response on the Canadian side from indigenous peoples.”

Dakota Access Has Purchased Land Along Route. Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Scheyder) reports Dakota Access LLC has purchased over 6,000 acres along the pipeline’s route in North Dakota. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe says the land has burial grounds of importance to the tribe that could be destroyed by the pipeline construction.

Sunoco Has Record Of Pipeline Leaks. Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Hampton) reports in a separate story that Sunoco Logistics which would operate the pipeline has had more leaks than other firms with 200 since 2010. Reuters points out that that record of leaks has not been part of the argument over the pipeline. A Sunoco spokesman said that the company has been working to improve that record with some success since 2012.

Higher Education

Schools Scrambling To Find New Accreditor After ED Severs Ties With ACICS.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Belkin, Subscription Publication) reports on ED’s decision last week to withdraw recognition from the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, which oversaw around hundreds of for-profit colleges, saying the move is leaving those schools scrambling to find a new accreditor so they can continue to have access to Federal student aid. Rival accreditor the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges Executive Director Michale S. McComis says some 200 former ACICA schools have reached out to begin working with his group.

Inside Higher Ed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23) reports barring a reversal from Education Secretary John King, ACICS will “no longer be a gatekeeper to federal aid for 245 member colleges, which collectively enroll 600,000 students.” The piece explains that “after the outcome of an appeal…member colleges would have 18 months to find a new accreditor.” The Kansas City (MO) Star Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23),Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25), and WHNT-TV Share to FacebookShare to Twitter Huntsville, AL (9/23) also cover this story.

Robot Breaks Ground For Montana State University College Of Engineering.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25) reports that “a prototype of a lunar mining robot built by Montana State University engineering and computer science students” has “dug up symbolic scoops of sand” for the groundbreaking of the school’s new College of Engineering. The new building is expected to be complete in 2018.

Alum Gives University Of Kansas $2 Million For Chemical, Petroleum Engineering Faculty Development.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/24) reports that John V. Bossi, who earned a chemical engineering degree from the University of Kansas in 1948, has given the school “a gift of more than $2 million for faculty development in the university’s department of chemical and petroleum engineering.”

Tulane Creates New Certificate Programs In Engineering.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/24) reported that Tulane University, in a news release, announced an expansion to its engineering program, and has included “certificate programs in electrical, mechanical and computational engineering.” The program, which is available to engineering physics majors, allows students to “to choose one of the four concentrations so they can graduate with both a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics and a certificate in their specialty area.”

For-Profit Sector “Decimated” Under Obama.

BuzzFeed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Hensley-Clancy) reports that at the beginning of the Obama Administration, the “seven largest publicly traded college operators were worth a combined $51 billion, with more than 815,000 students.” Now, “the industry has been decimated,” worth only $6 billion and with two of its largest players in bankruptcy. Moreover, “the most valuable company in the sector has spent the last two years desperately trying to become a non-profit.” The piece cites an “improving economy that made trade schools less lucrative” and a “withering war on for-profit schools by federal and state authorities” as the reasons for the industry’s collapse. The “administration’s more aggressive approach” has drawn criticism from the for-profit sector and critics of “federal overreach.”

Northern Michigan U Awarded Grant To Increase Number Of Native Women In STEM.

The Indian Country Today Media Network Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25) reports that the National Science Foundation has awarded Northern Michigan University nearly $300,000 to launch a two-year pilot project intended to increase the number of American Indian and Alaska Native female college graduates, especially in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The project is also intended to address the “lack of American Indian teaching methods within the sciences education curricula.” The grant will provide: training for STEM educators on inclusive methods and materials; college preparation opportunities utilize inclusive STEM practices; and educational mentors for AI/AN female students moving from high school to college. “By introducing American Indian methods and materials to K-16 STEM educators, we will be inviting them to teach beyond the conventional academic box,” said April Lindala, director of NMU’s Center for Native American Studies.

From ASEE
Liberal Arts and Engineering Education
The Teagle Foundation’s Liberal Arts and the Professions initiative embeds the liberal arts in undergraduate engineering education by forging curricular links between faculty in the disciplines and professional fields. The result is students more fully appreciate the social, cultural, and ethical dimensions of their work. To be considered for a grant, read the application guidelines and submit a 3-5 page concept paper to proposals@teagle.org. Contact Loni Bordoloi Pazich at bordoloi@teagle.org for more information.

Maker Summit
The ASU Citizen Science Maker Summit 2016  is a two-day event (Oct 27-28), hosted by Arizona State University in partnership with SciStarter, exploring the crossroads of citizen science and the Maker movement. Registration now open with discounts before Oct 1. Read ASEE’s Maker Report.

Profiles Survey Now Open
The annual Profiles of Engineering and Engineering Technology Schools survey is open. Make sure your institution is included in this important report.

Research and Development

NASA Researchers Find Evidence Of Possible Subsurface Ocean On Pluto.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Khan) reports NASA has published research in the journal Geophysical Research Letters that provides evidence of a possible 560-mile-wide ocean beneath the surface of the dwarf planet Pluto. According to NASA researchers, the gravitational bond between Pluto and its moon Charon appears to treat the site, called Sputnik Planum, as if it has “extra mass” rather than less, as it might if the site were a crater. A sea of liquid salt water “could account for that extra mass in Sputnik Planum.”

Research Casts Dark Matter Theory Into Doubt.

Brian K. Oberlein wrote on the Forbes Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23) website that new research on galactic rotation curves “could mean that dark matter is wrong after all.” Researchers “looked at the observed rotation curves for 153 galaxies, and calculated the radial acceleration at various distances in each galaxy. They then compared these results to the gravitational acceleration as predicted by the distribution of visible matter within a galaxy,” and “found a strong correlation between the two.” Among other possibilities, this could mean that “some new kind of dark matter physics” is needed.

House Democrats Propose Bill To Address Sexual Harassment In Research Fields.

Politico Morning Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25) reports that a group of House Democrats headed by Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA) have proposed legislation to address “pervasive” sexual harassment in scientific research fields “driving women out of” STEM fields. The legislation would require colleges “to disclose any ‘substantiated’ findings of sexual abuse by a professor to all federal agencies that have awarded research grants to that school within the last 10 years.”

Industry News

UPS, CyPhy Test Delivery Of Emergency Medical Supplies By Autonomous Drone.

There is much media interest in the launch of UPS’ drone tests in Massachusetts with the mock delivery of medical supplies to Children’s Island off the coast. Coverage focuses on statements about the successful delivery from UPS and its partner in the tests CyPhy, as well as new developments in Federal drone regulations. The autonomous test was conducted off of CyPhy’s Persistent Aerial Reconnaissance and Communications vehicle system.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Weise) reports online the “series of tests” being conducted by UPS and CyPhy seek to prove that “unmanned aerial vehicles can safely be used for deliveries in the United States” and will help FAA “as it seeks to find ways to safely integrate drones into America’s airspace, in this case showing that drones can be trusted to fly farther than the pilot can see.” USA Today observes that UPS has also been conducting UAS testing in warehouses and “is also exploring the use of drones to deliver humanitarian aid in hard-to-reach parts of the world and has done tests in Rwanda.” USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23) also posted a video report online.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23) reports that CyPhy is using test data “to gather engineering and cost information and then work with UPS to look at where drones can add the most value to UPS’ extensive network.” The AP also mentions Wal-Mart and Amazon’s UAS testing in warehouses and for home delivery. The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Stevens, Wells, Subscription Publication) reports that while Amazon and Alphabet have eagerly pursued drone delivery tests, shipping companies remain ambivalent about the benefits of UAS delivery. The story quotes FedEx CEO Fred Smith on Amazon’s announcement in 2013 that it would start drone testing “There are two enormous transportation networks that are built around moving light packages and freight, and they are FedEx and UPS.”

The Boston Globe Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Ngowi) reports that Greiner herself believes “Drones aren’t going to take the place of all delivery, but there are places where you have inaccessible location, an emergency situation where the infrastructure is down, you want or need the package quickly — these are the areas where drones will be the best way to get a package to a location.”

Engineering and Public Policy

US Court Of Appeals For DC To Hear Challenge To Clean Power Plan Tuesday.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23, Dlouhy) reports on the lawsuit over President Obama’s Clean Power Plan, saying that it has been beneficial to lawyers and pointing out that there will be 16 lawyers addressing the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Tuesday, and 70 “appellate briefs, appendices, supplements, and, yes, corrections” have already been submitted. The plan’s survival is seen as important, but not absolutely necessary to the US reaching its emissions reductions goals. Opponents argue that it would give the EPA too much authority over power production and transmission.

WPost: Regulators Must Be “Reasonable” About Autonomous Vehicle Manufacturing.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/23) editorializes it is “crucial” for the Transportation Department to insist on autonomous vehicle safety “without strangling the very innovation that will make that happen.” The paper praises the Administration’s approach so far, saying it lays out “areas of concern” and press carmakers to produce safe, sound technologies without “mandating” too many specifics.

DOE Move Aims To Accelerate Permitting Of Power Lines On Federal Lands.

The “Morning Energy” blog of Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25, Crowley) reported the Energy Department on Thursday released a final rule “aimed at accelerating permitting for interstate power lines on federal lands.” The rule “comes as part of the Obama administration’s efforts to speed up federal reviews for large transmission projects that will be needed to accommodate coal plant retirements and new renewable generation.” It will provide developers with the option of a “simplified integrated interagency permitting process,” in which the department “and the developer would meet with other agencies and outside interest groups to identify issues that could trip up projects before the developer files an application.”

Nations Near Agreement On Jet Emissions Proposal.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25, Fountain, Subscription Publication) reports that government officials from around the world will gather in Montreal this week “for final negotiations on a deal to cap greenhouse gas emissions from international jet flights.” The accord on aircraft emissions is seen as building on the momentum of the Paris agreement on climate change. And at least 55 countries, including the US, China, and most of Europe, have announced support for an aviation agreement. “If all of them participate, it would be a major step in reducing the environmental impact of international air travel, an often-overlooked contributor to climate change, largely through the purchase of credits to offset emissions,” the Times says.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/25, Wall, Subscription Publication) also covers this story.

Elementary/Secondary Education

Wyoming Board Of Education Approves New Science Standards.

The Sheridan (WY) Press Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/24, Dunn) reported that on Friday, Wyoming’s State Board of Education adopted the 2016 Wyoming State Standards, to be implemented no later than the beginning of the 2020-21 academic year. The new standards were created by 41 individuals on the Wyoming Science Standard Review Committee. The most notable change is in the approach to teaching science, which will now “have a three-dimensional focus” that includes “cross-cutting concepts, disciplinary core ideas and science and engineering practices.” Wyoming standards supervisor Laurie Hernandez said, “Instead of just teaching science concepts, the approach is to have students just be scientists. … We don’t want them to just regurgitate facts but instead they want them to inquire, to ask questions, to research and develop their own investigations to come to their own conclusions.”

Friday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Springer’s online platform SpringerLink celebrates its 20th anniversary with 10 million documents
Now in its 20th year, SpringerLink, the comprehensive online delivery platform created by global publisherSpringer, has reached a total of 10 million documents. Founded in 1996, SpringerLink paved the way for the publisher’s transition from traditional print media to electronic publishing. SpringerLink was one of the first online information services dedicated to scientific research.
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EBSCO and Stacks Inc. release Stacks, a user-focused web platform that creates the best library experience possible
Libraries can now change the look and feel of their websites instantly with the release of Stacks, a hosted, turnkey web content management system designed specifically for libraries. With Stacks customisable themes, configurable drag-and-drop layouts, social media integrations, granular user roles and multi-language support for more than 60 languages, libraries are now able to create online content with ease.
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IOP Publishing announces reviewer survey in a bid to help understand communities’ needs
As part of Peer Review Week, IOP Publishing is launching a reviewer survey to better understand the experience of refereeing an article and to provide an evidential basis for the further development of their referee services. The survey has been designed to obtain objective and truly candid feedback from researchers who have first-hand experience of refereeing for their journals.
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CCC’s Text Mining Solution now available to startups, and small and medium-sized enterprises
Global licensing and content solutions provider Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC) has announced that its text mining solution, RightFindTM XML for Mining, is available to startups, and small and medium-sized enterprises. RightFind XML for Mining allows publishers to offer life science companies access to full-text articles in native XML format for import into their preferred text mining software, such as Linguamatics I2E.
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Frontline Medical Communications announces December 2016 launch of Hematology News in print
Frontline Medical Communications (FMC) has announced the launch of Hematology News in print, debuting December 2016 and publishing monthly in 2017. In conjunction with the website, Hematology News (in print) will provide indispensable coverage of important clinical research from medical meetings and journals, with timely, expert analysis and commentaries that put these advances into perspective.
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NISO releases recommended practice on altmetrics
The National Information Standards Organization has published NISO RP-25-2016, Outputs of the NISO Alternative Assessment Project. This recommended practice on altmetrics, an expansion of the tools available for measuring the scholarly impact of research in the knowledge environment, was developed by working groups that were part of NISO’s Altmetrics Initiative, a project funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.
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Pearson and Jisc announce e-book pilot
Learning company Pearson and Jisc have announced a year-long pilot that will make e-books more readily accessible to students across UK higher education (HE). The agreement is based on extensive engagement and feedback from members of Jisc, and follows six months of open and constructive dialogue between Jisc and Pearson.
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ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

ED Moves To Sever Ties With ACICS.

Several major media outlets are covering ED’s decision to shut down the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Cohen, Subscription Publication) reports that ACICS is “the nation’s largest accreditor of for-profit colleges,” and “had stood watch as failing institutions like Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical Institute teetered on a pileup of fraud investigations.” In a letter to the agency, ED cited 21 areas in which it is out of compliance with Federal regulations and expressed doubt that the accreditor has the capacity to correct these issues. ACICS says it plans to appeal the decision.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Douglas-Gabriel) says ED’s decision upholds an independent advisory board’s earlier vote to bar the agency “from serving as the gatekeeper between colleges and billions of dollars in federal financial aid, setting the stage for a protracted fight.” ED’s Emma Vadehra wrote in her letter that ED doubts the accreditor’s “ability to rectify years of lax oversight of troubled for-profit colleges.” The Post explains that ACICS has faced criticism from “lawmakers, state attorneys general and advocacy groups” who say it let “schools under investigation for fraud or with rock-bottom graduation rates receive millions of dollars in federal loans and grants, putting students and taxpayers at risk.” Critics of the agency say its recent reforms and leadership shakeups are “too little, too late.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Kerr) reports that on Thursday ED “withdrew recognition” of ACICS, which in turn released a statement saying it would appeal directly to Education Secretary John King. The AP says that the move “could force schools to close and threaten financial aid to hundreds of thousands of students.” The AP says that Vadehra’s decision “followed staff and advisory panel recommendations to sever ties with the council.” The piece explains that “hundreds of schools would be forced to find a new accreditor within 18 months” in order to have continued access to Federal student aid.

Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Stratford) characterizes ED’s action as “rare,” saying it “amounts to what is effectively a death penalty” for the accreditor, whose “seal of approval had allowed billions of dollars in taxpayer-funded Pell Grants and federal loans to flow to the now-defunct Corinthian Colleges” and ITT Educational Services schools. The piece reports Democratic praise and Republican scorn for the move on Capitol Hill.

Other media outlets covering this story include BuzzFeed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22), the Charleston (WV) Gazette-Mail Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22), U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22), and the Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22).

Senate Democrats Look To Give ED More Power Over Accreditors. U.S. News & World Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) reports that Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and other Senate Democrats have introduced a bill aimed at “beef[ing] up the federal role in the college accreditation process as a check on accrediting agencies that continue allowing for-profits schools to receive federal student aid amid reports of fraud.” The bill would give ED “new tools to more effectively hold accrediting agencies accountable by terminating or fining those that fail to do their jobs.” This article touches on ED’s moves against ACICS and its overall push for accrediting agencies to “beef up their reviews of colleges and universities, just as lawmakers have called on the department to step up its review of accreditors.”

King: Appeal Would Be “Resolved Quickly.” The Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Stratford) “Morning Education” blog reported before Vadehra’s decision was announced that King “said Wednesday that if an appeal comes his way regarding the nation’s largest for-profit college accreditor, it would get ‘resolved quickly,’ suggesting the matter could get settled before President Obama leaves office.”

Higher Education

Rice’s Rebecca Richards-Kortum Named MacArthur Fellow.

In continuing coverage, the Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, McGuire) reports Rice University bioengineering professor Rebecca Richards-Kortum, an American Society of Engineering Education member, has been named a 2016 MacArthur Fellow. The honor is “a nod to the global work she’s done to deliver low-cost medical technology to Third World countries,” including technology “that assists babies who struggle to breathe and has significantly decreased mortality rates in countries using it.”

The NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) “Goats and Soda” blog reports Richards-Kortum “encourages students to come up with medical devices that will be valuable in the developing world.” She was recently informed that she “won a grant totaling $625,000,” even though “she hadn’t even been aware that she’d been nominated for the prestigious award.” The piece reports that Richards-Kortum “co-founded, with Maria Oden, a hands-on engineering training program at Rice University called Beyond Traditional Borders” which “challenges undergraduates to solve medical problems in the developing world.” PBS NewsHour Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) also mentions the award.

University Of Texas Partners With Census Bureau To Track Graduates’ Careers.

The Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Stratford) “Morning Education” blog reports that the University of Texas System will “soon be able to track where its graduates work, and how much they earn” through a partnership with the U.S. Census Bureau that will “give UT information from the bureau’s Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics program.” This pilot program “could signal that the Census Bureau is willing to use its data to help track college outcomes.” The article notes that a “growing number of advocates,” including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Gates Foundation “have called on the federal government to track students as they move through and beyond college.”

Proposed Bipartisan Senate Bill Seeks To Boost College Access, Graduation Rates.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Douglas-Gabriel) reports that Sens. Christopher A. Coons and Johnny Isakson have introduced legislation to address “concerns that the federal government, which pours about $180 billion a year into student loans, grants and tax benefits, is not doing enough to hold colleges accountable for providing access to qualified students and ensuring they graduate.”

Roll Call Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) reports that the senators developed the plan because many colleges have many different ways of defining success, leading “to a crisis where a record number of students never finish college and are left with an unmanageable level of debt that they cannot pay off.” Under the plan, “selective, wealthy colleges that do a poor job of recruiting and admitting low-income students would have four years to boost low-income student enrollment or be required to pay a fee to participate in any federal student assistance program. High-access, low-performing colleges would have the option to get up to $2 million a year for four years to improve student outcomes. But if they fail to improve, they’d be cut off.”

From ASEE
Liberal Arts and Engineering Education
The Teagle Foundation’s Liberal Arts and the Professions initiative embeds the liberal arts in undergraduate engineering education by forging curricular links between faculty in the disciplines and professional fields. The result is students more fully appreciate the social, cultural, and ethical dimensions of their work. To be considered for a grant, read the application guidelines and submit a 3-5 page concept paper to proposals@teagle.org. Contact Loni Bordoloi Pazich at bordoloi@teagle.org for more information.

Maker Summit
The ASU Citizen Science Maker Summit 2016  is a two-day event (Oct 27-28), hosted by Arizona State University in partnership with SciStarter, exploring the crossroads of citizen science and the Maker movement. Registration now open with discounts before Oct 1. Read ASEE’s Maker Report.

Profiles Survey Now Open
The annual Profiles of Engineering and Engineering Technology Schools survey is open. Make sure your institution is included in this important report.

Research and Development

Georgia Tech Systems Engineers Use Inspiration From Honeybees To Improve Internet Efficiency.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Rawlings) reports that research into how honeybee colonies interact “is helping make your work on the Internet quicker and more efficient.” The piece explains that a trio of Georgia Tech systems engineers in 1988 “were inspired by a National Public Radio feature on the foraging practices of honeybees.” The piece explains how the research was later used to attempt to “determine the most efficient way to allocate Web-hosting computer servers among various applications to meet the demands of ever-changing Internet traffic.”

UK Startup To Use Deep Learning Supercomputer For Alzheimer’s Drug Research.

Fierce Biotech Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Taylor) reports that UK startup BenevolentAI “has become the first European firm to install a purpose-built version of the DGX-1, an Nvidia supercomputer designed for deep learning.” The firm “will use the technology in its algorithm-driven drug discovery programs, the potential of which have reportedly netted the startup $100 million in funding and an Alzheimer’s pact worth up to $800 million.”

Yahoo! Finance Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Dormehl) reports that BenevolentAI Vice President of Engineering Derek Wise said, “We’re taking giant corpuses of data, hundreds of millions of documents and structured data sources, and using it to discover relationships between chemicals, diseases and information about the body. From that, we want to create a learning model that can help us predict more successful drugs – which work more effectively with fewer side effects – as well as [create] completely new, novel ideas for drugs that have never been attempted before.”

NASA STTR Program Selects R&D Proposals From 41 Firms.

SIGNAL Magazine Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Ackerman) reports that NASA’s Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program has chosen research and development proposals from 41 companies that aim to “enable future solar system missions,” and are also designed to benefit the US economy. Proposals cover areas that include “space weather prediction; gas-sensing technology for spacesuits; planetary compositional analysis and mapping; information systems for robotics; and advanced propulsion system ground test and launch.”

NASA Solicits Proposals For Research On Microbes Aboard ISS.

Popular Science Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Baggaley) reports that NASA has issued a solicitation for project proposals to investigate microbes from the bodies of astronauts who have returned from the International Space Station. According to NASA Space Biology Program Scientist David Tomko, the research will aim to investigate the evolution and adaptation of microbes aboard the ISS, in order to “better understand how to control the microbial environment in future human exploration spacecraft.”

Workforce

Cuts To North Dakota CTE Programs Spark Concerns About Future Oil Industry Workforce.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) reports on concerns in the energy sector about cuts to career and technical education programs in North Dakota. The piece explains that lower oil prices reduced revenue in the state, leading to K-12 cuts that have sparked worries “about a potential shortage of skilled workers when the oil industry ramps up.” North Dakota Association for Career and Technical Education Executive Director Rick Ross says “the state needs to continue to invest in career and technical education,” and that “the state still has 10,000 unfilled jobs and 70 percent of them require trade skills.”

Industry News

German Media Claims Audi Heavily Involved In VW Dieselgate.

Deutsche Welle (DEU) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) reports German media reports are indicating that Volkswagen’s luxury Audi subsidiary “was more deeply involved in the Dieselgate emissions-cheating scandal than was previously” discussed. Two German broadcasters reported that four Audi engine designers were suspended, allegedly because “they either developed illegal software for the three-liter TDI diesel engine or knew about it.” Reports claim investigators discovered “numerous documents they believe prove Ingolstadt, Germany-based Audi’s role in the fraud.” In a 2007 email, an Audi engineer wrote to executives about “strict exhaust emission limits in the US,” stating it wouldn’t be possible for Audi cars to comply with requirements “completely without cheating.” An Audi spokesman has not yet commented.

Engineering and Public Policy

Trump Vows To Deregulate US Energy Production.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Miller, Subscription Publication) reports that in remarks Thursday to a conference of gas industry executive, managers, and salespeople in Pittsburgh, Donald Trump promised to deregulate gas, oil, and coal production as part of his “America-first energy” plan. Trump said he would remove restrictions on the country’s “untapped energy—some $50 trillion dollars in shale energy, oil reserves and natural gas on federal lands, in addition to hundreds of years of coal energy reserves,” promising to end “all unnecessary regulations, and a temporary moratorium on new regulations not compelled by Congress or public safety.”

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Fontaine) reports that Trump promised to be “the energy industry’s ally as president,” claiming that “his energy plan would boost the gross domestic product by $100 billion, create 500,000 new jobs annually and generate trillions of dollars in new taxes over the next several decades.” However, the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Davenport, Subscription Publication) says Trump “promise[d] the impossible: a boom for both coal and gas,” adding that his “promises to those attending a corporate conference contained a fundamentally incompatible concept, as expanding the exploration of natural gas is the surest way to hurt coal production, and vice versa.”

FAA Advisory Group Adds Cybersecurity Language To Future Industry Standards.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Pasztor, Subscription Publication) reports an FAA technical advisory group, RTCA Inc., accepted language that will recommend cybersecurity protections in future industry standards. The Journal says the language does not mandate engineering requirements, but the move makes cybersecurity a high priority for the industry.

Native American Tribes Voice Dakota Access Pipeline Opposition To US Congress.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) reports Native American tribes “took their fight to Washington on Thursday” to stop the a $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline, as democrats “urged the federal government to scrap construction permits and reconsider the project.” Senior Democrat on the House Natural Resources Committee Representative Raul Grijalva, called on the US Army Corp of Engineers “to withdraw the existing permits for Dakota Access pipeline.” Several House Democrats organized a forum to “provide a platform for Native American tribes to voice their opposition to the pipeline and the government’s permitting process.” In another fight, aboriginal tribes from Canada and the northern US signed a treaty on Thursday to “scrap proposals to build more pipelines to carry crude from Alberta’s oil sands,” and the Standing Rock Sioux tribe is one of the treaty’s signatories.

Obama To Meet With Tribal Leaders Next Week. Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Volcovici) reports the leaders of hundreds of Native American tribes will meet with President Barack Obama at his eighth and final Tribal Nations Conference at the White House next week, while thousands of activists are encamped on the North Dakota prairie protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in the “largest Native American protest in decades.” The conference “offers the last chance for this administration to hear from tribal leaders about the shortcomings of the current consultation system.” Standing Rock Sioux spokesman said, “There’s an issue between what the Corps believes is consultation and what the tribe believes is consultation.” His Horse is Thunder said “tribe members voiced specific concerns with the government about the proximity of the pipeline to sacred burial sites, but these concerns were ignored.” But, US Army Corps of Engineers’ Amy Gaskill “said the tribe canceled several scheduled meetings,” and, “This was documented in a judge’s decision to reject the tribe’s request for an injunction.”

EPA Study Highlights Ways For Ports To Reduce Emissions.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Phillips, Subscription Publication) reports that according to new research published Thursday by the EPA, ports can reduce diesel-engine emissions by replacing old equipment and improving cargo-handling operations. In a statement Thursday, Christopher Grundler, director of the EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality, said researchers found proven ways to reduce pollution at ports, affecting 39 million Americans who live near port hubs.

SunCulture Solar Building “Smart” Panels With Integrate Batteries.

Fortune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) reports on a startup called SunCulture Solar, led by entrepreneur and inventor Christopher Estes, which has “redesigned the solar panel, integrating batteries into the panel itself, overlaying it with smart sensors and software and wirelessly linking it to a computing hub and cell phone app.” Estes has described his new solar panel as “the smartest on the planet,” and he hopes that rethinking the panel “will do for the solar industry what smart phones did for the computer industry.”

Xcel Announces Large Expansion Of Wind Power.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Hughlett) reports Xcel Energy announced yesterday that “it will increase its wind generation capacity in the Upper Midwest by 60 percent, enough electricity to power about 750,000 homes.” The company “plans to add eight to 10 wind farms that will serve Minnesota, the Dakotas, Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.” Combined “they will provide about 1,500 megawatts of power when the wind’s blowing” which is nearly “as much as the 1,600 megawatts of power produced by Xcel’s two Minnesota nuclear facilities.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

NYC Council Discuses Expanding CTE Programs, Tracking Progress.

Chalkbeat Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Veiga) reports New York City Council education committee members at a Wednesday hearing “consider[ed] a bill that would require the Department of Education to report each year on student demand for [career and technical education], how many CTE programs are offered, and graduation rates for students in CTE schools and programs.” The meeting comes after the city’s Department of Education announced $113 million in additional spending for CTE programs. Among the topics discussed were obstacles “such as teacher training, infrastructure needs and the state’s cumbersome approval process.”

Springfield, Ohio Hopes New STEM School Will Help Local Economy, Keep Graduates At Home.

A 2,121-word analysis on the NPR Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22) website discusses the new focus in Springfield, Ohio on STEM subjects, but questions whether the new emphasis with help in “to turn the tide” and stop young people from departing the city after graduation. With its the city seeing “its manufacturing base erode” and household incomes fall, “people with more resources moved away from downtown” and forced “a majestic hundred-year-old high school” to be shuttered. The city now hopes its new school, the Global Impact STEM Academy, the popularity of which is “drawing students from Springfield and surrounding communities,” “could create a higher-skilled workforce for local companies and it might attract new businesses.”

Michigan Positioned To Be National Leader In Training Of STEM Teachers.

In a Detroit News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/22, Hull) op-ed, Stephanie Hull of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, writes that “[e]ffective teachers can make even the schools with the fewest resources successful, putting their students well on the way to achieving their full potential.” While headlines suggest that few good people want to assume the challenge of teaching – especially math and science – in high-need schools, “this summer Michigan hosted an event that disproved some of those assumptions,” when science, technology, engineering, and math teachers from across the nation gathered in Detroit, whose selection as host city recognized Michigan’s work to improve STEM teacher preparation. With support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Hull’s foundation selected six Michigan universities to implement “rigorous, highly selective, clinically based programs” that “combined disciplinary content and pedagogical instruction.” Hull says “[i]t is only because of the commitment of states like Michigan that there is now a critical mass of educators experienced enough to mentor others.”

Thursday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

Elsevier to introduce new orthopaedic books at American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting 2016
STM publisher Elsevier has announced that it will introduce five hand surgery books and several other new leading orthopaedic texts, at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) Annual Meeting, September 29th through October 1st, 2016 in Austin, TX. Headlining Elsevier’s new book offerings is Green’s Operative Hand Surgery, 7th edition, considered the ‘gold standard’ text in hand, wrist and elbow surgery.
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Thomson Reuters reinvents keyword search technology, makes intellectual property searches more intuitive and comprehensive
The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters reinvented search technology for intellectual property (IP) researchers in its latest update to Thomson Innovation, the premiere IP research and analysis solution. Thomson Innovation brings together the world’s most comprehensive international patent coverage and the industry’s most powerful IP analysis tools, helping users make more accurate, informed decisions.
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SAGE Publishing and the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation launch new OA journal – OTO Open
Academic publisher SAGE Publishing has announced the launch of OTO Open, the official open access journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. OTO Open covers research on diseases and disorders affecting the ears, nose, throat, and related areas of the head and neck, and joins the Academy’s premier journal, Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.
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Two IOP Publishing journals to offer authors the choice of single or double-blind peer review from 2017
IOP Publishing has announced that two of its journals – Materials Research Express and Biomedical Physics & Engineering Express – will offer authors the choice of single or double-blind peer review from 2017. Under this new scheme authors will be able to choose whether to submit their paper to the conventional single-blind process or, if they prefer, to double-blind peer review.
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CHORUS announces pilot initiative to aid academic community effectively comply with the US Funder Public Access requirements
Non-profit organisation CHORUS has announced a pilot initiative to help the academic community effectively comply with the US Funder Public Access requirements. CHORUS signed a letter of agreement with the University of Florida (UF) and Scopus to explore how their services can be extended to institutions to monitor and increase the rate of compliance.
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Thieme partners with Publons to recognise reviewers
International medical and science publisher Thieme has announced a partnership with Publons to recognise the efforts of their reviewers. With two simple clicks, reviews for participating journals will be added to the respective Publons profile where one can showcase their reviewing expertise and influence.
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Pulsus Group acquires openaccessjournals.com
Medical Publisher Pulsus Group has announced the acquisition of Openaccessjournals.com with a view to enrich the current research in the field of Medicine. The move is seen as a crucial first step towards strengthening and integrating standard medical publications across the globe. Pulsus Group publishes a wide range of medical journals that focus on medical specialties like cardiology, Integrative Medicine, Surgery and Reproductive Medicine.
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Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

Search Alert: 79 new results
Your search alert called “UCD/UCDMC” has found 79 new results on Scopus. |  View all new results in Scopus
First 25 of 79 results
Document Author(s) Date Source Title
1 . How bacterial pathogens use type III and type IV secretion systems to facilitate their transmission Byndloss, M.X., Rivera-Chávez, F., Tsolis, R.M., Bäumler, A.J. 2017 Current Opinion in Microbiology ,
35 pp. 1 – 7 .
2 . A genome-wide association study meta-analysis of clinical fracture in 10,012 African American women Taylor, K.C., Evans, D.S., Edwards, D.R.V., Edwards, T.L., Sofer, T., Li, G., Liu, Y., Franceschini, N., Jackson, R.D., Giri, A., Donneyong, M., Psaty, B., Rotter, J.I., LaCroix, A.Z., Jordan, J.M., Robbins, J.A., Lewis, B., Stefanick, M.L., Liu, Y., Garcia, M., Harris, T., Cauley, J.A., North, K.E. 2016 Bone Reports ,
5 pp. 233 – 242 .
3 . Power imbalance induced BER performance loss under limited-feedback CoMP techniques Haile, B.B., Hämäläinen, J., Ding, Z. 2016 Eurasip Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking ,
2016 ( 1 ) , art. no. 212
4 . Bayes covariant multi-class classification Šuch, O., Barreda, S. 2016 Pattern Recognition Letters ,
84 pp. 99 – 106 .
5 . Physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to lung cancer incidence and mortality in older women: The Women’s Health Initiative Wang, A., Qin, F., Hedlin, H., Desai, M., Chlebowski, R., Gomez, S., Eaton, C.B., Johnson, K.C., Qi, L., Wactawski-Wende, J., Womack, C., Wakelee, H.A., Stefanick, M.L. 2016 International Journal of Cancer ,
139 ( 10 ) pp. 2178 – 2192 .
6 . A bias in the “mass-normalized” DTT response – An effect of non-linear concentration-response curves for copper and manganese Charrier, J.G., McFall, A.S., Vu, K.K.T., Baroi, J., Olea, C., Hasson, A., Anastasio, C. 2016 Atmospheric Environment ,
144 pp. 325 – 334 .
7 . Pavement systems reconstruction and resurfacing policies for minimization of life‐cycle costs under greenhouse gas emissions constraints Lee, J., Madanat, S., Reger, D. 2016 Transportation Research Part B: Methodological ,
93 pp. 618 – 630 .
8 . Different characteristics of high yield formation between inbred japonica super rice and inter-sub-specific hybrid super rice Wei, H., Zhang, H., Blumwald, E., Li, H., Cheng, J., Dai, Q., Huo, Z., Xu, K., Guo, B. 2016 Field Crops Research ,
198 pp. 179 – 187 .
9 . Sost, independent of the non-coding enhancer ECR5, is required for bone mechanoadaptation Robling, A.G., Kang, K.S., Bullock, W.A., Foster, W.H., Murugesh, D., Loots, G.G., Genetos, D.C. 2016 Bone ,
92 pp. 180 – 188 .
10 . Ex vivo culture of pre-placental tissues reveals that the allantois is required for maintained expression of Gcm1 and Tpbpα Hou, W., Sarikaya, D.P., Jerome-Majewska, L.A. 2016 Placenta ,
47 pp. 12 – 23 .
11 . Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) Motor Dysfunction Modeled in Mice Foote, M., Arque, G., Berman, R.F., Santos, M. 2016 Cerebellum ,
15 ( 5 ) pp. 611 – 622 .
12 . Explorations of Design Factors for Developments of Protective Gardening Gloves Koo, H.S., Teel, K.P., Han, S. 2016 Clothing and Textiles Research Journal,
34 ( 4 ) pp. 257 – 271 .
13 . Neutron reflectometry investigations of interfacial structures of Ti/TiN layers deposited by magnetron sputtering Watkins, E.B., Majewski, J., Baldwin, J.K., Chen, Y., Li, N., Hoagland, R.G., Yadav, S.K., Liu, X.-Y., Beyerlein, I.J., Mara, N.A. 2016 Thin Solid Films ,
616 pp. 399 – 407 .
14 . Improving Healthcare Systems to Reduce Healthcare Disparities in Viral Hepatitis Chak, E.W., Sarkar, S., Bowlus, C. 2016 Digestive Diseases and Sciences ,
61 ( 10 ) pp. 2776 – 2783 .
15 . Cerebellar Mild Iron Accumulation in a Subset of FMR1 Premutation Carriers with FXTAS Rogers, H., Ariza, J., Monterrubio, A., Hagerman, P., Martínez-Cerdeño, V. 2016 Cerebellum ,
15 ( 5 ) pp. 641 – 644 .
16 . Patterns of hypothalamic GnIH change over the reproductive period in starlings and rats Calisi, R.M., Geraghty, A.C., Avila, A., Kaufer, D., Bentley, G.E., Wingfield, J.C. 2016 General and Comparative Endocrinology ,
237 pp. 140 – 146 .
17 . Factors associated with abnormal pulmonary function test among subjects with normal chest radiography: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Chae, K.J., Kwon, K.-S., Jin, G.Y., Bang, H., Lee, J. 2016 Respirology ,
21 ( 7 ) pp. 1330 – 1332 .
18 . Origin matters REJMÁNEK, M., SIMBERLOFF, D. 2016 Environmental Conservation ,
pp. 1 – 3 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
19 . Effect of van der Waals interactions on the chemisorption and physisorption of phenol and phenoxy on metal surfaces Peköz, R., Donadio, D. 2016 Journal of Chemical Physics ,
145 ( 10 ) , art. no. 104701
20 . Activating NRF1-BRAF and ATG7-RAF1 fusions in anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma without BRAF p.V600E mutation Phillips, J.J., Gong, H., Chen, K., Joseph, N.M., van Ziffle, J., Jin, L.-W., Bastian, B.C., Bollen, A.W., Perry, A., Nicolaides, T., Solomon, D.A., Shieh, J.T. 2016 Acta Neuropathologica ,
pp. 1 – 4 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
21 . The Neotropical cuckoo wasp genus Ipsiura Linsenmaier, 1959 (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae): Revision of the species occurring in Brazil Lucena, D.A.A., Kimsey, L.S., Almeida, E.A.B. 2016 Zootaxa ,
4165 ( 1 ) pp. 1 – 71 .
22 . Changes in the Transnational Family Structures of Mexican Farm Workers in the Era of Border Militarization Hamilton, E.R., Hale, J.M. 2016 Demography ,
pp. 1 – 23 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
23 . What clinical characteristics and radiographic one parameters are associated with patellofemoral instability after kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty? Nedopil, A.J., Howell, S.M., Hull, M.L. 2016 International Orthopaedics ,
pp. 1 – 9 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
24 . Quantification of Leaf Water Potential, Stomatal Conductance and Photosynthetically Active Radiation in Rainfed Hazelnut Özmen, S. 2016 Erwerbs-Obstbau ,
pp. 1 – 8 .
Articles not published yet, but available online Article in Press
25 . 750 GeV diphoton resonance in a vector-like extension of Hill model at a 100 TeV hadron collider Liu, N., Wang, W., Zhang, M., Zheng, R. 2016 International Journal of Modern Physics A ,
31 ( 25 ) , art. no. 1650145
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Latest Publications: UC Davis/UC Davis Medical Center

ASEE First Bell – Breaking news in the engineering and technology field

Leading the News

Academics, Museum Officials Sign Open Letter Protesting Dakota Access Pipeline.

The New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Ryzik, Subscription Publication) reports more than a thousand archaeologists, anthropologists, curators, museum officials, and academics have signed an appeal to President Obama, the Justice Department, the Department of the Interior, and the Army Corps of Engineers asking for further study of land involved in the Dakota Access pipeline project, around the Missouri River near the border between North and South Dakota. The open letter released Wednesday says, “We join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in denouncing the recent destruction of ancient burial sites, places of prayer and other significant cultural artifacts sacred to the Lakota and Dakota people” as a result of the pipeline construction. The Dakota Access pipeline also has drawn scrutiny from the Society for American Archaeology and other professional organizations.

Meanwhile, Greenwire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Northey, Subscription Publication) reports that “an oil executive blasted the Obama administration” at the Shale Insight conference on Wednesday “for intervening in the $3.7 billion Dakota Access pipeline and faulted federal regulators for making ‘common cause’ with environmentalists intent on villainizing the oil and gas industry.” Marathon Petroleum Corp. Chairman, President and CEO Gary Heminger told attendees, “Some activists are trying to portray fossil fuels and the companies that produce, transport and sell them as villains. In some cases, regulatory agencies and elected officials are making common cause with activists, shaping our energy and environmental policy.”

Additional coverage of the controversy was provided by The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Stevens), the Billings (MT) Gazette Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21), andCounterCurrents (IND) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21).

Higher Education

Accreditors To Ramp Up Scrutiny Of Colleges With Low Graduation Rates.

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Belkin, Subscription Publication) reports the Council of Regional Accrediting Commissions, which is the umbrella organization over seven regional accreditors supervising nearly 3,000 schools, has announced that it will be increasing its scrutiny of any college under its supervision which has a four-year graduation rate under 25%. The Journal paints the move as a response to rising criticism that accrediting agencies give poor-quality colleges access to Federal student aid.

The Hechinger Report Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports that accreditors are facing pressure over “the rising number of students who have dropped out of college saddled with debt,” and are therefore “promising to crack down by taking a closer look at graduation rates, loan repayment rates and default rates.” The piece reports the council “announced Wednesday that it would ‘pay special attention’ to four-year institutions with graduation rates below 25 percent.” The Hechinger Report adds that the council said it will scrutinize more than just graduation rates, “since the number of students and the transfer rates often affect a college’s numbers.”

Inside Higher Ed Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports the council says it will call on colleges with low on-time graduation rates “to account for how they are working to improve those numbers.”

The Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) “Morning Education” blog also covers this story, noting that the announcement “comes after the Obama administration last year sought to publicly prod accreditors to focus more on student outcomes by publishing data about how students fare at the schools they approve.” The piece notes that former Education Secretary Arne Duncan had “criticized accreditors as the ‘watchdogs that don’t bite,’ and proposed ending a federal ban on the Education Department setting specific standards for how accreditors judge colleges on metrics like graduation rates.” The Chronicle of Higher Education Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) also covers this story.

Southeast Missouri State University Students, Faculty Attend Oklahoma Supercomputing Symposium.

Southeast Missouri State University Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports, “Seven Southeast Missouri State University students and three faculty members from the College of Science, Technology and Agriculture advanced their supercomputing knowledge” at the Oklahoma Supercomputing Symposium 2016 at the University of Oklahoma earlier this week. Participants “attended a reception and poster session and participated in a supercomputing tour on Sept. 20. Posters covered advanced computing research projects and technical innovations from vendors and attending universities.”

Data Show Wide Range Of Gender Equity In Engineering Degrees At Top Schools.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Anderson) reports that while on average, women earn around 20% of all engineering degrees nationwide, “reflecting generations of male dominance in the field.” Nevertheless, women “earned a majority of bachelor’s degrees in engineering in 2015 at two private schools with sizable programs,” the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering and MIT. At several other top programs, that figure was in the 40 percent range. The article touches on the impact of the #LookLikeAnEngineer movement, and explores gender diversity efforts at engineering programs at major schools.

MIT And Other Schools Offering Free On-Line Graduate Courses.

Bloomberg News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Coy) reports that “the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 13 other schools said they would offer online graduate-level courses for free, open to all.” The program, referred to as “MicroMasters,” teaches “about a quarter of the material in a typical master’s degree program and involves subjects in critically short supply in the workplace. The certificates are likely to carry weight with employers because of the quality of the universities standing behind them.” Upon program complete, students can pay $1,000 for a certificate or apply to the full degree program.

Study Highlights Factors Leading To College Failure For Well-Performing High School Students.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Guo) reports that according to a study from the University of Toronto, students need more than intelligence to succeed in college. Several factors, including personality, grit, perseverance, conscientiousness, culture, and socioeconomic status have an impact on student performance as they transition into the college environment.

From ASEE
Liberal Arts and Engineering Education
The Teagle Foundation’s Liberal Arts and the Professions initiative embeds the liberal arts in undergraduate engineering education by forging curricular links between faculty in the disciplines and professional fields. The result is students more fully appreciate the social, cultural, and ethical dimensions of their work. To be considered for a grant, read the application guidelines and submit a 3-5 page concept paper to proposals@teagle.org. Contact Loni Bordoloi Pazich at bordoloi@teagle.org for more information.

Maker Summit
The ASU Citizen Science Maker Summit 2016  is a two-day event (Oct 27-28), hosted by Arizona State University in partnership with SciStarter, exploring the crossroads of citizen science and the Maker movement. Registration now open with discounts before Oct 1.

Profiles Survey Now Open
The annual Profiles of Engineering and Engineering Technology Schools survey is open. Make sure your institution is included in this important report.

Research and Development

Scientists Successfully Pair Magnetic And Electric Materials.

Phys (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Yang) reports, “Scientists have successfully paired ferroelectric and ferrimagnetic materials so that their alignment can be controlled with a small electric field at near room temperatures, an achievement that could open doors to ultra low-power microprocessors, storage devices and next-generation electronics.” Research co-led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Cornell University will be published today in Nature.

Global Developments

Security Engineer Discovers North Korea Has Just 28 Websites.

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Taylor) reports North Korea accidentally revealed that it has only 28 websites. The Post says the “unusual” reveal showed that only 28 websites use North Korea’s website country code domain name “.kp.” The Post contrasts this with the Germany’s “more than 16 million addresses” using the “.de” domain name. Security engineer Matt Bryant discovered the websites when he “noticed that North Korea’s system administrators had made a mistake that allowed outside users to query websites that used the “.kp” name.” The Washington Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Sands) reports similarly.

Industry News

Privacy Concerns Raised Over Google’s New Messaging App Allo.

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Baig) reports some individuals are raising privacy concerns over Google’s new messaging app Allo because the default setting stores chat logs “on Google’s servers until you actively decide to delete them.” Google’s reasoning for saving the data is because the new app is “built around machine learning and artificial intelligence.” Allo will review the saved data and try to anticipate what your next message response will be. President of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and Georgetown law professor Marc Rotenberg tells USA today that law enforcement will love Allo because they could theoretically subpoena Google to obtain conversation content from the app.

The Washington (DC) Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Peterson) reports that content is “not automatically protected by that extra secure form of encryption, which allows only those who send and receive messages to unlock them” but that users can choose an “incognito” setting for encryption. It will be the first of Google’s products that feature an encryption option in the base code. The Hill Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Uchill) reports that Google’s decision to still store the data “angered privacy advocates.” They prefer the incognito mode be the default setting. BBC News (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Kelion) reports that Big Brother Watch research director Daniel Nesbitt said that “it’s important that citizens are given enough information about what will happen to their data for them make an informed choice about whether or not they want to use this service.”

Additional coverage is available from NBC News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21), The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21), CNET News Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21), and the Independent (UK) Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Griffin).

Tesla Updates Software To Enhance Radar, Patches Security Gap.

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports that beginning Wednesday night, an over-the-air software update will enhance the radar and other features of Tesla automobiles, making the Model S sedan and Model X SUV more reliant on radar than cameras when operating in the semi-autonomous Autopilot mode. CEO Elon Musk said the change should help avoid crashes like the one which killed a Florida Tesla driver in May. Musk said the update will also add a maximum temperature control system to help keep kids and pets safe if left in the car. The Verge Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) notes that Musk first announced the new Autopilot 8.0 software on August 31, but its release was postponed due to the September 1 explosion of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. A hardware update is also reportedly in the pipeline, and it is expected to add more cameras and radar sensors to its vehicles.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Mitchell) reports that Tesla, separately from the Autopilot software update, quickly patched a security hole exposed by a Chinese security research team which hacked into a Tesla Model S. From 12 miles away, the hackers seized control of the car’s brakes, turned on its windshield wipers, retracted the side mirror, and opened the trunk – all while the car was in motion. According to Tesla, “[t]he issue demonstrated is only triggered when the Web browser is used, and also required the car to be physically near to and connected to a malicious wifi hotspot. Our realistic estimate is that the risk to our customers was very low.” Because additional hacking is inevitable as more cars connect to the Internet, cybersecurity was among the issues addressed in voluntary guidelines released Tuesday by the Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Engineering and Public Policy

Ackerman: Nation’s Satellite Capability Must Be Supported, Strengthened.

In a Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/20, Ackerman) op-ed, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Steve Ackerman calls for support for the nation’s weather satellite capability, and specifically for bills in the Senate and the House, that aim to fortify NOAA’s satellite portfolio and prioritize weather research. The Senate bill “NOAA Satellite Management and Design” is sponsored by Sen. John Thune (R-SD), while its House counterpart is sponsored by Reps. Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR), Jim Bridenstine (R-OK), and Frank D. Lucas (R-OK). Ackerman says that for improved weather prediction, “One of the most important tools is a growing fleet of spacecraft dedicated to the task of watching and reporting on our skies. Support provided by the weather-focused bills currently in the Congress is a critical first step to making this happen.”

Report: Television Makers Exploiting Loopholes In DOE Tests.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Marshall, Subscription Publication) reports that flaws in DOE test procedures are being “exploited by television manufacturers and threaten to worsen carbon emissions and consumer costs dramatically, the Natural Resources Defense Council said in a report.” The NRDC and Ecos Research found loopholes in DOE’s procedures for TVs that allow companies to produce televisions that may use twice as much power as advertised. “Test conditions have allowed some companies to install a motion-detection dimming feature that powers down the screen’s backlight during the test to achieve large energy savings, but not when in normal use.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports that televisions made by Samsung, LG Electronics and Vizio saddle households with an extra $120 million in electricity bills each year and generate tons of additional pollution. Though not illegal, the behavior “smacks of bad faith,” NRDC senior scientist Noah Horowitz said.

Connecticut Wants EPA To Act On Polluting Pennsylvania Plant.

The “Morning Energy” blog of Politico Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reported Connecticut’s congressional delegation wants the Environmental Protection Agency “to do something about smog-forming pollution coming from a Pennsylvania coal-fired power plant that floats downwind and hurts air quality in the Nutmeg State.” In a letter yesterday to the EPA, “the lawmakers urge the agency to take a close look at the June petition from Connecticut regulators asking EPA to force more pollution controls on the Brunner Island coal plant in Pennsylvania’s York County.”

Clean Power Plan Hearing Expected To Draw Big Crowd.

E&E Publishing Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, Subscription Publication) reports that “professional line-standers will stake out positions long before sunrise Tuesday” outside the DC Circuit Court where judges could decide the fate of the Clean Power Plan. The court’s chief deputy clerk, Marilyn Sargent, estimates that about 400 seats will be made available in the courtroom and in two overflow rooms, and that for high-profile cases, people sometimes show up 24 hours early.

Automakers Raise Concerns Over Fuel Efficiency Rule.

Reuters Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports on testimony submitted to the House Energy and Commerce Committee by Mitch Bainwol, head of the industry trade group Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers saying that the issue is not whether vehicle fuel economy will improve, but rather how, by when, “and at what cost to consumers, industry and the economy as a whole.” Obama Administration officials countered that the policy is working. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration general counsel Paul Hemmersbaugh and Environmental Protection Agency official Janet McCabe “both said that fuel saving technologies are entering the market faster than expected.”

Elementary/Secondary Education

Boeing Gives $6 Million To Promote Tech Worker Training.

The Seattle Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports Boeing is distributing $6 million in grant money to a “wide-ranging group of nonprofits and education institutions” in Washington state “in an effort to boost tech training and skills.” The firm “is aiming to reach a diverse group of high school and college students, many of whom historically haven’t pursued STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.” Boeing CEO Ray Conner said Wednesday “the company wants to provide opportunities for tech jobs to a generation that’s growing more racially and ethnically diverse.”

The AP Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21) reports Boeing said “the grants are geared toward programs that enhance science, technology, engineering and math, workforce training, and educational and career opportunities for students.” The firm said $1 million of the funding is earmarked “to further support students seeking a STEM education and enhanced learning opportunities at local universities.”

Also in the News

Rice Engineer Named MacArthur Fellow.

The Houston Chronicle Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/21, McGuire) profiles Rebecca Richards-Kortum, a Rice University bioengineering professor who was named a 2016 MacArthur Fellow. Richards-Kortum says the $625,000 grant is “a nod to the global work she’s done to deliver low-cost medical technology to Third World countries,” including “a piece of machinery she helped develop that assists babies who struggle to breathe and has significantly decreased mortality rates in countries using it.”

Wednesday’s Lead Stories

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Scope – Knowledgespeak: STM Industry Daily News Alert

New ‘results free’ peer-review process to be piloted for academic publishing
The open access journal, BMC Psychology, has announced it will launch the first ever randomised controlled trial to find out if a ‘results free’ peer-review process can help reduce publication bias. The trial will start with an initial pilot phase where the first 10 authors to opt in will go through the ‘results free’ process to show that the procedure is feasible and efficient. Following the pilot, a randomised controlled trial will start where authors who opt in are randomly assigned to the ‘results free’ or normal peer-review process.
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Over 750 publisher journals to integrate with Publons
Publisher John Wiley & Sons has announced that a further 750 journals will be integrated with Publons, the world’s leading peer review recognition platform. The partnership is an expansion of a 6-month pilot program that Wiley and Publons ran in 2015. The partnership allows those who peer review for any of Wiley’s participating journals to effortlessly track and verify every review.
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EBSCO offers five scholarships to attend 2017 ALA Midwinter Meeting
The American Library Association (ALA) and EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) are partnering to offer five scholarships for librarians to attend the 2017 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Atlanta. The scholarship allows more librarians to take advantage of the opportunities for continuing education, meetings and interactions with colleagues at the meeting, which will take place from January 20 – 24, 2017.
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ProQuest partners with Oxford University Press to make thousands of ebooks available on the UPSO platform via the OASIS system
ProQuest is teaming with academic publisher Oxford University Press to make thousands of ebooks available on University Press Scholarship Online platform (UPSO) via the OASIS® system. A groundbreaking online library, UPSO grants access to more than 20,000 monographs in subjects covering almost every area of academia.
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De Gruyter Mouton and American Psychological Association announce publishing partnership
De Gruyter Mouton and the American Psychological Association have started a unique publishing partnership which embraces the best contemporary research on topics where psychology and language intersect. The publishing partnership finds its first culmination in the launch of the joint book series Language and the Human Lifespan, which features four volumes in 2016.
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Scientific American launches For Science, a freely accessible online version of Scientific American for the Arabic-speaking world
Scientific American, the oldest continuously published magazine in the US, has announced the launch of For Science (Lel Elm), a new freely accessible online version of Scientific American for the Arabic-speaking world, featuring the latest science news and features of both global and regional significance. The site will provide authoritative insights into and news of the latest developments from the worlds of science, technology and biomedicine, as well as disseminating the voices of the most influential thinkers from the region.
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CERN in deal with leading scientific publishers and learned societies to extend SCOAP3 initiative for three more years
CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, and the ‘host organisation’ of SCOAP3 has announced that it has signed contracts with 10 leading scientific publishers and learned societies to extend this Open Access initiative for three more years. This was the last step for this unique global Open Access partnership to continue supporting authors worldwide through at least December 2019.
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